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Fin Final Citywide Proposed Budget for Fiscal Year 2020-2021 and Legal Spending Limit____________________________________________________________________________________ FOR CITY CLERK ONLY Council Meeting: June 15, 2020 Disposition: Resolutions 14830 x 14831 Agenda Item No: 5.b Meeting Date: June 15, 2020 SAN RAFAEL CITY COUNCIL AGENDA REPORT Department: Finance Prepared by: Nadine Atieh Hade, Finance Director Bill Guerin, Director of Public Works Shibani Nag, Director of Human Resources City Manager Approval: ___________ TOPIC: FINAL CITYWIDE PROPOSED BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2020-2021 AND LEGAL SPENDING LIMIT SUBJECT: 1. RESOLUTION APPROVING THE CITYWIDE BUDGET AND CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 2020-2021 AND PROVIDING FOR THE APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURE OF ALL SUMS SET FORTH IN THE BUDGET IN THE AMOUNT OF $127,943,913; 2.RESOLUTION APPROVING FISCAL YEAR 2020-2021 GANN APPROPRIATIONS LIMIT AT $143,208,909 RECOMMENDATION: 1. Adopt a resolution approving the FY 2020-21 operating budget and Three-Year Capital Improvement Program. 2.Adopt a resolution approving the FY 2020-21 Gann Appropriations limit. S UMMARY : This report presents the final proposed citywide budget for Fiscal Year (FY) 2020-21, beginning July 1, 2020 and ending June 30, 2021. This item is the culmination of a process that included a public discussion of the assumptions underlying the operating budget at the City Council Finance Subcommittee meeting on May 12, 2020, and the City’s COVID-19 Economic Recovery Plan (CERP) which was presented to the City Council on May 18, 2020. In addition, the preliminary Capital Improvement Program was presented to the City Council Finance Subcommittee on April 14, 2020, and subsequently to the City Council on May 18, 2020 for feedback and discussion. The final draft budget and proposed staffing changes were presented and discussed at the City Council Finance Committee meeting of June 9, 2020. SAN RAFAEL CITY COUNCIL AGENDA REPORT / Page: 2 For the FY 2020-21 budget, ongoing General Fund operational expenditures are supported by current period revenues and use of emergency reserves, and the spending plans of all other funds are supported by projected revenues and accumulated resources in their respective funds. Proposed appropriations citywide total $127,943,913 and are within the legal spending limit. This budget is different than others we have presented over the past several years as the financial impacts of COVID-19 are substantial and have created a significant budget deficit for FY 2019-20, 2020- 21 and are expected to have a longer lasting impact. As a result of the massive revenue losses which have been occurring since the pandemic and are projected to continue, the FY 2020-21 budget represents a reduction in every department’s funding. Reductions City-wide amount to approximately $6.7 million. BACKGROUND: This report will focus on the following: 1. Brief status of Fiscal Year 2019-20 budget performance 2. COVID-19 Economic Recovery Plan 3. Proposed operating and capital budget presented for all City funds for Fiscal Year 2020-21 4. Fiscal Year 2020-21 Appropriations Limit BUDGET ACTION The purpose of this report is to provide the City Council and community with the final proposed citywide budget for FY 2020-21 which has been prepared for adoption based on the direction provided at earlier public meetings. The budget is both a spending plan for the City’s available financial resources and the legal authority for City departments to spend these resources for public purposes. Through these resources, services are provided to meet the needs of the community. The City Council and City staff respond to the community’s needs in part through the budget, which is intended to balance not only revenues and costs, but also community priorities. Consistent with the direction provided by the City Council in May 2014, the additional one-quarter percent sales tax revenues provided by Measure E, effective April 1, 2014 through March 31, 2034, are dedicated to funding major construction and improvements to public safety facilities (also referred to as the San Rafael Essential Facilities project). “GANN” APPROPRIATIONS LIMIT Article XIIIB of the California Constitution (enacted with the passage of Proposition 4 in 1979 – the Gann initiative – with modifications under Proposition 111 passed in June 1990, and implemented by California Government Code sections 7900, and following) provides the basis for the Gann appropriation limitation. The City’s appropriation growth rate is limited to changes in population and either the change in California per capita income or the change in the local assessment roll due to new, non-residential construction. SAN RAFAEL CITY COUNCIL AGENDA REPORT / Page: 3 ANALYSIS: UPDATE ON CURRENT BUDGET/FISCAL YEAR 2019-2020 General Fund Revenues: The original FY 2019-20 budget, adopted on July 15, 2019, projected $80,282,912 in revenues and in the Mid-year budget review (updated budget) presented on February 3, 2020, revenues were increased by $200,000 for a projected balance of $80,482,912 based on the one-time unexpected overperformance of sales tax. Current Revenues are projected to be $75,401,133, which is $5,081,780, or 6.3% below the updated budget, based on activity through March which is the most up to date information available from the State. This reduction is a result of the COVID-19 pandemic and resulting economic shutdown which significantly reduced local economic activity and corresponding tax and fee revenue to the City. Most notably, sales and use taxes are projected to be approximately $3.7 million less than the updated FY 2019- 20 budget and Transit Occupancy tax about $800 thousand less than the updated FY 2019-20 budget. Expenditures: General Fund expenditures have also been significantly reduced based on strategic measures taken by the City immediately following the COVID-19 public health crisis; expenditures are currently projected to total $76,510,689 on June 30, 2020. This is a $2.8 million decrease from the updated budget total of $79,311,813 and results mostly from salary, benefit, and retirement contributions savings. These savings were achieved due to the following: • Freezing all vacant positions, • A one-time reduction in overtime expenses due to the COVID-19 pandemic because public safety employees have not been taking vacation time and therefore no one has to fill in their shift on overtime, and • Several employees either resigned or retired towards the end of Fiscal Year 2019 and during Fiscal Year 2020 whose positions were filled with PEPRA employees, which substantially decreases the employer’s pension contribution expense. After accounting for additional transfers to the Recreation fund as mentioned below and the budget deficit which was anticipated before COVID-19, the General Fund is in a projected deficit position of $2.85 million for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2020. This loss will be absorbed by available one-time funds from the prior year in addition to the cost saving measures noted above. Unfortunately, this is insufficient to balance the budget, so staff regrettably recommends the use of emergency reserves. General fund 6/30/2020 Projected net losses as of June 30, 2020 $ 2,854,029 Use of One-time funds available from prior years (2,132,487) Use of emergency reserve funds (721,542) Adjusted losses as of June 30, 2020 $ - The use of $721,542 from the City’s emergency reserve fund reduces the reserve percentage to 9% of originally budgeted expenditures. The General Fund Reserve Policy adopted on November 3, 2014 asks for the reserve to be at a ten percent minimum. Other Funds The impacts of COVID-19 have caused a revenue strain on several of the City’s other funds such as the General Plan Special Revenue Fund, the Gas Tax Fund, Child Care, and Recreation. At this point, most SAN RAFAEL CITY COUNCIL AGENDA REPORT / Page: 4 funds continue to be self-sufficient by using available fund balance and/or putting a stop on non-essential projects. However, due to starting the year with no available fund balance and with having to refund fees for cancelled recreation programs while still utilizing staff for other operations such as disaster service workers, the Recreation fund will need an additional transfer of approximately $300,000 from the General Fund. The Recreation fund receives annual contribution of approximately $2 million each year dependent on operations. The evaluation of other funds will continue with the year-end close. Any required adjustments will be presented to the City Council as part of the year-end update which staff will present to the City Council in September. COVID-19 Economic Recovery Plan When the City Council reviewed the mid-year report for FY 2019-20 on February 3, 2020, nothing indicated it would be an exceptional year and require a departure from the usual process. However, since then, the world has been faced with a public health crisis brought on by COVID-19 that led to a shelter- in-place order, which in turn shut down most economic activity world-wide. On March 17, 2020, the City Council ratified the proclamation of a local state of emergency signed by the City Manager on March 10, 2020. The City’s COVID-19 website can be found here. On May 4, 2020, staff brought forward a report discussing the severe financial burdens this pandemic has created for the City, the lost revenues, recommended actions to reduce expenses and increase revenues. On May 18, 2020, after a collaborative process that included all City departments, a COVID-19 Economic Recovery Plan (CERP) was presented to the City Council for consideration, feedback and acceptance of the informational report. The purpose of the CERP is to communicate how the City plans to economically recover from this public health and subsequent financial crisis. In a typical year, staff would present the City’s Goals and Objectives for the next fiscal year along with the proposed fiscal year budget. However, the CERP is currently serving as our goals and objectives, which gives staff time to continue assessing the impact of COVID-19 on the City’s revenues. This additional time will allow staff to evaluate the further expense reductions necessary, which informs if additional reductions in services and/or staff are needed to maintain a balanced budget. Staff will have the opportunity to work with the City Council and our community as these goals are developed and consider such dynamic needs such as racial justice goals, pandemic and economic recovery goals, and more. PROPOSED FISCAL YEAR 2020-21 CITYWIDE BUDGET HIGHLIGHTS  Citywide Budget: The total proposed FY2020-21 expenditure budget for the City is $147,750,690 (Exhibit I to the Budget Resolution). This sum reflects all funds and operations for the City, including active capital projects. The Capital Improvement Program has planned expenditures of $23 million for the year of which staff reports will be submitted for major projects. Appropriations are supported by FY2020-21 revenue and other sources projected at $130,036,310 as well as by fund balances retained from previous periods for capital projects.  General Fund Budget: The proposed General Fund expenditure budget comprises $81,581,228 for operations which includes reductions of approximately $6.7 million are supported by revenues, transfers in, and reserves, projected at $79,398,300, resulting in a deficit before allocations of SAN RAFAEL CITY COUNCIL AGENDA REPORT / Page: 5 $2,182,928. The deficit is planned to be absorbed by an additional allocation from the emergency reserve of $2,182,928, as we recover from the COVID-19 pandemic and resulting economic shut- down. (Exhibit II to the Budget Resolution).  State Budget Impacts: On May 14, 2020, Governor Gavin Newsom signed the May revision to the FY 2020-21 state budget, which totals approximately $203 billion in spending. The May revision saw nearly $20 billion pared down from the January proposal in light of the COVID-19 pandemic. City staff will look for any opportunities to pursue additional assistance and available funding. o Housing: The May Revision proposes to expend $331 for housing counseling and mortgage assistance and renter legal aid and maintains the $500 million in low-income housing state tax credits from the Governor’s previous budget in January. Significant reversions of funding include $250 million in mixed-income development funds, $200 million in infill infrastructure grant funds, and $115 in other housing program funds. o Homelessness: The May Revision proposes $750 million in federal funding to purchase hotels and motels secured through Project Room Key, to be owned and operated by local governments or non-profits providers. o Transportation: Although fuel tax revenues used to fund transportation project are expected to decline by $1.8 billion over the next five years, the May Revision maintains planning and engineering staffing levels continue work on previously programmed projects and support preparedness for stimulus funding. o Emergency Preparedness and Response: The budget includes $127 million to enhance the state’s capacity to respond to natural disasters, including wildfires. Of this total $38.2 million is proposed for the California Disaster Assistance Act to be used to repair, restore, or replace public real property damaged or destroyed by a disaster. The California Public Utilities Commission is set to receive $30 million in an effort to combat risk of utility-caused wildfires. o Environmental Quality: The Revision includes a cut to the climate catalyst fund, a four- year $1 billion revolving loan program proposed in the January budget intended to seed recycling, low-carbon transportation and climate-smart agriculture products. The revision also eliminates the proposal of a Climate Resilience Bond that was previously included as part of the January budget. The bond was meant to support investments over the next five years to reduce specific climate risks across California through long-term investment in natural and built infrastructure. Funding for the Natural Resources Agency and the Environmental Protection Agency was largely preserved. The $965 million Cap and Trade expenditure plan was also preserved, however, given the uncertainty surrounding proceeds generated at auction due to the significant decrease in emissions, a pay-as-you- go mechanism was established. o Community Services: As may be expected, Community Services was the recipient of numerous cuts or eliminations in the revised budget. The Department of Parks and Recreation is facing $30 million in budget cuts in fiscal 2021-22 and after. o Public Safety: To meet the immediate needs of local law enforcement training the May Revision proposes to use $10 million to create a distance learning grant program, increase the functionality of the Police Officer Standards and Training Learning Portal, and upgrade previously produced and developed distance learning courses. o COVID-19: $450 million in CARES act funding is proposed to be allocated to cities to be used toward homelessness, public health, public safety, and other services to address the COVID-19 pandemic. The State Senate and Assembly continue to release budget proposal details to increase this amount. At this time, The City of San Rafael could receive up to $600,000 of funding for qualified expenses. The State has allocated the funds that SAN RAFAEL CITY COUNCIL AGENDA REPORT / Page: 6 cities are eligible for to counties, therefore the County of Marin will evaluate the City’s reimbursement request and determine how much funding the City receives. General Fund The City’s General Fund accounts for most of the major services to residents and businesses (such as police, fire suppression and prevention, planning, building, library, parks, streets, engineering, traffic enforcement and management, and cultural programs). The General Fund operating-related appropriations for FY 2020-21 total approximately $81.6 million. These appropriations comprise $79.6 million of operating expenditures and $2 million of transfers to Community Services in support of the Recreation Fund. The appropriations are supported by $75.5 million in projected revenues and $3.9 million of transfers from other funds. The transfers include $1.1 million from the 2018 Lease Revenue Bond proceeds that will be used to pay interest on the Bonds from the General Fund; $1.6 million reimbursement from Gas Tax for support of street maintenance salaries; $0.7 million from the Employee Retirement internal service fund for debt service on the outstanding pension obligation bonds; and $0.5 million from the Parking Services Enterprise Fund for administrative support. The following table (Figure 1) summarizes the detailed information provided in Exhibit II of the Resolution (Attachment 2) and presents the proposed FY 2020-21 budget with a comparison to the approved FY 2019-20 budget. Revenues available for operations are projected to be $5 million, or 6.2% lower than those of the FY 2019-20 year. Most notably, property tax revenues increased by over 4%, or $861,000 while sales and use tax, hit the hardest by the COVID-19 pandemic, decreased by over 15% or $5.2 million dollars. Expenditures are projected to decrease by a net $1.8 million, or 2.4% over those of the FY 2019-20 approved budget. City-wide, departments actively worked to reduce expenses for the FY 2020-21 budget, while creatively working towards redesigning services to be able to deliver them more efficiently. Decreases to the FY 2020-21 expense budget include approximately $700,000 in furloughs, $1.4 million in frozen positions, $586,000 due to the Voluntary Retirement Separation Program, and other reductions and transfers in of approximately $4 million. As part of the reductions of $4 million, $1.2 million was transferred in to the General Fund from the Gas Tax Fund to support salaries of those employees performing street and road maintenance and repairs. This shows up as a resource which offsets the salary expense so the reduction in the expenditure line is not visible, thus only showing a change from previous year of $1.8 million but represents a change of $3 million. Additionally, the gross reductions of approximately $5.4 million were offset by expense increases such as agreed to salary increases for certain bargaining units that extended their contract prior to the COVID-19 events, an increase in the pension expense based on MCERA’s updated contribution rates, one-time project costs of offset by grant revenues for Community Development, cost of living increases for non-personnel expenditures and other operating expenses as part of doing business. Not only did the City have to balance the budget by using emergency reserve funds of $2.2 million, but there are several City goals that remain unfunded. Most notably, building maintenance of city-owned property, below ground infrastructure, general unfunded liability for pension and health, and new initiatives. SAN RAFAEL CITY COUNCIL AGENDA REPORT / Page: 7 Figure 1 General Fund Approved FY 2019-20 Proposed FY 2020-21 $ change from previous year % change from previous year Revenues $ 80,482,912 $ 75,483,680 $ (4,999,232) -6.2% Transfers in 4,701,350 3,914,620 Total Resources $ 85,184,262 $ 79,398,300 $ (5,785,962) -6.8% Expenditures $ 76,357,589 $ 74,557,667 $ (1,799,922) -2.4% Debt Service 2,954,224 5,023,561 $ 2,069,337 70.0% Transfers out – operating 2,059,439 2,000,000 Total Operating Uses $ 81,371,252 $ 81,581,228 $ 209,976 0.3% Capital Transfers (Measure E for Essential Public Facilities) $ 4,077,000 $ - Net Loss before Allocations $ (263,990) $ (2,182,928) Use of one-time funds 263,990 - Net Loss After Use of One- Time Funds $ - $ (2,182,928) Use of emergency reserve funds - 2,182,928 Net Loss After Use of Emergency Reserve $ - $ - Revenue Trends and Assumptions: Sales and Transaction & Use Tax: In March, staff began analyzing the City’s financial situation based on the Shelter-in-Place Order. The swift reaction by consumers and businesses to the COVID-19 public health crisis has caused a massive decrease in spending of goods and services. Staff has been working with our financial consultant (HDL) to better understand what to expect for sales and use tax revenue losses and assumptions on when we can expect to see these revenues return to normal. HDL has advised the City that both sales and Measure E tax projections will experience a recessionary impact from the Coronavirus pandemic. HDL’s Consensus Forecast modeled sales tax impacts based on our analysis of previous recessions plus a review of industry, economist, and news reports. HDL modified percentages to reflect the tax retailer business base specifically for the City of San Rafael. Business-level sales tax data from the State SAN RAFAEL CITY COUNCIL AGENDA REPORT / Page: 8 reflecting the first weeks of this crisis arrives at the end of May; however, data reflecting the April-June impacts will not be available until August. With the assistance of HDL, recurring sales tax revenues are estimated to fall from $21.8 million as originally projected in the FY 2019-20 budget, to $18.7 million in FY 2020-21, a reduction of $3.1M. Sales taxes account for about 25% of the City’s General Fund revenues. Revenues from the Transactions & Use tax (Measure E), which applies to most local retail sales, are estimated to fall from $12.2 million as originally projected in the FY 2019-20 budget, to $10.1 million in FY 2020-21, a reduction of $2.1M. One-third of these funds are allocated to service debt related to the 2018 Lease Revenue Bonds. Measure E revenues account for about 13% of the City’s General Fund revenues. Property Tax: Property taxes are one revenue stream that is projected to not be affected by the COVID-19 pandemic in the coming year with a projected increase of 4.4% over prior year or $26.1 million. Property tax makes up 35% of the City’s General Fund revenues. Other General Fund Revenues: Other revenues (including business tax, transient occupancy tax, development fees, permits, and charges for services) are expected to experience a decrease of 6% when compared to the prior year’s budget. These revenues account for 27% of the City’s General Fund revenues. Expenditure Trends and Assumptions: As detailed in the CERP and on page 6 of this report, The City’s immediate response to the economic downturn was to implement a variety of measures to reduce expenses and City staff have also identified additional cost-savings opportunities to be implemented over the coming months. The projected expense reductions related to these measures include: • Furloughs/Mandatory Time Off Work (MTO) for Non-Public Safety Employees - $700,000 • Voluntary Retirement Separation Program - $586,000 • 14 frozen positions - $1,400,000 • Additional department reductions to be implemented over the coming months - $4,000,000 The projected expense reductions total $6,686,000 and all have been incorporated into the proposed FY 2020-21 budget. The savings from furloughs, voluntary programs, and the 14 frozen positions have been confirmed and department reductions of an additional $4 million are still needed and as mentioned above, have been incorporated into the proposed FY 2020-21 budget. Staff continues to assess departmental reductions to ensure they align with community needs, priorities, and programs to the best of our ability. Even with all the cost reduction measures taken thus far, FY 2020-21 is still projected to have a deficit of $2.2 million, which will need to be covered by using emergency reserves. SAN RAFAEL CITY COUNCIL AGENDA REPORT / Page: 9 While the recommended actions for this staff report do not include layoffs, further positions eliminations, including layoffs may be brought forward for your consideration at subsequent Council meeting(s). As the City continues its efforts in decreasing expenses, it continues to collaborate with the County and all Marin cities and towns to evaluate opportunities for savings through partnerships, shared services, and/or other consolidation efforts. See Attachment 3 for a listing of the City of San Rafael’s shared services with other governmental agencies as of June 2020. As noted on page 6, while several cost saving measures have been set in place, there are also new expenses. Most notably, increases in compensation based on collective bargaining contract commitments, an increase in the pension expense based on MCERA’s updated contribution rates, and an increase in debt service as the Public Safety Center is expected to be placed in service sometime in the fall. Pension expenses represent approximately 15% of total city-wide expenditures and approximately 20% of general fund expenditures, or $16.3 million. Capital Spending and Other Funds Capital Improvement Program (CIP) The CIP is a multi-year planning tool used to identify and implement the City’s capital needs over the upcoming 3-year period: FY 2020-21 through FY 2021-23. The CIP document summarizes the City’s planned capital and infrastructure improvement projects, including their funding sources, and prioritizes projects after analysis and coordination with other City departments in order to ensure that all department needs are represented. New to the CIP development process this year was the creation of a working group consisting of staff from various City departments. The working group met to discuss proposed projects and rank them based on the following criteria: 1) health/safety/liability; 2) priority initiatives/City goals; 3) time sensitive funds; and 4) maintain/enhance functionality. Furthermore, these four criteria were all weighted, with the category of health/safety/liability worth 35% of the overall points available. The CIP is intended to provide a comprehensive three-year project list for the City’s known capital and infrastructure needs. The general categories within the CIP are as follows: • City-Owned Properties: City facilities including buildings, parking garages and lots • Drainage: Stormwater systems including roadway drainage and the City’s 12 stormwater pump stations • Parks: Park infrastructure and facilities including playgrounds, recreation equipment, and restrooms • Streets/Transportation: Roadway improvements including construction, resurfacing, and maintenance of existing bicycle and pedestrian facilities including sidewalks and bike lanes. • Transportation: Transportation projects are separated out from Streets/Transportation projects. Transportation projects include traffic and signal improvements that increase traffic flow and capacity, as well as any circulation improvements that expand bicycle/pedestrian thoroughfare beyond the existing facilities in place. For example, new multi-use pathways and the expansion of existing sidewalk. On May 18, 2020, Public Works presented the preliminary three-year CIP for Fiscal Year (FY) 2020-21 through FY 2022-23 for discussion and review by the City Council. The purpose of this presentation was SAN RAFAEL CITY COUNCIL AGENDA REPORT / Page: 10 to provide the community members and the City Council an opportunity to participate in reviewing and sharing feedback relating to the CIP. CIP Active Projects: Active projects are separated from the rest of the CIP project list since they are fully funded with prior year funds, and construction or design may be fully underway. A total of 15 projects are listed as Active in the CIP, including: • Essential Facilities: Public Safety Center • Sea level rise vulnerability study • San Quentin pump station reconstruction (design) • Pickleweed Park and Schoen Park improvements • Shoreline Park restroom • Street resurfacing FY 2018-19 • NB 101 offramp-second right turn lane (design) • Second and Third Street queue cutters Major new projects identified in the FY 2020-21 to FY 2022-23 CIP include: • Third Street Safety Improvements Project • Francisco Blvd West Multi-use Pathway Phase II Project • Schoen Park Modifications • Canal Neighborhood Pedestrian Improvements • Woodland Avenue Retaining Wall • San Rafael High School Crosswalk Improvements • Southern Heights Blvd at Courtright Rd Retaining Wall • Park and Recreation Master Plan • Fifth Avenue and Garden Parking Lot Resurfacing • City Hall Council Chambers Accessibility and Security Improvements There are currently twelve major annual funding sources for the CIP: Figure 2 Fund # Fund Name Description 205 Stormwater Fund Established to fund stormwater maintenance, programs, and improvements throughout the City. Fund #205 receives annual revenues from the City’s Stormwater Activity fee (Municipal Code Chapter 9.40). 206 Gas Tax; Measure AA; Senate Bill 1 Funds The Gas Tax is revenue collected and subsequently distributed by the State of California based on a percentage tax on each gallon of gas purchased in San Rafael. Gas Tax may be used for capital projects or maintenance on local streets, roads, traffic, and bicycle/pedestrian facilities. Additionally, local sales tax, passed by voters in 2018 as Measure AA, contributes to a portion of this fund for roadway improvement projects. 208 Childcare Fund Projects identified in the CIP as utilizing Childcare Funds are restricted to facility improvements at the City’s childcare centers. SAN RAFAEL CITY COUNCIL AGENDA REPORT / Page: 11 235 Baypoint Lagoon Assessment District The Baypoint Lagoons Lighting and Landscape District was formed to protect and enhance wildlife habitat and water quality in Baypoint (Spinnaker) Lagoon and the adjacent diked salt marsh. 236 Loch Lomond Assessment District The Loch Lomond (Melo‐Roos) Assessment District was established in 1992 to pay for the repair and maintenance of the stormwater system infrastructure in the District. 240 Parkland Dedication This fund was established to account for long‐term developer deposits used to acquire and increase capacity of the City’s park infrastructure. 241 Measure A Measure A is a nine‐year ¼ percent transactions and use tax managed by the County of Marin. The tax is restricted to care for parks and open spaces. The Department of Library and Recreation, in consultation with the Parks and Recreation Commission, provides input each year as to which parks projects should be prioritized to receive Measure A funding. 246 Traffic Mitigation Fee Traffic Mitigation Fees are an impact fee charged to a developer in connection with the approval of a private land development project with the purpose of offsetting or subsidizing public improvements made necessary by the private development. The City utilizes Traffic Mitigation Fees for circulation‐related projects identified in the General Plan. 420 Measure E Measure E was passed by San Rafael voters in November 2013 extending an existing 0.5% sales tax for 20 years and adding 0.25% (25 cents on a $100 purchase). In February 2014, the City Council directed staff to set aside the revenues from the added quarter percent to fund public safety facilities improvements. 501 Parking Services Projects identified in the CIP as utilizing Parking Services Funds are restricted to parking‐related projects, including maintenance and upgrades at City parking garages and parking lots. 603 Building Maintenance The Building Maintenance Fund supports routine maintenance and capital projects associated with the City’s buildings, parks and other facilities. The Building Maintenance Fund is an internal revenue fund, which means General Fund monies are the sole source of revenue. Grants (various) The City actively seeks grant funding for capital projects and programs. Grant funding is available from regional, state, and federal agencies for safety, transportation, emergency response, and other types of projects. While several CIP projects are grant‐funded, most are not and are paid for through Funds 205 (Stormwater), 206 (Gas Tax), 246 (Traffic Mitigation), and 603 (Building Maintenance). Within each fund type is an Operating Budget which consists of expenses related to maintenance of infrastructure, equipment purchasing, miscellaneous contractual services, Annual Programs, and other non‐project related work. Additionally, after deducting the Operating Budget from the total available funding in each fund type, staff allocated a 15‐percent contingency of the remaining funds to provide a buffer for SAN RAFAEL CITY COUNCIL AGENDA REPORT / Page: 12 unanticipated expenses which may arise mid‐year. The public health state of emergency due to the COVID‐19 pandemic has created severe financial burdens for the City, its residents and businesses. Inevitably, this economic downturn is resulting in a dramatic reduction of the City’s revenues, impacting CIP funding revenues in Funds 206 (Gas Tax), 208 (Childcare), 241 (Measure A‐Parks), and 501 (Parking Services). The proposed projects in this year’s CIP represent those projects staff can deliver based on revenue assumptions at this time, including known projected reductions. Staff plan to track revenues throughout the fiscal year to determine if additional reductions in project budgets are necessary. As has been noted in prior year CIPs, the long-term capital and infrastructure improvement needs for City-owned property, parks, and drainage far exceed the available revenues each year. Therefore, a considerable number of projects are identif ied as real capital and infrastructure needs (and maintained on the CIP project list) but are categorized as “Unfunded”. Historically, staff transfers $400,000 each year from the Gas Tax to the General Fund to support personnel related costs of Streets Maintenance staff, which we propose to do again this year. Personnel costs of employees performing street and road maintenance and repairs total over $2M annually in the General Fund and are an allowable use of State gas tax monies. Due to the economic uncertainty caused by the COVID-19 virus and need for additional General Fund support, staff propose an additional one- time transfer of $1,246,000 to the General Fund to more fully support personnel costs for street maintenance crews supporting Gas Tax projects above and beyond the annual $400,000 contribution. The complete, final draft of the CIP is attached to this report (Attachment 3). Capital Project Funds These funds are dedicated to the tracking and reporting of capital projects. The most significant capital project activity is the Public Safety Essential Facilities program, for which there are active projects associated with the construction of the new Public Safety Center and the rehabilitation of Fire Stations 54 and 55. This project has been funded from the following sources: (1) direct use of designated Measure E general tax funds; (2) Lease Revenue Bonds, Series 2018, which will be repaid from designated Measure E general tax funds; and (3) allocations from the paramedic tax used to fund capital projects. In FY 2020-21, the City expects to spend approximately $8.4 million in construction costs in support of this program’s completion. Special Revenue and Grant Funds These funds have restricted uses, based on their respective sources. One significant fund in this group is the Emergency Medical Services/Paramedic Fund (EMS), which was presented to the City Council on June 1, 2020. The fund has planned expenditures of $8.1 million for the upcoming fiscal year, of which $5.1 million, or 63%, comes from the Paramedic Tax. The balance of the funding of this activity comes primarily from third-party recovery for emergency medical response and transport services. The spending plan requires no change in the level of support from taxpayers in San Rafael, County Services Area #13, and County Services Area #19, and Marinwood Community Services District. The EMS fund is projected to retain $814,298 in unallocated fund balance on June 30, 2021. This balance serves as an operational reserve equal to ten percent of expenditures. Funds not needed for the operations reserve are used to fund capital improvements that directly support the delivery of emergency medical transport services (e.g., Phase II essential public facilities projects, such as Fire Stations 54 and 55). SAN RAFAEL CITY COUNCIL AGENDA REPORT / Page: 13 The City’s Cannabis Business Tax is also reported in a special revenue fund. San Rafael has several licensees in active commerce. The City anticipates the receipt of $300,000 in excise tax revenues for the FY 2020-21 year in which the fund will incur $300,000 in qualifying expenses. The program is expected to generate revenues of approximately $375,000 as it is forecasted to generate associated sales tax and licensing fees of $75,000 received by the general fund. The Measure A Open Space Program is in its eighth year. Funding for this activity is primarily provided by a nine-year, county-wide sales tax that is managed by the County of Marin, with the City providing discretionary contributions as needed. The focus for FY 2020-21, for which $365.5 thousand in revenues is projected, remains on park capital improvements and open-space enjoyment and safety. The FY 2020- 21 Measure A – Open Space Workplan was presented and approved separately at the City Council meeting of May 18, 2020. Measure D, the successor Library parcel tax to Measure C, is entering its fourth year. This special revenue source has successfully expanded service levels, relative to those established under Measure C (previous Library parcel tax). The purpose of the tax is to “augment the capacity of the City of San Rafael to provide quality library services to its residents.” Measure D provides for expanded book and periodical purchases, including e-books; funds events and classes for all ages, and provides for supplementary technology supplies. Capital reserves were established under Measure C (previous Library parcel tax) for facility-related uses. The Recreation and Childcare Funds are anticipating spending plans of $3.9 million and $4.7 million, respectively. As a result of the financial burden caused by COVID-19, is assumed these programs will come in under budget in both revenues and expenses. As this point, the target is moving too rapidly for staff to make an accurate prediction on either. Staff will be updating Council on the activity of these funds over the next several months. Voter approved Measure C, will fund the Marin Could Wildfire Prevention Authority for ten years, starting with its first full year of operations in FY 2020-2021. An estimated $4.56 million will be allocated to the City of San Rafael annually. This funding cannot be supplanted with current and ongoing expenditures used for wildfire prevention and this funding will be used to provide new, improved, and expediated services for the prevention of wildfire. During the first year of operations, while the tax is being collected and distributed to each agency, the City will dry fund approximately $900,000 to support coordinated wildfire prevention including early detection, warning and alerts; reducing vegetation; ensuring defensible space around homes, neighborhoods and critical infrastructure; and improving disaster evacuation routes/procedures. Other significant funds in this category include Gas Tax and Storm Water Funds. The spending plans for these funds were developed in conjunction with the Capital Improvement Program described previously. Parking Fund The Parking Fund is a self-sustaining enterprise fund whose revenues are dedicated to parking services. Currently, parking operations are funded via parking fees and fines, and fund balance is the only resource with which to cover capital improvements. The parking structures and lots have deferred maintenance issues that will need to be addressed in the coming years. In 2014, the Public Works Department engaged an engineering firm to evaluate current conditions of the garage structures and provide recommendations for repair and maintenance items. The study determined that the four city-owned structures (3rd/Lootens, SAN RAFAEL CITY COUNCIL AGENDA REPORT / Page: 14 3rd/A, 3rd/C, 5th/C parking structures) require significant structural repairs due to deferred maintenance. The FY 2020-21 operating budget for this fund is $5.1 million, inclusive of operating transfers. Internal Service Funds and Capital Replacement Funds These funds are used to manage services that are delivered within the organization. For example, computer replacement, employee benefits, workers compensation, general liability and vehicle replacement are funded via internal charges to the funds that utilize these respective services. These funds have sufficient resources to support services for FY 2020-21. The technology internal service fund and capital replacement funds remain underfunded with respect to the City’s anticipated long-term needs. Successor Agency Prior to the state-initiated dissolution of the Redevelopment Agency in January 2012, the City Council met as the Redevelopment Agency and approved its annual budget as part of the citywide budget process. Under the current legislation, the Successor Agency is not required to prepare an annual budget. Funding for the Successor Agency follows a different process specified in the new law: funding must be approved by the Successor Agency’s Oversight Board and the California Department of Finance for six- month periods. The economic development-related functions of the former Redevelopment Agency have been fully transferred to the City Manager’s Office. The San Rafael Successor Agency Oversight Board has approved allowable administrative expenses of $144,000 in FY 2020-21 for City staff time and other costs associated with the dissolution of the former Redevelopment Agency, although this amount is expected to be reduced, and eventually eliminated, in future years. The Successor Agency reimburses the General Fund $190,443 per year under a repayment plan for the unfunded pension obligations of former Redevelopment Agency employees. Status of Pension Funding The City’s Pension Funding Policy requires that the Finance Director and City Manager report on the status of pension funding as part of the annual budget adoption process. The most recent pension actuarial valuation was prepared as of June 30, 2019 and approved by the MCERA Board on February 4, 2020. This valuation was used to determine the contribution rates for FY 2020-21. The composite rate for the City of San Rafael will be 60.77 percent, a 6 percent increase from the current rate of 57.67 percent. The budgeted pension contribution for FY 2020-21 provides full funding for the required contribution. The valuation also reported an unfunded actuarial liability of $137.2 million for the City, representing a funded ratio of 77.3%. MCERA’s investment target (discount rate) is 7.00%. The City has dedicated a portion of its employee retirement reserve to buffer the impact of unexpected increases. This reserve, which currently totals $2.7 million, is also used to accumulate payments for debt service on the $4.5 million pension obligation bonds issued in 2010; and for optional, supplementary payments to MCERA. Status of Other Postemployment Benefit (OPEB) Funding (Retiree Healthcare) The City’s OPEB Funding Policy was adopted on September 18, 2017. The Policy cites the City’s goal of fully funding the Actuarially Determined Contribution (ADC) each year. The budgeted OPEB contribution for FY 2019-20 provides full funding for the required contribution. The contribution is based SAN RAFAEL CITY COUNCIL AGENDA REPORT / Page: 15 on an investment target (discount rate) of 6.75%. The most recent actuarial valuation, as of June 30, 2019, reports $21.8 million in plan assets offset by $48.3 million in actuarially accrued liabilities, leaving an unfunded actuarial liability of $26.5 million. The City’s ADC for FY 2020-21 is $3.0 million. Citywide Summary The following table summarizes the appropriations found in Exhibit I of the Resolution (Attachment 2), which provides the schedule of consolidated fund activities for FY 2020-21: Figure 3 The funds listed in Figure 3 below, except for the General Fund, are all restricted in nature based on the explanations starting at page 9 of this report. Fund Projected Balance July 1, 2020 Sources (Revenues and Transfers) Uses (Expenditures and Transfers) Projected Balance June 30, 2021 General Fund $ (721,542) $ 79,398,300 $ 81,581,228 $ (2,904,470) General Plan 1,359,111 776,956 1,464,130 671,937 Special Revenue/Grant/Trust 16,279,889 27,484,518 32,877,061 10,887,346 Enterprise (Parking) 2,079,136 5,076,525 5,072,452 2,083,209 Internal Service/Capital Replacement 8,444,373 16,657,617 17,238,594 7,863,396 Assessment Districts 474,033 - - 474,033 Misc Capital Project Funds 11,380,954 642,394 9,517,225 2,506,123 Adj for ISF Charges/Transfers - (19,806,777) (19,806,777) - Total City-Wide Totals $ 39,295,954 $ 110,229,533 $ 127,943,913 $ 21,581,574 Under the proposed FY 2020-21 budget, all funds other than the General Fund are projected to have a positive fund balance as of July 1, 2020, as well as at June 30, 2021. General Fund Balance and Reserves As of July 1, 2020, the General Fund is projected to have a negative fund balance of $721,542 after exhausting all one-time funds available from prior years. Similarly, with projected losses of approximately $2.2 million for FY 2020-21, the cumulative general fund negative balance is $2,904,470 as of June 30, 2021. General fund Net needs Projected net needs as of June 30, 2020 $ (721,542) Projected net needs as of June 30, 2021 (2,182,928) Cumulative net needs through June 30, 2021 $ (2,904,470) Use of emergency reserve funds through June 30, 2021 $ 2,904,470 To date, General Fund Emergency Reserves are $7.9 million. Staff propose allocating $2,904,470 of emergency reserves to address the general fund deficit spanning both fiscal years. If approved, this will leave a balance of $4,995,530 million, or 6.3% of General Fund budgeted expenditures. SAN RAFAEL CITY COUNCIL AGENDA REPORT / Page: 16 When the CERP was presented on May 18th, $3.6 of emergency reserves was estimated at that time for what would be needed to fund the budget deficits. Fortunately, the combination of an unexpected increase in ERAF payments from the State and a reduction in projected overtime costs in FY 2019-20, resulted in a reduction in the amount of emergency reserves needed at this time. GANN APPROPRIATIONS LIMIT The Appropriations Limit for each year is based on the prior year Appropriations Limit, adjusted by factors that incorporate changes in cost of living and population. For FY 2020-21, the City is using a 3.73 percent increase in California’s per capita personal income from January 1, 2019 to January 1, 2020 (this figure is provided by the California Department of Finance). For the change in population, the City is using negative 0.60 percent – representing the change in population for Marin County, which is higher than San Rafael’s figure of negative 0.66 percent for the period January 1, 2019 to January 1, 2020 (provided by the State of California Department of Finance). The attached resolution (Attachment 5) establishes the new Appropriations Limit for FY 2020-21, which has been calculated to be $143,208,909 (Exhibit A to the resolution). The actual budget subject to the limitation excludes self-supporting funds, capital improvement funds, capital outlay grant funds, and specific exclusions such as the Gas Tax Fund. The FY 2020-21 appropriations subject to the GANN Limit is $73,554,079 (Exhibit B to the resolution). Therefore, the portion of the City’s budget appropriation that is restricted by the GANN limit is $69,654,830 under the legal limit. STAFFING Fiscal Year 2019-20 The City’s current approved level of staffing for FY 2019-20 is 405.23 FTE (full-time equivalent), which is 9 percent below the peak of 445 FTE that was supported in FY 2007-08. The erosion of staffing levels has significantly reduced the City’s organizational capacity and impedes the City’s ability to proactively manage emerging issues, or to insure consistent continuity of services. The management team has considered the impact of the severe restructuring on the City’s ability to effectively and sustainably deliver services upon which the residents depend and continues to explore and implement strategies to fulfill the community’s expectations. During FY 2019-20, the Police Department identified a need to support the community by adding two positions to the department: 1. School Resource Officer (fully grant funded) 2. Open Space Ranger (fully funded by Measure C) 1. School Resource Officer. To support the cost of the School Resource Officer position, the City’s Police Department entered into discussions with the San Rafael City School Superintendent (SRCS) to explore funding sources and identified a grant option supported by State funding. The application for this three-year grant was submitted, and accepted, thereby enabling the City to move forward with recruitment efforts for this School Resource Officer position. The grant amount for the first year is $175,515, followed by $179,025 and $188,066 for the next two years. Prior to the grant expiring, the SRCS plans to apply for a grant renewal for an additional two years. If the grant is unable to be extended, or the SAN RAFAEL CITY COUNCIL AGENDA REPORT / Page: 17 department cannot pay for the ongoing costs, the position may be eliminated in the future. Therefore, there is no current, or ongoing fiscal impact for this new position. 2. Open Space Ranger. In March 2020, voters passed Measure C, the Marin Wildfire Prevention Measure. As a member of the Marin Wildfire Prevention Authority, the City is entitled to use proceeds from the tax for new eligible activities and services. The annual cost of the Open Space Ranger position is approximately $176,248 per year, which is supported by Measure C proceeds. Lastly, staff recommends a reduction of 1.5 FTE as part of the proposed changes to the City’s staffing levels for FY 2019-20. These are the elimination of a .80 FTE fixed term Evidence Technician for the police department and a 0.70 FTE Network Support Technician in Digital Services and Open Government. In summary, the FY 2019-20 personnel proposal ends with 405.73 full-time employees, which is an increase of 0.5 FTE with no additive fiscal impact. This recommended proposal of 405.73 FTE will roll into FY 2020-21. Fiscal Year 2020-21 For FY 2020-21, all departments are focused on finding ways to maximize the capacity of our current staff by re-examining the way that our teams are currently organized, and by creatively implementing process improvements cross departmentally. This is especially important as 14 vacant positions have been frozen and an additional 11 positions were approved as part of the Voluntary Retirement Separation Program. The City accepted 11 early retirement applications, which resulted in a net savings of approximately $586,000. This estimate assumes that all applicants do not revoke their interest within the revocation period available to them, which will end on July 27th, 2020. The Police Sergeant and Police Call Taker are deemed essential due to their public safety affiliation and will be rehired at a lower total compensation amount because they are PEPRA employees replacing Classic employees, therefore there will still be associated savings. The final list of accepted applications corresponds to the positions listed below: SAN RAFAEL CITY COUNCIL AGENDA REPORT / Page: 18 Furloughs The City’s labor negotiations team also implemented a city-wide mandatory furlough, as described in the non-public safety collective bargaining agreements. represented and unrepresented groups will be participating in this mandatory furlough starting the new fiscal year. By bargaining group, the percentage of wage reductions for FY 2020-21 will be as follows: 1. WCE Bargaining Group – 3% 2. Local 1 Confidential Bargaining Group – 3% 3. SEIU Bargaining Group – 5% 4. Unrepresented Groups – 5% 5. City Council – 5% The total anticipated savings for the city-wide mandatory furloughs is approximately $700,000. The total anticipated savings for both the Voluntary and Mandatory Programs is approximately $1,286,000. The history and detail for the 405.73 FTE/positions being proposed for FY 2020-21 are presented in Exhibit III of the resolution (Attachment 2). Accompanying Exhibit III are the salary schedules for all bargaining groups which have been updated to reflect their respective compensation increases if any and all agreed upon furlough percentage decreases. However, it is important to note that of the authorized positions of 405.73 FTE, 23 are to remain unfunded unless it can be substantiated the position is essential or there are additional funds to cover it, leaving the City with a workforce of 382.73 FTE. FISCAL IMPACT: By approving the resolutions as presented, the City Council is authorizing the levels of expenditures, within funds, for FY 2020-21. The proposed budgets reflect all assumptions outlined and incorporate direction received from the City Council and City Council Finance Subcommittee. The City is also adopting the GANN Appropriations Limit which confirms that the budgeted expenditures are within legal limits. The FY 2020-21 Budget Resolution also provides for the “roll-over” of unspent capital project funds from FY 2019-20 for projects that will not be completed by June 30, 2020. Capital project spending occurs each year by appropriating accumulated funds (e.g., gas tax, traffic mitigation, etc.), in addition to new revenue sources. By carrying over the unspent portion of a project’s budget into the subsequent year, capital project budget performance is easier to track because the same budget authority is not duplicated for unspent funds. This also makes it easier to match budgeted and actual expenditures. Similarly, the budget resolution (Attachment 2) provides for the “roll-over” of active purchase orders that will not be completed by year-end. This provides for operational continuity and avoids having to re-budget expenditures that were previously authorized. OPTIONS: The City Council can choose to either: (1) Accept the report, recommendations and resolutions as presented; or (2) Make modifications to the recommendations and/or resolutions. RECOMMENDATION: Accept the report and: 1. Adopt the Resolution Approving the Citywide Budget and Capital Improvement Program for the Fiscal Year 2020-2021 and Providing for the Appropriations and Expenditure of All Sums Set Forth in the Budget SAN RAFAEL CITY COUNCIL AGENDA REPORT / Page: 19 2. Adopt the Resolution Approving Fiscal Year 2020-2021 Gann Appropriations ATTACHMENTS: 1. COVID-19 Economic Recovery Plan 2. Resolution Approving the Citywide Budget and Capital Improvement Program for the Fiscal Year 2020-2021 and Providing for the Appropriations and Expenditure of All Sums Set Forth in the Budget, and Exhibits I, II, III (Budget and Personnel Actions) 3. Shared Services with Other Governmental Agencies 4. Capital Improvement Program: FY 2020-21 through 2022-23 5. Resolution Approving Fiscal Year 2020-2021 Gann Appropriations Limit, and Exhibits A and B Cover Page Attachment 1. – COVID-19 Economic Recovery Plan SAN RAFAEL ISRESILIENT PURPOSE The goal of the COVID-19 Economic Recovery Plan (CERP) is to communicate to San Rafael’s residents, businesses, elected officials, and the City workforce how the City plans to economically recover from this public health and subsequent financial crisis. We must respond with urgency to preserve the vitality of our City and remain resilient during these unprecedented times by controlling costs and finding innovative ways to create new revenues. This CERP describes the strategies the City has already taken to address the economic impacts of the COVID-19 Shelter in Place (SIP) orders on the City of San Rafael, both as a provider of critical government services and as a community. Additionally, it forecasts additional strategies to reduce expenses, increase revenues, and enhance the economic vitality of our City. The CERP also outlines our work plan to reopen and reinvigorate local businesses and the economy of San Rafael. EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT RESPONSE TO COVID-19 To better coordinate our response to COVID-19 and the SIP orders, the City of San Rafael has been operating our remote Emergency Operations Center (EOC) since the proclamation of a Local State of Emergency on March 10, 2020. Through the EOC, City staff has been managing the logistical and operational activities behind the City’s response to the pandemic, including public information communications, supporting non- profits and local businesses, and maintaining a continuity of government through innovative digital solutions in the face of disaster. The City has a dedicated section of the City website for resources and the latest information on COVID-19. Throughout the crisis, the City’s public safety first responders have been there for all of us responding to calls and serving as the City’s front line of defense against COVID-19. SAN R AFA E L THE C ITY WI T H A M ISSIONCOVID-19 ECONOMIC RECOVERY PLAN JUNE 2020 SAN RAFAEL COVID-19 ECONOMIC RECOVERY PLAN - JUNE 2020 1 EXAMPLES OF SAN RAFAEL EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTER (EOC) EFFORTS TO DATE Emergency Childcare Program for Essential Workers Early in the crisis the City of San Rafael’s Library and Recreation Department began providing popup childcare for healthcare workers, first responders, disaster service workers, and other essential workers working or living in the county while classroom instruction is suspended. All childcare centers are following social distancing, sanitation, and hygiene guidelines. Support for Local Businesses The City has partnered with the County of Marin, Chamber of Commerce, BID, and others to create a San Rafael Small Business COVID-19 Disaster Relief Fund to help businesses struggling to maintain cash flow and financial solvency during these unprecedented times. To date, over $200,000 has been raised and over 280 grant applications were submitted. The City has also assisted businesses to interpret the Federal CARES Act and Payroll Protection Program (PPP), provided financial and legislative advocacy, maintained a directory of open businesses on the website and is playing a leadership role in the Marin Recovers reopening plan. COVID-19 Testing and Surge Planning The City of San Rafael Office of Emergency Services and Fire Department have worked in coordination with the County of Marin Health and Human Services in the setup of drive-thru COVID-19 testing facilities and surge planning for potential increases in patient volume. Assistance for Our Vulnerable Communities Staff has worked in coordination with local service providers to set up food distribution and local lodging providers to provide shelter for people who were experiencing homelessness and who are medically vulnerable or required to be in quarantine due to exposure to COVID-19. The City has also supported food banks, blood drives, and have even turned book drops into face covering donation sites. A Neighbor to Neighbor Toolkit was created to harness the superpower of neighbors helping neighbors to get through these difficult times together. Online Access to City Services City staff has developed remote access to City services including a Virtual Recreation Center and an Online Library where you can participate in online story times, workshops, and live chat, or get books delivered to your doorstep. Many services are now being offered online such as remote access to building and planning permit applications. Equitable Access to Information and Services Staff has also worked in coordination with the County of Marin and San Rafael School District to expand internet access to students and families with limited or no access. The City has developed stronger translation services for public information to ensure public safety messaging is reaching as much of our community as possible, including regular informational videos in English and Spanish. SAN RAFAEL COVID-19 ECONOMIC RECOVERY PLAN - JUNE 2020 2 BUDGET AND FISCAL IMPACTS OF COVID-19 In addition to the health impacts of COVID-19, the restrictions put into place through the public health order have taken an unprecedented toll on our federal, state, and local economy. Economists are predicting cities such as San Rafael who are heavily reliant on sales tax, transaction and use tax (TUT), and transient occupancy tax (TOT) will endure the hardest financial hit. As of April 30, it is preliminarily projected that over the next 16 months, the City will experience reductions in revenue in the range of approximately $11,790,000, which is 14% of the City’s General Fund budget. The breakdown of this financial hit is as follows: 71% of the revenue reductions are due to loss of sales and TUT, 10% is attributed to TOT, 6% is attributed to business licenses and the remaining 13% is an accumulation of several smaller revenue generating sources. While the fiscal year 2019-20 general fund budget for operating expenses was more than $80 million, approximately $43 million or more than 53% was for the funding of public safety operations. Although staff is recommending reductions to these operations, the majority is planned to come from the non-public safety operating budget. Theoretically, if staff was asked to make cuts of $12 million solely in non-public safety areas, it would take closing down the libraries, eliminating all recreation activities, cutting community development services and we still would not get to the target amount. The economic impacts of the pandemic and shelter in place orders have a direct negative impact on our local businesses and the revenues used to operate our city. To meet our financial challenges, the City is taking steps that will create a balanced budget for fiscal year 2020-21 in line with the City Council’s goals and strategies. Budget development is guided by tenets such as: • Continually assess and improve efficiency in the delivery of services. • Manage the size and compensation of the workforce to best deliver services given our current and anticipated financial realities. • Seek additional revenues from all sources to meet the community’s expectations of a high level of service. • Collaborate with other Marin governmental agencies to consider partnerships and/or regionalized services to leverage resources and improve efficiency. REVENUE ITEM % LOSS FY 19/20 FY 20/21 TOTAL LOSSES Sales/Transaction & Use Tax 71%$4,930,000 $3,440,00 $8,370,000 Transient Occupancy Tax 10%$860,000 $290,000 $1,150,000 Business Licenses 6%$240,000 $500,000 $740,000 Permitting/Franchise/Investment Earnings 13%$1,120,000 $410,000 $1,530,000 Projected Revenue Losses as of 4/30/2020 $7,150,000 $4,640,000 $11,790,000 REVENUE LOSS ESTIMATES PROJECTED REDUCTION OVER THE NEXT 16 MONTHS $11,790,000 THAT’S ROUGHLY... $24,194,338 1/2 of our Police Department General Fund Budget for one year $18,925,306 2/3 of our Fire Department General Fund Budget for one year. $12,021,259 Our entire Department of Public Works General Fund Budget for one year. SAN RAFAEL COVID-19 ECONOMIC RECOVERY PLAN - JUNE 2020 3 There are a number of efforts and programs that will be necessary to reduce expenses and increase revenues. In an effort to meet the revenue loss estimates, the below table lists current and potential future actions. A hiring freeze has already been instituted which would result in approximately $1.4 million in savings annually. The City Council approved a mandatory furlough program for non-safety employees which is expected to save approximately $700,000 for the year. This would reduce non-public safety compensation by 5%. The City Council also approved a Voluntary Retirement Separation Program which will result in on-going salary and benefit savings to the City by not filling the vacant positions or restructuring around the vacancies. This program is expected to yield approximately $600,000 but it is completely dependent upon the number of applications and selections. The Council additionally approved a Voluntary Work Hours Reduction Program. This program will depend upon the number and position of the employees participating and would lower that employee’s base annual pay for a period of time. These measures will significantly help to address the projected General Fund deficit, however additional efforts will be needed including using one-time funds available from the prior year and use of the City’s Emergency Reserve. Following the Great Recession, the City has been able to build its Emergency Reserves from less than 3% to meet its policy of 10%. While a reserve figure of 15% or 20% would be optimal, the below chart illustrates reducing our reserve by a total of 5% (bringing it to 5%) through Fiscal Year 20/21. Even with these reductions, an additional $4.2 million could be needed to meet the estimated revenue losses on the prior page. These additional budget reductions will significantly add to the negative impacts on city services, such as described on pages six and seven. COST CUTTING MEASURES FOR FY 19/20 & FY 20/21 AMOUNT Hiring Freeze for non-public safety employees $1,420,000 Furloughs for non-public safety employees $700,000 Voluntary retirement separation program $600,000 One-time funds available from prior year $1,104,000 Emergency Reserve up to 2.5% per year for 2 years $3,766,000 Additional budget reductions $4,200,000 Estimated Sources to Fund Projected Deficit $11,790,000 EXPENSE REDUCTION RECOMMENDATIONS SAN RAFAEL COVID-19 ECONOMIC RECOVERY PLAN - JUNE 2020 4 Sales and TUT TOT Multiple smaller revenue sources Business Licenses Projected Revenue Reductions Totaling approximately $11,790,000 over the next 16 months RECOVERY STRATEGIES The City’s immediate response to the economic downturn was to implement a variety of measures to reduce expenses and City staff have also identified additional cost-savings opportunities to be implemented over the coming months. We will continue to monitor the impacts of revenue and expenses and make additional recommendations for the City Council’s consideration as the situation evolves. Actions Taken: • Implemented a hiring freeze for non-essential positions. • Left 14 positions vacant since March and all new, non- essential vacancies will remain unfilled. • Halted all non-essential/discretionary spending and projects. • Eliminated planned cost of living compensation increases for executives, management and bargaining units without closed contracts for fiscal year 2020-21. • Offered a Voluntary Retirement Separation Program that provides an incentive to encourage employees to retire earlier than they would otherwise. • Offered a Voluntary Work Hours Reduction Program which allows employees to voluntarily take time off work without pay. • Actively seeking COVID-19 related state and/or federal financial assistance through the support of our local legislators. • Implement a Mandatory Time Off Work (MTO)/Furlough Program for non-public safety employees which is a 5% pay reduction. (in progress) • Focus on re-opening the local economy and enhancing efforts on business attraction and retention during the recovery process to support businesses and increase revenues. (in progress) • Continue to pursue any federal stimulus funding made available to local governments and other grants that can provide resources for projects and other one-time needs. (in progress) • Finalize the fiscal year 2020-21 budget including reducing the Emergency Reserve to 5%, if needed, as well as implementing additional departmental reductions in expenses. (in progress) • Evaluate savings associated with the voluntary retirement, voluntary time off without pay, and mandatory furlough program to determine if reductions in force are necessary to balance the budget. • Meet with employee unions to work on collaborative ways to control costs and analyze other operational cost savings opportunities. (in progress) • Consider increasing the Paramedic Tax within the current voter-approved cap limits. • Evaluate the City’s “master fee schedule” to bring them in line with the costs of similar Bay Area agencies and insure total cost recovery of our services. (in progress) • Continue to explore and gauge community interest in other revenue generating possibilities. • Collaborate with the County and all Marin cities and towns to evaluate opportunities for savings through partnerships, shared services, and/or other consolidation efforts. (in progress) • Participate in regional groups such as Marin Recovers (and its Industry Advisory Groups) and the Marin County Council of Mayors and Councilmembers Adhoc Economic Recovery Committee that are working on reopening businesses and regional financial recovery solutions. (in progress) Actions in Progress/Future: SAN RAFAEL COVID-19 ECONOMIC RECOVERY PLAN - JUNE 2020 5 HOW WILL CITY SERVICES BE IMPACTED? The City Council adopts specific goals and strategies each year along with the budget adoption process. The goals are broken down into the following 5 categories: 1. Neighborhood & Economic Vitality 2. Quality of Life 3. Public Safety 4. Public Assets 5. Foundational Services The public health crisis has made it nearly impossible for City staff to remain focused solely on the goals/strategies developed pre-COVID-19 as the EOC and other disaster service work has been more urgent and a much higher priority in serving the community. In addition, the specific impact of the mandatory furlough means City services will need to be closed to the public for 13 calendar days during fiscal year 2020-21. Described below are some of the anticipated impacts to city services by each goal category: Neighborhood & Economic Vitality Regaining and sustaining the vibrancy of our City will be an enormous challenge in the years ahead, both as it relates to housing as well as business attraction and retention. Additionally, this goal includes the work that City staff has been successfully implementing to reduce the number of individuals experiencing homelessness in our community. Unfortunately due to job loss and economic hardships due to COVID-19 we expect to see those numbers increase. With greater needs and fewer staff resources available to help, some of the initiatives underway in this area might be slowed down and take longer to accomplish. In addition, the number of hours staff can provide public services over the counter for processing permits, etc. will be reduced and the processing of current planning development applications will be slowed. While greenhouse gas emissions are down due to the economy coming to a halt, however now is not a time to get complacent about climate change. Implementation of our Climate Change Action Plan is as important as ever. Quality of Life This category is focused on the arts, culture and recreational experiences of our community, as well as improving resident engagement and governmental transparency. Due to our revenue losses, the City may need to reduce its programs and/or operational hours at the three library locations. Staff will continue to look for ways to mitigate service impacts to the public. In addition, the City may need to reduce some of its recreation programs, services and/or hours at its community centers, if it is unable to open and/or be fully operational. There are many priority initiatives planned for the coming years to improve engagement with our Latinx community and develop a City-wide data program to monitor the success of City services. City staff may need to be re-directed to focus on critical/essential delivery of services, which may result in the deferral or reduced pace of progress in these areas. SAN RAFAEL COVID-19 ECONOMIC RECOVERY PLAN - JUNE 2020 6 Public Safety We will continue to provide critical public safety services, protect our most vulnerable populations, and prioritize maintaining as much funding toward these activities as possible. However, due to the need to reduce budget in both police and fire we will need to defer equipment and vehicle purchase which in the longer term can become a safety issue. In addition, there will be less resources available for professional development/ training available for our police officers and fire fighters. In addition, the Police Department’s cadet program will be on hold which is a key strategy for identifying up and coming talent and training and retaining new public safety officers. Public Assets After years of deferred maintenance due to the Great Recession, the City was beginning to make progress in improving our roads and parks. Unfortunately, this economic crisis will result in continued deferral of maintenance projects of the City’s key facilities, such as the downtown San Rafael and Terra Linda community centers. With significant projected losses in gas taxes coming from the State, as well as reductions of other funding sources, the City’s Capital Improvement Program will be impacted and fewer core infrastructure projects will be able to be accomplished in the coming year. In addition, the City may not be able to implement another sidewalk application program this year, resurfacing of streets is likely to be reduced, and we will not be able to make improvements to outdated park structures and public restrooms. Foundational Services The City has a focus on exemplary service which relates to creating and sustaining a high performing team and improving our technology and digital presence. Our Together San Rafael culture initiative has grown over the last few years and has received significant awards from state and national organizations. Staff will continue to prioritize innovation and service design improvements, but it can’t be ignored that there will be far fewer staff carrying out initiatives. For example, existing staff will be needed to backfill for the many current and future vacant positions due to the hiring freeze. While our City staff work to adapt services that meet health and safety requirements and move services online, enhancing our technological infrastructure and some improvements to digital services may need to wait until new revenue sources can be found for more costly projects. Delays in technology investments, enhancements, and automation will have a direct impact on efforts to improve service delivery. SAN RAFAEL COVID-19 ECONOMIC RECOVERY PLAN - JUNE 2020 7 GETTING TO ECONOMIC RECOVERY The novel coronavirus is causing major disruptions to businesses and communities across the world. COVID-19 is compromising supply chains, workers’ hours and income, and demand for products and services as consumers are encouraged to avoid public places. Economic recovery requires a safe start and healthy workforce. Workplaces will continue to look and operate differently. Continued physical distancing, teleworking, and other measures will continue to be necessary to keep workers and customers safe. A phased approach: Businesses should be prepared for a phased comeback approach which will start with the State of California, and then be customized by the County of Marin, to meet the specific needs of our community. Industries and venues will be reopen based on their ability to address health risks and comply with the state and county orders. Maintain physical distancing and other public health requirements: Businesses and public spaces will need to maintain physical distancing and make modifications as necessary to keep employees, customers and the public safe. PREPARING FOR A PHASED REOPENING Leverage lessons learned: Apply best practices from industries and businesses that have adjusted to new COVID-19 safety standards. Listen & Learn: Engage with the business community to understand challenges and evolve our approach based on what we learn. Assist small businesses: Help prepare restaurants, retail and service businesses, and manufacturers, that are critical to local economies, understand changing health and safety protocols. Support the recovery of regional economies: Develop and use a data-based approach to determine support needed by sector and region to assist with recovery. SAN RAFAEL COVID-19 ECONOMIC RECOVERY PLAN - JUNE 2020 8 ECONOMIC RECOVERY San Rafael’s quality-of-life is maintained and sustained by a healthy local economy. The City’s beautiful natural setting, sense of community, public safety, recreation facilities, and efficient government is supported by municipal revenues. These unprecedented times require us to respond swiftly to maintain the strength of our City while controlling costs and being innovative in stabilizing revenues. Staff will be focused on long-term COVID-19 business recovery, advancing key development projects including affordable and workforce housing, conducting business outreach and education, and keeping local partnerships strong. Continued business outreach, education, and marketing/promotions. Partner with Chamber, BID, commercial property owners, merchants, developers, and brokers to support our existing commercial businesess base throughout the entire city and achieve our economic goals. Develop a post-COVID-19 economic development recovery strategy Work with our community partners to advance a comprehensive and forward-looking strategy to stimulate the economic vitality of San Rafael in the post-COVID world. Stimulate business growth through retention, expansion, and advancing new development projects: • Encourage business growth, private investment, and economic vitality including but not limited to: in-fill development, biotech, large format stores, hotel/lodging • Create local employment opportunities • Expand cannabis licenses and license types • Improve the fiscal condition of the City by expanding the tax base Business Recovery Support: • Ensure businesses have a strong voice in the State and local reopening protocols and get people back to work. • Directly assist our local businesses in taking advantage of Federal, State and Local recovery programs. • Partner with the Chamber of Commerce and BID to find creative out-of-the-box ways to support our local businesses to maintain their viability. • Continue to invest in our business ecosystem including infrastructure improvements (e.g. Third Street project, East and West Francisco Boulevards) and beautification efforts. ACTIONS UNDERWAY | ACTIONS TAKEN • Continuing to communicate available small business federal, state, and local COVID-19 disaster relief and recovery programs • Improving revenue stability by communicating business reopening health and safety protocols • Promoting which San Rafael businesses are “Open for business” to the community • Partnered with the County of Marin, the San Rafael Chamber of Commerce, BID and others to administer Small Business COVID-19 Disaster Relief Grants to San Rafael businesses • Participating and advancing the County’s Marin Recovers plan and taking part in the County of Marin’s Retail Industry Advisory Group GETTING TO A SUSTAINED RECOVERY. SAN RAFAEL COVID-19 ECONOMIC RECOVERY PLAN - JUNE 2020 9 ~ SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS The City of San Rafael faces serious financial challenges to recover from the COVID-19 public health emergency and due to the unprecedented nature of this economic downturn, we will need to remain vigilant about updating our financial projections and assumptions in order to ensure we are doing enough. As economic conditions change our staff will continue to develop solutions that balance our expenses with available resources. We have an amazing team who will work diligently to find innovative ways to keep our organization operating and providing the highest quality services to our community possible. However, we will face challenges in maintaining pre-COVID service levels with less funding and fewer staff to provide services. We will do our very best to continue building trust with our community and will always looks for something we can say yes to. And we will take every necessary action to ensure the City’s finances and operations remain resilient moving forward. The City Council will move forward with the efforts outlined in this plan and will adopt the fiscal year 2020-21 budget in June. This plan will also be amended as necessary to keep up with the rapidly changing COVID-19 crisis environment. Progress reports will be prepared as part of the City’s regular updates to the City Council. We will also provide updates regularly in the City Manager’s Snapshot e-newsletter. QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS If you have questions or comments about the Economic Recovery Plan you can make them online at the City Website. SAN RAFAEL ISRESILIENT SAN RAFAEL COVID-19 ECONOMIC RECOVERY PLAN - JUNE 2020 10 Cover Page Attachment 2. - Resolution Approving the City-Wide Budget and Capital Improvement Program for the Fiscal Year 2019-2020 and Providing for the Appropriations and Expenditure of All Sums Set Forth in the Budget, and Exhibits I, II, III (Budget and Personnel Actions) Exhibit I - City of San Rafael Consolidated Funds FY 2020-2021 Exhibit II – General Fund Proposed Budget FY 2020-2021 Exhibit III – City of San Rafael Authorized Positions FY 2020-2021 • San Rafael Unrepresented Executive Management Salary Schedule • PEU Local – 1 – Confidential Salary Schedule • San Rafael Unrepresented Mid-Management Salary Schedule • City of San Rafael SEIU – Salary Schedule • San Rafael Firefighters’ Association Base Pay Schedule • San Rafael Fire Chief Officers’ Association Salary Schedule • San Rafael Police Association Salary Schedule • 2020 San Rafael Police Mid-Management Association Salary Schedule • WCE – San Rafael Salary Schedule 1 RESOLUTION NO. 14830 A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF SAN RAFAEL APPROVING THE CITYWIDE BUDGET AND CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 2020-2021 AND PROVIDING FOR THE APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURE OF ALL SUMS SET FORTH IN THE BUDGET IN THE AMOUNT OF $127,943,913 WHEREAS, on May 12, 2020 and June 9, 2020, the City Council Finance Committee discussed the proposed City-wide Operating budget for the fiscal year July 1, 2020 – June 30, 2021; and WHEREAS, on May 18, 2020, City staff presented to the San Rafael City Council at its regular meeting a draft COVID-19 Economic Recovery Plan for the fiscal year July 1, 2020 - June 30, 2021; and WHEREAS, on May 18, 2020, City staff submitted to the San Rafael City Council at its regular meeting a Preliminary Capital Improvement Program for the fiscal year July 1, 2020 – June 30, 2021; and WHEREAS, after examination, deliberation and due consideration of the COVID-19 Economic Recovery Plan, Capital Improvement Program, City-wide Operating Budget and corresponding staff recommendations, the San Rafael City Council and City Council Finance Committee provided direction to the City Manager, and the City Manager has submitted a Final, Proposed Budget; and WHEREAS, it is the intention of this Council to adopt the Proposed Budget submitted by the City Manager as the approved budget for the fiscal year 2020-2021; and WHEREAS, it is the intention of this Council to carry forward unspent capital projects resources funded in fiscal year 2019-2020 to complete the balance of these projects in the 2020-2021 fiscal year; and WHEREAS, it is the intention of this Council to carry forward unspent operational funds from fiscal year 2019-2020 encumbered through approved, active purchase orders to complete the balance of these purchases in the 2020-2021 fiscal year; NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the San Rafael City Council that: 1. The City Manager’s proposed one-year budget for the City of San Rafael for the fiscal year July 1, 2020 through June 30, 2021, is hereby adopted, with net appropriations of $127,943,913. General Fund operational uses total $81,581,228 as presented in Exhibit II attached hereto and incorporated herein. A total of $1,464,130 is 2 appropriated for General Plan support, $32,877,061 is appropriated for special revenue and grant activities, $5,072,452 for the parking enterprise, $9,517,225 for capital projects, and $17,238,594 for internal service funds and asset replacement as presented in Exhibit I attached hereto and incorporated herein. 2. The sums of money therein set forth are hereby appropriated from the revenues of the City to the departments, functions, programs and funds therein set forth for expenditure during the fiscal year 2020-2021. 3. The Capital Improvement Program and projects presented for implementation in fiscal year 2020-2021 are hereby approved. 4. The budget provides for an increase of 0.50 Full Time Equivalent positions resulting in 405.73 full-time equivalent, authorized positions, as presented in Exhibit III, attached hereto and incorporated herein. 5. The following personnel actions will be implemented: A. Effective Fiscal Year 2020, approve a 1.0 FTE Police Officer - School Resource Officer, covered by a three-year grant through a tobacco grant from the State of California with a salary range of $7,173 to $8,718 monthly, in the SRPA bargaining group; and B. Effective June 16, 2020, approve a 1.0 FTE Police Officer - Open Space Ranger, covered for ten years through the Marin Wildfire Prevention Authority – County of Marin Measure C funds with a salary range of $7,173 to $8,718 monthly, in the SRPA bargaining group. 6. The City of San Rafael will carry forward unspent capital project funds from fiscal year 2019-2020 and reappropriate these funds in fiscal year 2020-2021 to be used solely to pay for the remaining portion of City Council authorized expenditures for street, facility, storm drain, traffic mitigation, park and other long-term capital projects started in the 2019-2020 or prior fiscal years. 7. Transfers are authorized from the General Fund to the San Rafael Essential Facilities capital project from Measure E revenues for the purpose of funding the San Rafael Essential Facilities projects. 8. Drawdowns are authorized from the Lease Revenue Bonds, Series 2018 for the sole purpose of funding the San Rafael Essential Facilities projects as necessitated by actual authorized capital expenditures, including capitalized interest. 9. Funds set aside in the Emergency Medical Services Fund balance for the purpose of funding future capital expenditures necessary to support the facilities used to deliver emergency medical transportation and related paramedic services will be made available to qualifying capital projects. 3 I, LINDSAY LARA, Clerk of the City of San Rafael, hereby certify that the foregoing resolution was duly and regularly introduced and adopted at a regular meeting of the Council of said City on Monday, the 15th day of June 2020, by the following vote, to wit: AYES: COUNCILMEMBERS: Bushey, Colin, McCullough & Mayor Phillips NOES: COUNCILMEMBERS: None ABSENT: COUNCILMEMBERS: None LINDSAY LARA, City Clerk EXHIBIT ICITY OF SAN RAFAELTotal Total FY 2020-21 PROJECTED BUDGETJune 30, 2020 Operating OperatingJune 30, 2021FUND FUNDProjectedand Capital Transfers Total and Capital Transfers to TotalProjected#NAMEBalanceRevenue In Resources Budget Other Funds AppropriationsBalanceGENERAL OPERATING FUNDS:001 General Fund Available Balance (721,542) $75,483,680 $3,914,620 $79,398,300 $79,581,228 $2,000,000 $81,581,228 ($2,904,470)218 General Plan Special Revenue Fund 1,359,111 776,956 776,956 1,464,130 1,464,130 671,937 SPECIAL REVENUE & GRANT FUNDS:205 Storm Water Fund 130,544 836,424 836,424 840,000 840,000 126,968 206 Gas Tax 3,303,655 5,234,629 - 5,234,629 6,880,000 1,646,000 8,526,000 12,284 207 Development Services 13,041 5,000 5,000 - - 18,041 208 Child Care 1,199,579 4,220,000 4,220,000 4,320,583 4,320,583 1,098,996 210 Paramedic/EMS 794,942 8,382,750 8,382,750 8,143,000 220,394 8,363,394 814,298 216 Cannabis 5,973 300,000 300,000 300,000 300,000 5,973 217 State Lands Fund 260,396 40,000 40,000 - - 300,396 222 Recreation Revolving 78,526 1,868,377 2,000,000 3,868,377 3,869,168 3,869,168 77,735 223 Household Haz. Waste Fund 301,168 180,470 180,470 176,836 176,836 304,802 228 Hazardous Materials Fund 55,251 - - - - 55,251 234 Pt. San Pedro A.D. Maintenance Portion 106,030 145,000 145,000 168,200 168,200 82,830 235 Baypoint Lagoons L & L Assessment District 364,329 29,500 29,500 229,278 229,278 164,551 236 Loch Lomond CFD #10 747,971 33,399 33,399 10,929 6,928 17,857 763,513 237 Loch Lomond Marina CFD #2 358,040 85,000 85,000 172,500 9,000 181,500 261,540 240 Parkland Dedication 288,016 5,000 5,000 100,000 100,000 193,016 241 Measure A Open Space 80,000 365,503 365,503 365,003 365,003 80,500 242 Measure C Wildfire Prevention (50,000) 913,226 913,226 863,226 863,226 - 495 Low and moderate Income Housing Fund 860,072 10,000 10,000 95,000 95,000 775,072 LIBRARY AND FALKIRK:214 Library Revolving 124,436 18,000 18,000 40,000 40,000 102,436 215 Library Special Assessment Fund 639,118 1,092,091 1,092,091 1,097,534 1,097,534 633,675 Library Fund 763,554 1,110,091 - 1,110,091 1,137,534 - 1,137,534 736,111 PUBLIC SAFETY:200 Abandoned Vehicle 5,540 75,100 85,000 160,100 162,146 162,146 3,494 202 Asset Seizure 1,637 - - - - 1,637 204 Crime Prevention 4,473 - - - - 4,473 230 Youth Services - Police 78,014 75,000 75,000 98,761 98,761 54,253 Public Safety Fund 89,664 150,100 85,000 235,100 260,907 - 260,907 63,857 TRAFFIC AND HOUSING:243 Affordable Housing in lieu 1,678,377 15,000 15,000 25,000 25,000 1,668,377 245 Housing & Parking In-lieu 359,332 5,000 5,000 - - 364,332 246 East S.R. Traffic Mitigation 1,464,948 600,000 600,000 1,800,000 1,800,000 264,948 Traffic & Housing Mitigation Funds 3,502,657 620,000 - 620,000 1,825,000 - 1,825,000 2,297,657 GRANT:201 A.D.A.. Access Projects - - - - - - 260 Pickleweed Childcare Grant 109,798 385,799 385,799 406,370 406,370 89,227 281 Public Safety Grants 572,914 350,000 350,000 711,200 711,200 211,714 283 Grant-Other 44,760 99,250 99,250 120,005 120,005 24,005 Grant Funds 727,472 835,049 - 835,049 1,237,575 - 1,237,575 324,946 SPECIAL REVENUE & GRANT FUND TOTAL 13,980,881 25,369,518 2,085,000 27,454,518 30,994,739 1,882,322 32,877,061 8,558,338 CONSOLIDATED FUNDS W:\Accounting and Budgeting\Budget\19‐20\Fund Sums FY19‐20\Fund Sums FY21_NAH ANALYSIS EXHIBIT ICITY OF SAN RAFAELTotal Total FY 2020-21 PROJECTED BUDGETJune 30, 2020 Operating OperatingJune 30, 2021FUND FUNDProjectedand Capital Transfers Total and Capital Transfers to TotalProjected#NAMEBalanceRevenue In Resources Budget Other Funds AppropriationsBalanceCONSOLIDATED FUNDS ASSESSMENT DISTRICTS:302 Financing Authority 1997 Bonds 151,695 - - - - 151,695 304 Peacock Gap Assessment District 2,875 - - - - 2,875 306 Mariposa Assessment District 16,573 - - - - 16,573 Var. Assessment District Projects 302,890 - - 302,890 ASSESSMENT DISTRICT TOTAL 474,033 - - - - - - 474,033 CAPITAL PROJECT FUNDS:401 Capital Improvement 1,450,599 20,000 20,000 - 1,470,599 405 Open Space Acquisition 119,960 2,000 2,000 - - 121,960 406 Bedroom Tax 94,525 - - - - 94,525 407 Parks Capital Projects 10,824 - - - 10,824 420 Measure E - Public Safety Facilities 9,705,046 400,000 220,394 620,394 8,400,000 1,117,225 9,517,225 808,215 CAPITAL PROJECT FUND TOTAL 11,380,954 422,000 220,394 642,394 8,400,000 1,117,225 9,517,225 2,506,123 ENTERPRISE FUND:501 Parking Services-Cash Beg.Bal 2,079,136 5,076,525 5,076,525 4,534,047 538,405 5,072,452 2,083,209 ENTERPRISE FUND TOTAL 2,079,136 5,076,525 - 5,076,525 4,534,047 538,405 5,072,452 2,083,209 INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS:227 Sewer Maintenance (0) 2,832,497 2,832,497 2,832,497 2,832,497 (0) 600 Vehicle Replacement-Cash Beg.Bal 1,600,585 1,215,000 1,215,000 592,361 592,361 2,223,224 601 P.C. Replacement 1,385,731 1,858,346 1,858,346 2,172,348 2,172,348 1,071,729 602 Fire Equipment Replacement 1,063,409 141,000 141,000 131,000 131,000 1,073,409 603 Building Improvement-Cash Beg.Bal 342,743 501,000 501,000 500,000 500,000 343,743 604 Employee Benefits 354,289 699,000 699,000 939,344 939,344 113,945 605 Liability Insurance 2,434 1,814,880 1,814,880 1,790,470 1,790,470 26,844 606 Workers Compensation Insurance 58,182 2,338,324 2,338,324 2,009,722 2,009,722 386,784 607 Dental Insurance 258,327 469,218 469,218 495,000 495,000 232,545 608 Radio Replacement 59,236 648,660 648,660 703,531 703,531 4,365 609 Telephone/Internet 189,583 470,761 470,761 466,761 466,761 193,583 611 Employee Retirement 2,267,311 20,000 20,000 4,000 682,063 686,063 1,601,248 612 Retiree Health Benefit OPEB-Cash Beg.bal 521,228 3,643,931 3,643,931 3,789,497 3,789,497 375,662 613 Police Equipment Replacement Fund 341,315 5,000 5,000 130,000 130,000 216,315 INTERNAL SERVICE FUND TOTAL 8,444,373 16,657,617 - 16,657,617 16,556,531 682,063 17,238,594 7,863,397 TRUST AND AGENCY FUNDS:712 Library Fiduciary 2,299,006 30,000 30,000 - - 2,329,006 TRUST & AGENCY FUND TOTAL 2,299,006 30,000 - 30,000 - - - 2,329,006 - COMBINED FUNDS TOTAL 39,295,954 123,816,297 6,220,015 130,036,310 141,530,675 6,220,015 147,750,690 21,581,574 LESS: INTERFUND TRANSFER (6,220,015) (6,220,015) (6,220,015) (6,220,015) LESS:INTERNAL SERVICE CHARGES(13,586,762) (13,586,762) (13,586,762) (13,586,762) NET TOTALS FY 2020-2021 39,295,954 110,229,535 0 110,229,533 127,943,913 (0) 127,943,913 21,581,574 W:\Accounting and Budgeting\Budget\19‐20\Fund Sums FY19‐20\Fund Sums FY21_NAH ANALYSIS GENERAL FUND PROPOSED BUDGET FY 2020-2021 EXHIBIT II REVENUES & OTHER OPERATIONAL SOURCES Taxes Property Tax and related 21,774,484$ Sales Tax 18,685,448 Sales Tax -Measure E 10,114,552 Franchise Tax 3,767,000 Business Tax 2,582,000 Transient Occupancy Tax 2,900,000 Other Agencies CSA #19 Fire Service 2,260,604 VLF Backfill 6,240,770 Other Agencies (Prop 172, Owner Prop Tax, State Mandate, Other agencies) 1,299,466 Other Revenues Permits & Licenses (building, electrical, encroachment, use, alarm) 2,644,570 Fine & Forfeitures (traffic, vehicle, etc.) 254,895 Interest & Rents (investment earnings, rents, etc.) 175,000 Charges for Services (includes dev't fees and plan review) 1,948,142 Other Revenue (damage reimbursements, misc income) 836,750 Sub-total: Revenues 75,483,680$ TRANSFERS IN Assessment District reimbursements 15,928 from Gas Tax 1,646,000 from Parking Services Fund - Admin. cost 453,405 from Measure E for 2018 Lease Revenue Bond 1,117,225 from Employee Retirement Fund - POB debt payment 682,063 Sub-total: Transfers In 3,914,620$ TOTAL SOURCES 79,398,302$ EXPENDITURES AND OTHER OPERATIONAL USES Expenditures by Department Finance 2,509,264 Non-Departmental 7,319,231 City Manager/City Council 2,577,191 City Clerk 494,894 Digital Services 1,138,715 Mgt Serv: Adm,HR 475,071 City Attorney 1,016,599 Community Development 4,111,735 Police 24,287,913 Fire 20,426,033 Public Works 12,003,604 Library 2,621,334 Economic Development 599,644 Sub-total: Expenditures 79,581,228$ OPERATIONAL TRANSFERS OUT to Recreation Fund - Operating support 2,000,000 Sub-total: Transfers Out 2,000,000$ Non-Operating Transfers (Measure E / San Rafael Essential Facilities) - Allocation to Emergency and Cash Flow Reserve - TOTAL USES 81,581,228$ NET RESULTS (2,182,926)$ W:\Accounting and Budgeting\Budget\20-21\Council\Adopted Budget 6-15-2020\FY20-21 Gen Fund Proposed Budget-Exhibit II 6-15-2020 CITY OF SAN RAFAELAuthorized PositionsEXHIBIT IIIMid-Year ProposedFinal Final Final Final Final Final Final Final Final Final Final Final Adopted Changes Final Changes ProposedDepartments2007-20082008-20092009-20102010-20112011-20122012-20132013-20142014-20152015-20162016-20172017-20182018-20192019-20202019-20202019-20202019-20202020-2021RegularCommunity Development 29.50 27.50 21.75 20.75 18.25 18.25 17.80 17.80 19.80 20.00 21.00 21.00 21.75 21.75 21.75 Community Services 64.20 64.20 60.73 61.16 59.82 59.02 60.25 60.82 60.84 60.94 60.94 60.94 56.41 56.41 56.41 City Attorney 3.50 3.50 3.50 3.50 3.50 3.50 3.50 3.50 3.50 3.50 3.50 3.50 3.50 3.50 3.50 City Clerk 3.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 City Manager/Council 8.70 8.70 7.70 7.70 8.50 8.50 9.56 9.56 11.56 13.56 13.56 13.56 12.56 12.56 12.56 Economic Development (former RDA) 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 Finance 11.00 11.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 11.72 12.72 12.72 11.72 11.72 11.72 11.72 11.72 Fire 81.00 77.00 75.00 76.00 75.00 76.00 79.00 81.75 81.75 81.75 82.35 82.35 82.75 (0.75) 82.00 82.00 Library 20.22 21.97 20.61 26.68 21.74 21.74 23.41 23.41 23.41 23.41 23.41 23.41 23.41 (1.75) 21.66 21.66 Management Services 33.68 33.68 31.68 31.15 28.23 26.23 26.33 27.33 27.83 27.33 29.33 29.33 31.33 (1.00) 30.33 (0.70) 29.63 Police 105.00 104.00 90.00 90.00 87.00 87.00 89.00 90.00 92.00 92.80 92.00 92.00 93.30 93.30 1.20 94.50 Public Works 78.80 75.80 60.80 62.80 62.00 60.00 61.00 62.00 62.00 63.00 66.67 66.67 67.00 1.00 68.00 - 68.00 Sub - Total Regular Positions443.60 434.35 388.77 396.74 379.04 375.24 384.85 392.89 400.41 404.01 409.48 409.48 407.73 (2.50) 405.23 0.50 405.73 Change from previous year(9.25) (45.58) 7.97 (3.80) 9.61 8.04 7.52 3.60 5.47 - (1.75) (2.50) 0.50 Authorized, unbudgeted - extended absence/no cost1.00 2.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 - - - - - Total Authorized Positions 445.08 437.58 391.92 399.72 379.04 375.24 384.85 393.89 402.41 406.01 410.48 410.48 407.73 (2.50) 405.23 0.50 405.73 Vacant Frozen Positions (14.00) Frozen as part of Voluntary Retirement Separation Program (9.00) General Notes:Authorized positions less current unfunded positions 382.73 The above-authorized positions are presented as full-time equivalent employees (FTE's) based on various workweek hours as negotiated in employee agreements. The totals by department reflect a combination of full-time or permanent part-time, or fixed term positions that are entitled to all or pro-rated benefits in accordance with the negotiated agreements for employees or individuals who are under contract. The totals reflected above, or in the detail department program sections, do not includetemporary or seasonal employees that are utilized for short-term or specific reasons during the year.W:\Accounting and Budgeting\Budget\20-21\Council\Adopted Budget 6-15-2020\Budgeted Positions FY20-21 Note: The Salary Schedule below reflects a 5% furlough reduction for FY 20/21 (except Safety) Grade Position A B C D E 2501 Assistant City Attorney 10,725$ 11,261$ 11,824$ 12,415$ 13,036$ 2001 Assistant City Manager 12,686$ 13,321$ 13,987$ 14,686$ 15,420$ 2300 Community Development Director 12,377$ 12,995$ 13,645$ 14,327$ 15,044$ 4205 Director of Digital Service & Open Government 11,215$ 11,776$ 12,365$ 12,983$ 13,632$ 2801 Director of Economic Development & Innovation 11,215$ 11,776$ 12,364$ 12,983$ 13,632$ 2205 District Manager/Engineer (SRSD)11,215$ 11,776$ 12,364$ 12,983$ 13,632$ 2140 Finance Director 11,215$ 11,776$ 12,364$ 12,983$ 13,632$ 7101 Fire Chief 13,288$ 13,953$ 14,651$ 15,383$ 16,152$ 1106 Human Resources Director 11,215$ 11,776$ 12,364$ 12,983$ 13,632$ 2406 Library and Recreation Director 11,780$ 12,369$ 12,987$ 13,637$ 14,318$ 6101 Police Chief 13,288$ 13,953$ 14,651$ 15,383$ 16,152$ 2201 Public Works Director 12,377$ 12,995$ 13,645$ 14,327$ 15,044$ 18,335$ The City Manager is appointed by the City Council and is not subject to the terms and conditions of the Management Resolution SAN RAFAEL UNREPRESENTED EXECUTIVE MANAGEMENT SALARY SCHEDULE Effective July 1, 2020 Position Monthly Salary City Manager (Appointed) Note: The Salary Schedule below reflects a 3% furlough reduction for FY 20/21 Grade Position A B C D E 7122 ADMIN ASST I (CONFIDENTIAL)$4,236 $4,448 $4,670 $4,904 $5,149 7123 ADMIN ASST II (CONFIDENTIAL)$4,670 $4,904 $5,149 $5,407 $5,677 7215 ADMIN ASSISTANT TO THE CM $5,418 $5,689 $5,974 $6,272 $6,586 7207 ADMIN ASST TO THE CHIEF OF POLICE $4,790 $5,029 $5,281 $5,545 $5,822 2106 ASSOCIATE MANAGEMENT ANALYST $5,326 $5,592 $5,872 $6,166 $6,474 2109 HUMAN RESOURCES REPRESENTATIVE I $5,294 $5,558 $5,836 $6,128 $6,435 2110 HUMAN RESOURCES REPRESENTATIVE II $5,832 $6,123 $6,429 $6,751 $7,088 7242 LEGAL ASSISTANT I $5,418 $5,689 $5,974 $6,272 $6,586 9205 LEGAL ASSISTANT II $5,970 $6,269 $6,582 $6,911 $7,257 7204 MANAGEMENT ANALYST $5,859 $6,152 $6,460 $6,783 $7,122 7203 PAYROLL TECHNICIAN $5,503 $5,778 $6,067 $6,370 $6,689 7316 PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANT $7,172 $7,530 $7,907 $8,302 $8,717 2136 SENIOR ADMIN ASST (CONFIDENTIAL)$5,029 $5,280 $5,544 $5,821 $6,112 2130 SENIOR ACCOUNTANT $6,390 $6,709 $7,045 $7,397 $7,767 PEU LOCAL 1 - CONFIDENTIAL SALARY SCHEDULE Effective July 1, 2020 Note: The Salary Schedule below reflects a 5% furlough reduction for FY 20/21 Grade Position A B C D E 7315 Accounting Manager 8,265$ 8,678$ 9,112$ 9,567$ 10,046$ 2400 Assistant Library and Recreation Director 9,446$ 9,918$ 10,414$ 10,935$ 11,482$ 2202 Assistant Public Works Director / City Engineer 10,720$ 11,256$ 11,818$ 12,409$ 13,030$ 2302 Chief Building Official 9,962$ 10,460$ 10,983$ 11,532$ 12,109$ 4203 Civic Design Manager 8,996$ 9,446$ 9,918$ 10,414$ 10,935$ 2122 Code Enforcement Supervisor 6,856$ 7,199$ 7,559$ 7,937$ 8,334$ 4204 Data & Infrastructure Manager 9,962$ 10,460$ 10,983$ 11,532$ 12,109$ 1105 Deputy City Attorney I 9,028$ 9,479$ 9,953$ 10,451$ 10,974$ 1109 Deputy City Attorney II 9,954$ 10,452$ 10,974$ 11,523$ 12,099$ 2120 Deputy Fire Marshall 8,479$ 8,903$ 9,348$ 9,816$ 10,307$ 2135 Deputy Public Works Director 9,739$ 10,226$ 10,737$ 11,274$ 11,838$ 7313 Economic Development Coordinator 8,181$ 8,590$ 9,020$ 9,471$ 9,944$ 2128 Economic Development Manager 8,996$ 9,446$ 9,918$ 10,414$ 10,935$ 7117 Emergency Services Manager 7,982$ 8,381$ 8,800$ 9,240$ 9,702$ 9005 Events Coordinator 6,952$ 7,300$ 7,665$ 8,048$ 8,450$ 2107 Human Resources Operations Manager 8,018$ 8,419$ 8,840$ 9,282$ 9,746$ 2208 Operations and Maintenance Manager 8,741$ 9,178$ 9,637$ 10,119$ 10,625$ 2703 Parking Services Manager 8,181$ 8,590$ 9,020$ 9,471$ 9,944$ 7312 Parks Superintendent 7,982$ 8,381$ 8,800$ 9,240$ 9,702$ 2116 Planning Manager 9,161$ 9,620$ 10,101$ 10,606$ 11,136$ 1202 Public Works Administrative Manager 8,181$ 8,590$ 9,019$ 9,470$ 9,944$ 8103 Recreation Supervisor 6,857$ 7,200$ 7,559$ 7,937$ 8,334$ 2206 Senior Civil Engineer (SRSD)9,481$ 9,955$ 10,452$ 10,975$ 11,524$ 7317 Senior Code Enforcement Supervisor 7,568$ 7,946$ 8,344$ 8,761$ 9,199$ 2105 Senior Management Analyst 7,795$ 8,185$ 8,594$ 9,024$ 9,475$ 2203 Senior Project Manager 8,212$ 8,623$ 9,054$ 9,506$ 9,982$ 8102 Senior Recreation Supervisor 7,568$ 7,946$ 8,344$ 8,761$ 9,199$ 7310 Sewer Maintenance Superintendent 7,982$ 8,381$ 8,800$ 9,240$ 9,702$ 7311 Street Maintenance Superintendent 7,982$ 8,381$ 8,800$ 9,240$ 9,702$ 2150 Sustainability Program Manager 6,570$ 6,898$ 7,243$ 7,605$ 7,986$ SAN RAFAEL UNREPRESENTED MID-MANAGEMENT SALARY SCHEDULE Effective July 1, 2020 Note: The Salary Schedule below reflects a 5% furlough reduction for FY 20/21 Grade Position A B C D E 7241 Accountant I 5,496$ 5,770$ 6,059$ 6,362$ 6,680$ 7240 Accountant II 5,771$ 6,059$ 6,362$ 6,680$ 7,014$ 7200 Accounting Assistant I 4,003$ 4,203$ 4,413$ 4,634$ 4,865$ 7201 Accounting Assistant II 4,409$ 4,629$ 4,861$ 5,104$ 5,359$ 7299 Accounting Technician 5,497$ 5,772$ 6,061$ 6,364$ 6,682$ 7205 Administrative Analyst 5,108$ 5,363$ 5,631$ 5,913$ 6,208$ 7211 Administrative Assistant I 4,149$ 4,356$ 4,574$ 4,803$ 5,043$ 7212 Administrative Assistant II 4,574$ 4,803$ 5,043$ 5,295$ 5,560$ 7295 Senior Administrative Assistant 4,926$ 5,172$ 5,431$ 5,702$ 5,987$ 7216 Administrative Assistant to the City Clerk 4,926$ 5,172$ 5,431$ 5,702$ 5,987$ 7210 Assistant Planner 5,777$ 6,066$ 6,369$ 6,687$ 7,022$ 7208 Associate Planner 6,375$ 6,694$ 7,029$ 7,380$ 7,749$ 7217 Building Inspector I 5,235$ 5,497$ 5,771$ 6,060$ 6,363$ 7218 Building Inspector II 5,777$ 6,066$ 6,369$ 6,687$ 7,022$ 7475 Building Technician I 4,514$ 4,740$ 4,977$ 5,226$ 5,487$ 7220 Business License Examiner 4,629$ 4,860$ 5,103$ 5,358$ 5,626$ 7222 Code Enforcement Official I 4,194$ 4,403$ 4,624$ 4,855$ 5,097$ 7223 Code Enforcement Official II 4,627$ 4,859$ 5,102$ 5,357$ 5,625$ 7380 Code Enforcement Official III 5,496$ 5,770$ 6,059$ 6,362$ 6,680$ 2119 Construction Inspector - SRSD 5,690$ 5,974$ 6,273$ 6,587$ 6,916$ 7224 Custodian 3,917$ 4,113$ 4,318$ 4,534$ 4,761$ 4210 Data Analyst I 5,901$ 6,196$ 6,506$ 6,831$ 7,173$ 4211 Data Analyst II 6,491$ 6,816$ 7,156$ 7,514$ 7,890$ 4212 Data Analyst III 7,140$ 7,497$ 7,872$ 8,266$ 8,679$ 7226 Deputy City Clerk 5,049$ 5,302$ 5,567$ 5,845$ 6,137$ 7120 Emergency Management Coordinator 4,744$ 4,981$ 5,230$ 5,492$ 5,766$ 7121 Environmental Management Coordinator 4,744$ 4,981$ 5,230$ 5,492$ 5,766$ 7232 Facility Repair Supervisor 6,236$ 6,548$ 6,875$ 7,219$ 7,580$ 7291 Facility Repair Worker I 4,425$ 4,646$ 4,879$ 5,122$ 5,379$ 7233 Facility Repair Worker II 4,880$ 5,124$ 5,380$ 5,649$ 5,932$ 7294 Facility Repair Worker III 5,252$ 5,515$ 5,790$ 6,080$ 6,384$ 7108 Fire Prevention Inspector I 6,615$ 6,946$ 7,293$ 7,657$ 8,040$ 7107 Fire Prevention Inspector II 7,292$ 7,657$ 8,040$ 8,442$ 8,864$ 7298 IT Help Desk Supervisor 6,491$ 6,816$ 7,157$ 7,514$ 7,890$ 7243 Librarian I 5,063$ 5,316$ 5,582$ 5,861$ 6,154$ 7244 Librarian II 5,318$ 5,584$ 5,863$ 6,156$ 6,464$ 2404 Library Aide 2,427$ 2,548$ 2,675$ 2,809$ 2,950$ 7246 Library Assistant I 3,333$ 3,500$ 3,675$ 3,859$ 4,052$ 7247 Library Assistant II 3,770$ 3,958$ 4,156$ 4,364$ 4,582$ 2405 Library Tech Services Supervisor 4,820$ 5,061$ 5,314$ 5,580$ 5,859$ 7292 Literacy Program Supervisor 5,867$ 6,161$ 6,469$ 6,792$ 7,132$ 7249 Mail and Stores Clerk 3,585$ 3,764$ 3,953$ 4,150$ 4,358$ 7255 Network Analyst 5,902$ 6,197$ 6,507$ 6,832$ 7,174$ City of San Rafael SEIU - SALARY SCHEDULE Effective July 1, 2020 Note: The Salary Schedule below reflects a 5% furlough reduction for FY 20/21 Grade Position A B C D E City of San Rafael SEIU - SALARY SCHEDULE Effective July 1, 2020 7274 Network Support Technician 4,514$ 4,740$ 4,977$ 5,226$ 5,487$ 7285 Office Assistant I 3,414$ 3,585$ 3,764$ 3,952$ 4,150$ 7284 Office Assistant II 3,857$ 4,050$ 4,252$ 4,465$ 4,688$ 7256 Park Equipment Mechanic 5,126$ 5,382$ 5,651$ 5,934$ 6,230$ 7257 Parking Attendant I 1,955$ 2,052$ 2,155$ 2,263$ 2,376$ 7275 Parking Attendant II 2,153$ 2,260$ 2,373$ 2,492$ 2,616$ 6208 Parking Enforcement Officer 4,768$ 5,007$ 5,257$ 5,520$ 5,796$ 6212 Parking Equipment Technician 4,536$ 4,763$ 5,001$ 5,251$ 5,513$ 6209 Parking Maintenance & Collections 4,536$ 4,763$ 5,001$ 5,251$ 5,513$ 6211 Parking Operations Supervisor 6,236$ 6,547$ 6,875$ 7,218$ 7,579$ 7258 Parks & Graffitti Worker 4,114$ 4,320$ 4,536$ 4,763$ 5,001$ 2123 Parks Lead Maintenance Worker 5,252$ 5,515$ 5,790$ 6,080$ 6,384$ 7271 Parks Maintenance Supervisor 6,236$ 6,548$ 6,875$ 7,219$ 7,580$ 7236 Parks Maintenance Worker I 4,320$ 4,536$ 4,763$ 5,001$ 5,251$ 7238 Parks Maintenance Worker II 4,536$ 4,763$ 5,001$ 5,251$ 5,514$ 7296 Permit Services Coordinator 6,236$ 6,548$ 6,875$ 7,219$ 7,580$ 7261 Planning Technician 4,514$ 4,740$ 4,977$ 5,226$ 5,487$ 9453 Principal Planner 8,345$ 8,762$ 9,200$ 9,660$ 10,143$ 7234 Printing Press Operator 4,464$ 4,687$ 4,922$ 5,168$ 5,426$ 1201 Program Coordinator 4,744$ 4,981$ 5,230$ 5,492$ 5,766$ 7290 Public Works Dispatcher 4,536$ 4,763$ 5,001$ 5,251$ 5,514$ 7263 Revenue Supervisor 7,012$ 7,362$ 7,730$ 8,117$ 8,523$ 2309 Senior Building Inspector 6,858$ 7,201$ 7,561$ 7,939$ 8,335$ 7219 Senior Building Technician 5,235$ 5,497$ 5,772$ 6,060$ 6,363$ 7265 Senior Library Assistant 3,959$ 4,157$ 4,365$ 4,583$ 4,812$ 7264 Senior Planner 7,214$ 7,575$ 7,954$ 8,352$ 8,769$ 2204 Sewer Lead Maintenance Worker 5,791$ 6,081$ 6,385$ 6,704$ 7,039$ 7266 Sewer Maintenance Worker I 4,648$ 4,880$ 5,124$ 5,381$ 5,650$ 7267 Sewer Maintenance Worker II 5,002$ 5,252$ 5,515$ 5,790$ 6,080$ 7281 Sewers Supervisor 6,547$ 6,874$ 7,218$ 7,579$ 7,957$ 7269 Shop & Equipment Supervisor 6,236$ 6,548$ 6,875$ 7,219$ 7,580$ 7280 Street Lead Maintenance Worker 5,252$ 5,515$ 5,790$ 6,080$ 6,384$ 7209 Street Maintenance Supervisor 6,236$ 6,548$ 6,875$ 7,219$ 7,580$ 7250 Street Maintenance Worker I 4,320$ 4,536$ 4,763$ 5,001$ 5,251$ 7251 Street Maintenance Worker II 4,536$ 4,763$ 5,001$ 5,251$ 5,514$ 7283 Street Sweeper Operator 4,763$ 5,001$ 5,251$ 5,514$ 5,789$ 7245 Supervising Librarian 5,867$ 6,161$ 6,469$ 6,792$ 7,132$ 8523 Supervising Parking Enforcement Officer 5,362$ 5,630$ 5,912$ 6,207$ 6,518$ 7288 Supervising Vehicle/Equipment Mechanic 5,516$ 5,792$ 6,082$ 6,386$ 6,705$ 7286 Vehicle/Equipment Mechanic I 4,648$ 4,881$ 5,125$ 5,381$ 5,650$ 7287 Vehicle/Equipment Mechanic II 5,126$ 5,382$ 5,651$ 5,934$ 6,230$ 2131 Volunteer Program Assistant 4,574$ 4,803$ 5,043$ 5,295$ 5,560$ Note: The Salary Schedule below reflects a 5% furlough reduction for FY 20/21 Grade Position A B C D E 7241 Accountant I 5,550$ 5,828$ 6,119$ 6,425$ 6,747$ 7240 Accountant II 5,829$ 6,120$ 6,426$ 6,747$ 7,085$ 7200 Accounting Assistant I 4,043$ 4,245$ 4,457$ 4,680$ 4,914$ 7201 Accounting Assistant II 4,453$ 4,676$ 4,909$ 5,155$ 5,413$ 7299 Accounting Technician 5,552$ 5,830$ 6,121$ 6,427$ 6,749$ 7205 Administrative Analyst 5,159$ 5,417$ 5,687$ 5,972$ 6,270$ 7211 Administrative Assistant I 4,190$ 4,400$ 4,620$ 4,851$ 5,093$ 7212 Administrative Assistant II 4,620$ 4,851$ 5,094$ 5,348$ 5,616$ 7295 Senior Administrative Assistant 4,975$ 5,224$ 5,485$ 5,759$ 6,047$ 7216 Administrative Assistant to the City Clerk 4,975$ 5,224$ 5,485$ 5,759$ 6,047$ 7210 Assistant Planner 5,835$ 6,126$ 6,433$ 6,754$ 7,092$ 7208 Associate Planner 6,439$ 6,761$ 7,099$ 7,454$ 7,827$ 7217 Building Inspector I 5,287$ 5,552$ 5,829$ 6,121$ 6,427$ 7218 Building Inspector II 5,835$ 6,126$ 6,433$ 6,754$ 7,092$ 7475 Building Technician I 4,560$ 4,788$ 5,027$ 5,278$ 5,542$ 7220 Business License Examiner 4,675$ 4,909$ 5,154$ 5,412$ 5,683$ 7222 Code Enforcement Official I 4,236$ 4,447$ 4,670$ 4,903$ 5,148$ 7223 Code Enforcement Official II 4,674$ 4,907$ 5,153$ 5,410$ 5,681$ 7380 Code Enforcement Official III 5,551$ 5,828$ 6,119$ 6,425$ 6,747$ 2119 Construction Inspector - SRSD 5,747$ 6,034$ 6,336$ 6,653$ 6,985$ 7224 Custodian 3,956$ 4,154$ 4,362$ 4,580$ 4,809$ 4210 Data Analyst I 5,960$ 6,258$ 6,571$ 6,899$ 7,244$ 4211 Data Analyst II 6,556$ 6,884$ 7,228$ 7,589$ 7,969$ 4212 Data Analyst III 7,212$ 7,572$ 7,951$ 8,348$ 8,766$ 7226 Deputy City Clerk 5,100$ 5,355$ 5,623$ 5,904$ 6,199$ 7120 Emergency Management Coordinator 4,791$ 5,031$ 5,283$ 5,547$ 5,824$ 7121 Environmental Management Coordinator 4,791$ 5,031$ 5,283$ 5,547$ 5,824$ 7232 Facility Repair Supervisor 6,298$ 6,613$ 6,944$ 7,291$ 7,655$ 7291 Facility Repair Worker I 4,469$ 4,693$ 4,927$ 5,174$ 5,432$ 7233 Facility Repair Worker II 4,929$ 5,175$ 5,434$ 5,706$ 5,991$ 7294 Facility Repair Worker III 5,305$ 5,570$ 5,848$ 6,141$ 6,448$ 7108 Fire Prevention Inspector I 6,681$ 7,015$ 7,366$ 7,734$ 8,121$ 7107 Fire Prevention Inspector II 7,365$ 7,733$ 8,120$ 8,526$ 8,952$ 7298 IT Help Desk Supervisor 6,556$ 6,884$ 7,228$ 7,589$ 7,969$ 7243 Librarian I 5,113$ 5,369$ 5,637$ 5,919$ 6,215$ 7244 Librarian II 5,371$ 5,640$ 5,922$ 6,218$ 6,529$ 2404 Library Aide 2,451$ 2,574$ 2,702$ 2,837$ 2,979$ 7246 Library Assistant I 3,367$ 3,535$ 3,712$ 3,897$ 4,092$ 7247 Library Assistant II 3,808$ 3,998$ 4,198$ 4,408$ 4,628$ 2405 Library Tech Services Supervisor 4,868$ 5,112$ 5,367$ 5,635$ 5,917$ 7292 Literacy Program Supervisor 5,926$ 6,222$ 6,533$ 6,860$ 7,203$ 7249 Mail and Stores Clerk 3,621$ 3,802$ 3,992$ 4,192$ 4,401$ 7255 Network Analyst 5,961$ 6,259$ 6,572$ 6,901$ 7,246$ City of San Rafael SEIU - SALARY SCHEDULE Effective January 1, 2021 Note: The Salary Schedule below reflects a 5% furlough reduction for FY 20/21 Grade Position A B C D E City of San Rafael SEIU - SALARY SCHEDULE Effective January 1, 2021 7274 Network Support Technician 4,560$ 4,788$ 5,027$ 5,278$ 5,542$ 7285 Office Assistant I 3,448$ 3,621$ 3,802$ 3,992$ 4,191$ 7284 Office Assistant II 3,895$ 4,090$ 4,295$ 4,509$ 4,735$ 7256 Park Equipment Mechanic 5,177$ 5,436$ 5,708$ 5,993$ 6,293$ 7257 Parking Attendant I 1,974$ 2,073$ 2,176$ 2,285$ 2,399$ 7275 Parking Attendant II 2,174$ 2,283$ 2,397$ 2,517$ 2,643$ 6208 Parking Enforcement Officer 4,816$ 5,057$ 5,309$ 5,575$ 5,854$ 6212 Parking Equipment Technician 4,581$ 4,810$ 5,051$ 5,303$ 5,569$ 6209 Parking Maintenance & Collections 4,581$ 4,810$ 5,051$ 5,303$ 5,569$ 6211 Parking Operations Supervisor 6,298$ 6,613$ 6,944$ 7,291$ 7,655$ 7258 Parks & Graffitti Worker 4,155$ 4,363$ 4,581$ 4,810$ 5,051$ 2123 Parks Lead Maintenance Worker 5,305$ 5,570$ 5,848$ 6,141$ 6,448$ 7271 Parks Maintenance Supervisor 6,298$ 6,613$ 6,944$ 7,291$ 7,655$ 7236 Parks Maintenance Worker I 4,363$ 4,582$ 4,811$ 5,051$ 5,304$ 7238 Parks Maintenance Worker II 4,581$ 4,811$ 5,051$ 5,304$ 5,569$ 7296 Permit Services Coordinator 6,298$ 6,613$ 6,944$ 7,291$ 7,655$ 7261 Planning Technician 4,560$ 4,788$ 5,027$ 5,278$ 5,542$ 9453 Principal Planner 8,428$ 8,850$ 9,292$ 9,757$ 10,245$ 7234 Printing Press Operator 4,509$ 4,734$ 4,971$ 5,220$ 5,481$ 1201 Program Coordinator 4,791$ 5,031$ 5,283$ 5,547$ 5,824$ 7290 Public Works Dispatcher 4,581$ 4,811$ 5,051$ 5,304$ 5,569$ 7263 Revenue Supervisor 7,082$ 7,436$ 7,808$ 8,198$ 8,608$ 2309 Senior Building Inspector 6,926$ 7,273$ 7,636$ 8,018$ 8,419$ 7219 Senior Building Technician 5,288$ 5,552$ 5,830$ 6,121$ 6,427$ 7265 Senior Library Assistant 3,998$ 4,198$ 4,408$ 4,629$ 4,860$ 7264 Senior Planner 7,287$ 7,651$ 8,033$ 8,435$ 8,857$ 2204 Sewer Lead Maintenance Worker 5,849$ 6,142$ 6,449$ 6,771$ 7,110$ 7266 Sewer Maintenance Worker I 4,694$ 4,929$ 5,176$ 5,434$ 5,706$ 7267 Sewer Maintenance Worker II 5,052$ 5,305$ 5,570$ 5,848$ 6,141$ 7281 Sewers Supervisor 6,612$ 6,943$ 7,290$ 7,654$ 8,037$ 7269 Shop & Equipment Supervisor 6,298$ 6,613$ 6,944$ 7,291$ 7,655$ 7280 Street Lead Maintenance Worker 5,305$ 5,570$ 5,848$ 6,141$ 6,448$ 7209 Street Maintenance Supervisor 6,298$ 6,613$ 6,944$ 7,291$ 7,655$ 7250 Street Maintenance Worker I 4,363$ 4,582$ 4,811$ 5,051$ 5,304$ 7251 Street Maintenance Worker II 4,581$ 4,811$ 5,051$ 5,304$ 5,569$ 7283 Street Sweeper Operator 4,811$ 5,051$ 5,304$ 5,569$ 5,847$ 7245 Supervising Librarian 5,926$ 6,222$ 6,533$ 6,860$ 7,203$ 8523 Supervising Parking Enforcement Officer 5,416$ 5,687$ 5,971$ 6,269$ 6,583$ 7288 Supervising Vehicle/Equipment Mechanic 5,571$ 5,850$ 6,143$ 6,450$ 6,772$ 7286 Vehicle/Equipment Mechanic I 4,695$ 4,929$ 5,176$ 5,435$ 5,706$ 7287 Vehicle/Equipment Mechanic II 5,177$ 5,436$ 5,708$ 5,993$ 6,293$ 2131 Volunteer Program Assistant 4,620$ 4,851$ 5,094$ 5,348$ 5,616$ NOTE: 2,920 annual hours for Safety employees; 2,080 annual hours for Fire MechanicGrade Code Title A B C D EAnnually 108,746$ 114,184$ 119,893$ 125,888$ 132,182$ Monthly 9,062$ 9,515$ 9,991$ 10,491$ 11,015$ Hourly 37.2419$ 39.1040$ 41.0592$ 43.1122$ 45.2678$ Annually 114,188$ 119,897$ 125,892$ 132,187$ 138,796$ Monthly 9,516$ 9,991$ 10,491$ 11,016$ 11,566$ Hourly 39.1054$ 41.0607$ 43.1137$ 45.2694$ 47.5329$ Annually 98,495$ 103,420$ 108,591$ 114,020$ 119,722$ Monthly 8,208$ 8,618$ 9,049$ 9,502$ 9,977$ Hourly 33.7312$ 35.4178$ 37.1887$ 39.0481$ 41.0005$ Annually 88,998$ 93,448$ 98,120$ 103,026$ 108,178$ Monthly 7,417$ 7,787$ 8,177$ 8,586$ 9,015$ Hourly 42.7876$ 44.9269$ 47.1733$ 49.5319$ 52.0085$ Annually 86,476$ 90,800$ 95,340$ 100,107$ 105,112$ Monthly 7,206$ 7,567$ 7,945$ 8,342$ 8,759$ Hourly 29.6151$ 31.0958$ 32.6506$ 34.2832$ 35.9973$ Annually 96,987$ 101,311$ 105,851$ 110,618$ 115,623$ Monthly 8,082$ 8,443$ 8,821$ 9,218$ 9,635$ Hourly 33.2148$ 34.6956$ 36.2504$ 37.8829$ 39.5970$ *Fire Captain assigned to Administrative Duty receives an additional 5% Premium pay and 5% Incentive payMonths 1-2 Months 3-6Months 7-12*Annually 77,828$ 82,152$ 86,476$ Monthly 6,486$ 6,846$ 7,206$ Hourly 26.6536$ 28.1343$ 29.6151$ SAN RAFAEL FIREFIGHTERS' ASSOCIATION BASE PAY SCHEDULE Effective July 1, 20207105 Fire Captain*1107 Fire Captain Specialist7106 Fire Engineer7109Fire Mechanic(40 hr/week)7110 Firefighter (without PM license)7126Firefighter-Paramedic(after probationary year, includes Paramedic Pay)**Entry Level Firefighter pay for probationary year:*After probationary year move into Firefighter-Paramedic grade code2126 Entry Level Firefighter NOTE: 2,920 annual hours for Safety employees; 2,080 annual hours for Fire MechanicGrade Code TitleABCDEAnnually 110,921$ 116,467$ 122,291$ 128,405$ 134,826$ Monthly 9,243$ 9,706$ 10,191$ 10,700$ 11,235$ Hourly 37.9868$ 39.8861$ 41.8804$ 43.9745$ 46.1732$ Annually 116,472$ 122,295$ 128,410$ 134,830$ 141,572$ Monthly 9,706$ 10,191$ 10,701$ 11,236$ 11,798$ Hourly 39.8875$ 41.8819$ 43.9760$ 46.1748$ 48.4835$ Annually 100,465$ 105,488$ 110,763$ 116,301$ 122,116$ Monthly 8,372$ 8,791$ 9,230$ 9,692$ 10,176$ Hourly 34.4059$ 36.1261$ 37.9325$ 39.8291$ 41.8205$ Annually 90,778$ 95,317$ 100,083$ 105,087$ 110,341$ Monthly 7,565$ 7,943$ 8,340$ 8,757$ 9,195$ Hourly 43.6433$ 45.8255$ 48.1167$ 50.5226$ 53.0487$ Annually 88,206$ 92,616$ 97,247$ 102,109$ 107,214$ Monthly 7,350$ 7,718$ 8,104$ 8,509$ 8,935$ Hourly 30.2074$ 31.7177$ 33.3036$ 34.9688$ 36.7173$ Annually 98,927$ 103,337$ 107,968$ 112,830$ 117,936$ Monthly 8,244$ 8,611$ 8,997$ 9,403$ 9,828$ Hourly 33.8791$ 35.3895$ 36.9754$ 38.6405$ 40.3890$ *Fire Captain assigned to Administrative Duty receives an additional 5% Premium pay and 5% Incentive payMonths 1-2 Months 3-6Months 7-12*Annually 79,385$ 83,795$ 88,206$ Monthly 6,615$ 6,983$ 7,350$ Hourly 27.1866$ 28.6970$ 30.2074$ SAN RAFAEL FIREFIGHTERS' ASSOCIATION BASE PAY SCHEDULE Effective January 1, 20217105 Fire Captain*1107 Fire Captain Specialist7106 Fire Engineer7109Fire Mechanic(40 hr/week)7110 Firefighter (without PM license)7126Firefighter-Paramedic(after probationary year, includes Paramedic Pay)**Entry Level Firefighter pay for probationary year:*After probationary year move into Firefighter-Paramedic grade code2126 Entry Level Firefighter Wage Classes Title A B C D7112 Battalion Chief 12,441$ 13,063$ 13,716$ 14,402$ *Employees in a specialty assignment shall receive five percent (5%) premium pay.SAN RAFAEL FIRE CHIEF OFFICERS' ASSOCIATIONSALARY SCHEDULEEffective July 1, 2020 Wage Classes Title A B C D7112 Battalion Chief 12,690$ 13,324$ 13,990$ 14,690$ *Employees in a specialty assignment shall receive five percent (5%) premium pay.SAN RAFAEL FIRE CHIEF OFFICERS' ASSOCIATIONSALARY SCHEDULEEffective January 1, 2021 Grade*Position Entry Level Step A1 ABCDE Annually 62,192$ 65,301$ 68,566$ 71,995$ 75,594$ 79,374$ Monthly 5,183$ 5,442$ 5,714$ 6,000$ 6,300$ 6,615$ Hourly 29.8999$ 31.3948$ 32.9646$ 34.6128$ 36.3435$ 38.1606$ Annually 83,318$ 87,484$ 91,858$ 96,451$ 101,274$ 106,337$ Monthly 6,943$ 7,290$ 7,655$ 8,038$ 8,439$ 8,861$ Hourly 40.0568$ 42.0597$ 44.1626$ 46.3708$ 48.6893$ 51.1238$ Annually 63,708$ 66,894$ 70,238$ 73,750$ 77,438$ 81,310$ Monthly 5,309$ 5,574$ 5,853$ 6,146$ 6,453$ 6,776$ Hourly 30.6290$ 32.1605$ 33.7685$ 35.4569$ 37.2297$ 39.0912$ Annually 29,075$ 30,529$ 32,056$ 33,658$ 35,341$ 37,108$ Monthly 2,423$ 2,544$ 2,671$ 2,805$ 2,945$ 3,092$ Hourly 13.9785$ 14.6775$ 15.4113$ 16.1819$ 16.9910$ 17.8405$ Annually 59,867$ 62,860$ 66,003$ 69,303$ 72,769$ 76,407$ Monthly 4,989$ 5,238$ 5,500$ 5,775$ 6,064$ 6,367$ Hourly 28.7821$ 30.2213$ 31.7323$ 33.3189$ 34.9849$ 36.7341$ Annually N/A 94,636$ 99,368$ 104,336$ 109,553$ 115,031$ Monthly N/A 7,886$ 8,281$ 8,695$ 9,129$ 9,586$ Hourly N/A 45.4981$ 47.7730$ 50.1617$ 52.6697$ 55.3032$ Annually 52,244$ 54,856$ 57,599$ 60,479$ 63,503$ 66,678$ Monthly 4,354$ 4,571$ 4,800$ 5,040$ 5,292$ 5,556$ Hourly 25.1172$ 26.3731$ 27.6917$ 29.0763$ 30.5301$ 32.0566$ Annually 65,315$ 68,580$ 72,010$ 75,610$ 79,390$ 83,360$ Monthly 5,443$ 5,715$ 6,001$ 6,301$ 6,616$ 6,947$ Hourly 31.4013$ 32.9714$ 34.6200$ 36.3510$ 38.1685$ 40.0769$ Annually N/A 73,725$ 77,411$ 81,281$ 85,345$ 89,613$ Monthly N/A 6,144$ 6,451$ 6,773$ 7,112$ 7,468$ Hourly N/A 35.4445$ 37.2167$ 39.0776$ 41.0314$ 43.0830$ Annually N/A N/A N/A 101,610$ 106,691$ 112,025$ Monthly N/A N/A N/A 8,468$ 8,891$ 9,335$ Hourly N/A N/A N/A 48.8511$ 51.2937$ 53.8583$ Annually 65,315$ 68,580$ 72,010$ 75,610$ 79,390$ 83,360$ Monthly 5,443$ 5,715$ 6,001$ 6,301$ 6,616$ 6,947$ Hourly 31.4013$ 32.9714$ 34.6200$ 36.3510$ 38.1685$ 40.0769$ Annually 83,604$ 87,784$ 92,173$ 96,782$ 101,621$ 106,702$ Monthly 6,967$ 7,315$ 7,681$ 8,065$ 8,468$ 8,892$ Hourly 40.1943$ 42.2040$ 44.3142$ 46.5299$ 48.8564$ 51.2992$ Annually 76,001$ 79,801$ 83,791$ 87,981$ 92,380$ 96,999$ Monthly 6,333$ 6,650$ 6,983$ 7,332$ 7,698$ 8,083$ Hourly 36.5389$ 38.3659$ 40.2842$ 42.2984$ 44.4133$ 46.6340$ Annually 65,315$ 68,580$ 72,010$ 75,610$ 79,390$ 83,360$ Monthly 5,443$ 5,715$ 6,001$ 6,301$ 6,616$ 6,947$ Hourly 31.4013$ 32.9714$ 34.6200$ 36.3510$ 38.1685$ 40.0769$ Annually 61,174$ 64,233$ 67,444$ 70,817$ 74,357$ 78,075$ Monthly 5,098$ 5,353$ 5,620$ 5,901$ 6,196$ 6,506$ Hourly 29.4106$ 30.8811$ 32.4251$ 34.0464$ 35.7487$ 37.5362$ Annually N/A N/A N/A 116,187$ 121,996$ 128,096$ Monthly N/A N/A N/A 9,682$ 10,166$ 10,675$ Hourly N/A N/A N/A 55.8592$ 58.6521$ 61.5848$ Annually 93,362$ 98,030$ 102,932$ 108,079$ 113,483$ 119,157$ Monthly 7,780$ 8,169$ 8,578$ 9,007$ 9,457$ 9,930$ Hourly 44.8858$ 47.1300$ 49.4865$ 51.9609$ 54.5589$ 57.2869$ *Entry Level Pay Grade is 1XXXX (e.g., Entry Level Police Officer grade code is 16107) 6111 POLICE REGULATORY OFFICER 4524 POLICE SECURITY OFFICER 6104 POLICE SERGEANT 6107 POLICE OFFICER 6109 POLICE RECRUIT 9525 YOUTH SERVICES PROGRAM SUPERVISOR 6215 POLICE LEAD COMMUNICATIONS DISPATCHER 6106 POLICE CORPORAL 6206 POLICE EVIDENCE & PROPERTY TECHNICIAN 6201 POLICE SUPPORT SERVICES SUPERVISOR 9622 POLICE COMMUNICATIONS DISPATCH TRAINEE 6205 POLICE COMMUNICATIONS DISPATCHER 6202 POLICE ADMINISTRATIVE TECHNICIAN 9420 POLICE CADET 2121 POLICE CALL TAKER & RECORDS SPECIALIST SAN RAFAEL POLICE ASSOCIATION SALARY SCHEDULE Effective July 1, 2020 6203 COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICER 6207 MENTAL HEALTH LIAISON Grade*Position Entry Level Step A1 ABCDE Annually 63,436$ 66,607$ 69,938$ 73,435$ 77,106$ 80,962$ Monthly 5,286$ 5,551$ 5,828$ 6,120$ 6,426$ 6,747$ Hourly 30.4979$ 32.0227$ 33.6239$ 35.3051$ 37.0703$ 38.9238$ Annually 84,985$ 89,234$ 93,695$ 98,380$ 103,299$ 108,464$ Monthly 7,082$ 7,436$ 7,808$ 8,198$ 8,608$ 9,039$ Hourly 40.8580$ 42.9008$ 45.0459$ 47.2982$ 49.6631$ 52.1462$ Annually 64,982$ 68,232$ 71,643$ 75,225$ 78,987$ 82,936$ Monthly 5,415$ 5,686$ 5,970$ 6,269$ 6,582$ 6,911$ Hourly 31.2416$ 32.8037$ 34.4438$ 36.1660$ 37.9743$ 39.8731$ Annually 29,657$ 31,140$ 32,697$ 34,332$ 36,048$ 37,850$ Monthly 2,471$ 2,595$ 2,725$ 2,861$ 3,004$ 3,154$ Hourly 14.2581$ 14.9710$ 15.7196$ 16.5055$ 17.3308$ 18.1973$ Annually 61,064$ 64,117$ 67,323$ 70,689$ 74,224$ 77,935$ Monthly 5,089$ 5,343$ 5,610$ 5,891$ 6,185$ 6,495$ Hourly 29.3578$ 30.8257$ 32.3670$ 33.9853$ 35.6846$ 37.4688$ Annually N/A 96,529$ 101,355$ 106,423$ 111,744$ 117,331$ Monthly N/A 8,044$ 8,446$ 8,869$ 9,312$ 9,778$ Hourly N/A 46.4081$ 48.7285$ 51.1649$ 53.7231$ 56.4093$ Annually 53,289$ 55,953$ 58,751$ 61,688$ 64,773$ 68,011$ Monthly 4,441$ 4,663$ 4,896$ 5,141$ 5,398$ 5,668$ Hourly 25.6196$ 26.9005$ 28.2456$ 29.6578$ 31.1407$ 32.6978$ Annually 66,621$ 69,952$ 73,450$ 77,122$ 80,978$ 85,027$ Monthly 5,552$ 5,829$ 6,121$ 6,427$ 6,748$ 7,086$ Hourly 32.0293$ 33.6308$ 35.3124$ 37.0780$ 38.9319$ 40.8785$ Annually N/A 75,199$ 78,959$ 82,907$ 87,052$ 91,405$ Monthly N/A 6,267$ 6,580$ 6,909$ 7,254$ 7,617$ Hourly N/A 36.1534$ 37.9611$ 39.8591$ 41.8521$ 43.9447$ Annually N/A N/A N/A 103,643$ 108,825$ 114,266$ Monthly N/A N/A N/A 8,637$ 9,069$ 9,522$ Hourly N/A N/A N/A 49.8281$ 52.3195$ 54.9355$ Annually 66,621$ 69,952$ 73,450$ 77,122$ 80,978$ 85,027$ Monthly 5,552$ 5,829$ 6,121$ 6,427$ 6,748$ 7,086$ Hourly 32.0293$ 33.6308$ 35.3124$ 37.0780$ 38.9319$ 40.8785$ Annually 85,276$ 89,540$ 94,017$ 98,718$ 103,654$ 108,836$ Monthly 7,106$ 7,462$ 7,835$ 8,226$ 8,638$ 9,070$ Hourly 40.9982$ 43.0481$ 45.2005$ 47.4605$ 49.8335$ 52.3252$ Annually 77,521$ 81,397$ 85,467$ 89,740$ 94,227$ 98,939$ Monthly 6,460$ 6,783$ 7,122$ 7,478$ 7,852$ 8,245$ Hourly 37.2697$ 39.1332$ 41.0899$ 43.1444$ 45.3016$ 47.5666$ Annually 66,621$ 69,952$ 73,450$ 77,122$ 80,978$ 85,027$ Monthly 5,552$ 5,829$ 6,121$ 6,427$ 6,748$ 7,086$ Hourly 32.0293$ 33.6308$ 35.3124$ 37.0780$ 38.9319$ 40.8785$ Annually 62,397$ 65,517$ 68,793$ 72,233$ 75,844$ 79,637$ Monthly 5,200$ 5,460$ 5,733$ 6,019$ 6,320$ 6,636$ Hourly 29.9988$ 31.4987$ 33.0736$ 34.7273$ 36.4637$ 38.2869$ Annually N/A N/A N/A 118,511$ 124,436$ 130,658$ Monthly N/A N/A N/A 9,876$ 10,370$ 10,888$ Hourly N/A N/A N/A 56.9764$ 59.8252$ 62.8165$ Annually 95,230$ 99,991$ 104,991$ 110,240$ 115,752$ 121,540$ Monthly 7,936$ 8,333$ 8,749$ 9,187$ 9,646$ 10,128$ Hourly 45.7835$ 48.0726$ 50.4763$ 53.0001$ 55.6501$ 58.4326$ *Entry Level Pay Grade is 1XXXX (e.g., Entry Level Police Officer grade code is 16107) 4524 POLICE SECURITY OFFICER 6104 POLICE SERGEANT 9525 YOUTH SERVICES PROGRAM SUPERVISOR 6107 POLICE OFFICER 6109 POLICE RECRUIT 6111 POLICE REGULATORY OFFICER 6215 POLICE LEAD COMMUNICATIONS DISPATCHER 6106 POLICE CORPORAL 6206 POLICE EVIDENCE & PROPERTY TECHNICIAN 6201 POLICE SUPPORT SERVICES SUPERVISOR 9622 POLICE COMMUNICATIONS DISPATCH TRAINEE 6205 POLICE COMMUNICATIONS DISPATCHER 6202 POLICE ADMINISTRATIVE TECHNICIAN 9420 POLICE CADET 2121 POLICE CALL TAKER & RECORDS SPECIALIST SAN RAFAEL POLICE ASSOCIATION SALARY SCHEDULE Effective January 1, 2021 6203 COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICER 6207 MENTAL HEALTH LIAISON GradePositionABCDE6103POLICE CAPTAIN (Benchmark)$12,070 $12,673 $13,307 $13,972 $14,6716110POLICE LIEUTENANT$10,686 $11,220 $11,781 $12,371 $12,989SAN RAFAEL POLICE MID-MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATIONSALARY SCHEDULEEffective July 1, 2020 GradePositionABCDE6103POLICE CAPTAIN (Benchmark)$12,311 $12,927 $13,573 $14,252 $14,9646110POLICE LIEUTENANT$10,900 $11,445 $12,017 $12,618 $13,249SAN RAFAEL POLICE MID-MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATIONSALARY SCHEDULEEffective January 1, 2021 Note: The Salary Schedule below reflects a 3% furlough reduction for FY 20/21 Grade Position A B C D E 7227 Assistant Civil Engineer 7,250$ 7,612$ 7,993$ 8,392$ 8,812$ 7229 Associate Civil Engineer 8,003$ 8,403$ 8,823$ 9,264$ 9,727$ 7277 Engineering Technician I 5,138$ 5,395$ 5,665$ 5,948$ 6,245$ 7230 Engineering Technician II 5,806$ 6,097$ 6,401$ 6,721$ 7,057$ 7330 Junior Engineer 5,806$ 6,097$ 6,401$ 6,721$ 7,057$ 7228 Senior Associate Engineer 7,617$ 7,997$ 8,397$ 8,817$ 9,258$ 2311 Senior Civil Engineer (PW)9,267$ 9,731$ 10,217$ 10,728$ 11,265$ 7331 Traffic Engineer 8,003$ 8,403$ 8,823$ 9,264$ 9,727$ 4793 Traffic Technician I 5,138$ 5,395$ 5,665$ 5,948$ 6,245$ 4792 Traffic Technician II 5,806$ 6,097$ 6,401$ 6,721$ 7,057$ WCE - San Rafael Salary Schedule Effective July 1, 2020 Cover Page Attachment 3. – Shared Services with other Governmental Agencies CITY OF SAN RAFAEL EXAMPLES OF SHARED SERVICES AND PARTNERSHIPS WITH OTHER GOVERNMENTAL AGENCIES AS OF JUNE 2020 LIBRARY: • Member of MARINet, a countywide consortium of public libraries and Dominican University. We co-fund and share a library catalog, dozens of online resources (collections of magazines, newspapers, ebooks), and engage in cooperative training sessions. • Northgate Mall Library - library services at the Northgate Mall are provided in collaboration with Marin County Free Library which provides collection materials and internet connectivity while San Rafael provides daily staffing. • San Rafael City Schools - San Rafael Library provides bulk library card distribution to students and MiFi hotspots to support distance learning based on data exchange under existing MOUs with the school board. • Miller Creek School District - San Rafael Library provides bulk library card distribution to students based on data exchange under existing MOUs with school board. • Part of NorthNet, a California regional consortium of public libraries. This consortium provides a book delivery service between libraries, and shared online resource purchases. • Part of Califa, a California statewide consortium of public libraries. This consortium provides discounted resource purchases and training opportunities. POLICE: • CSI (Crime Scene Investigation) - we are sharing training and assistance as needed with Fairfax PD. • Crisis Response Unit (CRU) - Formed a regional SWAT (Special Weapons and Tactics) and CNT (Crisis Negotiations Team) with Novato PD. The CRU is comprised of sworn and professional staff trained in tactics and negotiations and are ready to respond to any situation in San Rafael and Novato. These teams also share training and assistance as needed to other cities in the county. • Gang Enforcement - we are sharing officers/detectives with Novato PD, Central Marin Police Authority, and the MCSO for gang enforcement. • Gang Validations for Court Cases - we provide members of our SCU (Street Crimes Unit) to complete the required paperwork and process when a gang member is being tried in Marin County. • Marine Patrol - we provide assistance and respond to calls for service for the MCSO and Sausalito PD, as well as for the U.S. Coast Guard • Firearms & Active Shooter Training - we provide the trainers for smaller departments in Marin County like Tiburon PD, Fairfax PD, College of Marin PD, etc. • Police CLETS co-operative for accessing State DOJ data through the San Rafael network; our agency partners on this are Fairfax, Ross, College of Marin, and the District Attorney's Office. • Public Safety Answering Point (PSAP) - SRPD is the back-up PSAP for Fairfax PD. Fairfax PD provides police dispatch for Ross PD and College of Marin. • SRPD conducts Spanish certifications for Fairfax PD. Mill Valley PD recently reached out to us and would like us to do the same for their department. FIRE: • Marin County Sheriff’s Office Communications Center provides Fire/EMS dispatch services for San Rafael Fire as well as all other Marin fire agencies with the exception of Marin County Fire Department and the smaller coastal volunteer departments. • CSA 19 - Provide Fire/Rescue/Paramedic services to seven separate County areas within San Rafael through an agreement with the County of Marin that is supported by revenue to staff one fire station. • CSA 13 (Upper Lucas Valley) - Provide Paramedic services through an agreement with the County of Marin that is partially supported by a Paramedic Tax. • Marinwood CSD - Provide Paramedic services through an agreement with Marinwood CSD that is partially supported by a Paramedic Tax. • Marinwood CSD - Provide Fire and Rescue response and emergency operational oversight to Marinwood through a no cost agreement in exchange for response by Marinwood CSD Fire to a small portion of San Rafael that is adjacent to the Marinwood Fire Station and areas east of Highway 101 in the Smith Ranch area. This has been updated and is now part of the agreement for San Rafael to provide chief officer services to the CSD. • Shared Service Agreement between San Rafael and Marinwood provides for staffing of personnel to fill temporary vacancies on a voluntary basis. • Marin County CERT. Assist with regional deployment of disaster preparedness training. • Get Ready Marin. Assist with regional deployment of disaster preparedness training. • Central Marin Training Consortium. This is an agreement between San Rafael, Marinwood, Central Marin, and Kentfield fire agencies for the purposes of regional training in order to increase coordination and standardization. • Member of the Marin Wildfire Prevention Authority (MWPA) which is a JPA established by Measure C to support coordinated wildfire preparedness and mitigation. • Marin OES. Contractual agreement for certain services including emergency notification. • Marin Household Hazardous Waste JPA. Provide administrative services and oversee program deployment. • Marin Hazardous Materials Response Team. JPA. Provide administrative oversight. • San Rafael Fire Mechanic services for Marinwood. • San Rafael Fire Mechanic services for Central Marin Fire (agreement pending). • Member of Marin Emergency Radio Authority (MERA). PUBLIC WORKS: • Garage Services - vehicle maintenance for Town of San Anselmo, Fairfax, Ross Valley School District, and Marinwood Fire as needed. • Contract with Marin County DPW for Real Estate and Right of Way Acquisition related to State and Federal Projects. • Shared our staff and equipment with smaller cities such as San Anselmo and Ross for emergency responses to flooding and clean up upon request. • Share staff and equipment with San Rafael Sanitary District upon request by either group. • Coordinate roadway maintenance with County (i.e. Pt. San Pedro Road). • Participate in Marin County’s USAR, California Regional task Force 1. • Member of MCSTOPP. • Interact with FEMA regarding the 2017 storm events. • Participate in the Marin Public Works Association. ENVIRONMENTAL/SUSTAINABILITY: • Marin Sanitary Service Franchisor's Group: San Rafael, Larkspur, Ross, County of Marin, Las Gallinas Valley Sanitary District. • Marin Climate and Energy Partnership (MCEP: 11 cities, the County, and Marin’s public utilities) conducting GHG inventories, Climate Action Plan implementation and updates • Marin Sea Level Rise partnership (led by County of Marin, includes all Marin jurisdictions) conducting vulnerability assessments. • Ad hoc pilot programs with Transportation Authority of Marin (TAM), Marin Municipal Water District (MMWD), Marin School of Environmental Leadership (MSEL), and others such as a residential water conservation pilot, zero waste pilots, and transportation demand program pilots. COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT • Community Development is exploring opportunities to partner with other jurisdictions in land use streamlining efforts through creation of standardized forms and applications, retooling administrative review procedures and other similar partnership opportunities. • The City is partnering with the County of Marin and other Marin cities/towns on an update to the affordable housing in-lieu/commercial linkage fee that is charged to new development projects. The updated fee will be commonly applied throughout the Marin County jurisdictions, which will provide consistency and continuity in its application. RECREATION: • Provide management of Hamilton pool in Novato. • Provide school age childcare in San Rafael city schools district and Miller Creek school district facilities. • Shared services with Miller Creek school district to operate and manage the Terra Linda Community Garden on School District property. • Shared services with Terrapin Crossroads for development and maintenance of Beach Park. • Shared services with Marin Bocce to provide bocce to the community. • The Ranch shares space for use of Albert Park Stadium to provide Co-Ed Softball and Men’s D League softball. • Tax Aid services are offered at the Albert J. Boro Community Center and San Rafael Community Center. • Catholic Charities offers Kids Club Summer and School Year Program through the Albert Boro Community Center. • Jr. Giants Baseball Program. • Vision Impaired of Marin Spanish Support Group. • ESL Classes (Canal Alliance & Tamalpais UHSD/Bahia Vista Elementary School). • Aprendiendo Juntos (Parent Services Project). • Boy Scouts Troop 2000 provides service projects to support facility improvements at the Pickleweed Park and Boro Community Center. • Ball for All Basketball Camp. • Voces del Canal - Mini Soccer League. • Canal Youth & Family Council - Monthly canal arts and holiday events at the Boro Community Center. • Multicultural Center of Marin, Catholic Charities and individuals - Day of the Dead Celebration. • Drawbridge Weekly Expressive Art Group. • Point Blue Conservation Sciences - STRAW Program/Restoration. STRAW is a partnership where Point Blue works with elementary and middle school kids about environmental sciences and performs wetland restoration on the edge of Pickleweed Park. • Goldenaires, Whistlestop, Marin County Division of Aging and Adult Services offer older adult programming at the Terra Linda Community Center, the San Rafael Community Center, and the Albert J. Boro Community Center Multi-Cultural Older Adult Program. • Shared services with Marin Open Studios to provide exhibits at Falkirk Cultural Center as well as sculpture pieces at San Rafael sites. • Marin Master Gardeners works with San Rafael to maintain gardeners at Falkirk Cultural Center and to offer workshops for the community on gardening. • Pickleweed Preschool has been partnering with the Marin County Office of Education for the last four years—receiving continuous professional development, on-site coaching, and classroom assessments (CLASS) that provide valuable program feedback. • P-3 Initiative supported by MCOE with neighboring preschools and elementary schools with goals of developing community and aligning our grade levels/classrooms to where we are all practicing and incorporating similar strategies, teaching philosophies, and all learning from each other. Last year, the teachers attended a training led by First School. This project aims at improving the classroom experiences of low-income and minority children PreK-3rd grade by implementing curriculum that is aligned, inclusive, and developmentally appropriate. • Childcare partners with the YES program at Miller Creek Middle School. This is a program for 8th graders at Miller Creek who do 20 hours of community service at both Lucas Valley and Mary Silveira childcare sites. Students assist the children with their homework and play games. HOMELESSNESS: • Community Homeless Fund - fund administered through Marin County Council of Mayors and Councilmembers (all cities and towns contribute). • Marin Mobile Care - mobile homeless service program in partnership with other jurisdictions. • Homeless Policy Steering Committee - HUD-mandated committee responsible for allocating federal funding in Marin (Led by County of Marin). • Opening Doors Marin - public private partnership working to align affordable housing dollars across various countywide projects. • Coordinated Entry Steering Committee - Partnership with local service providers and the County of Marin to provide housing for the most vulnerable people in the community. MISCELLANEOUS: • Significant coordination and partnership with the County of Marin and every city/town in COVID-19 response such as MCCMC committee, Marin Recovers, Emergency Operations Center coordination, Marin Managers’ Association. • Co-location of Emergency Operation Center with County of Marin for PG&E Power Shut-offs • Parking Services provides meter collection and maintenance for the San Anselmo. • Human Resources is a member of the Sonoma-Marin Training Consortium. • Digital Services is part of MIDAS - inter-agency network links and other joint communication/computer projects. • AV system in our Council Chambers - We provide AV support and assistance to several agencies for any public meeting held in the Council Chambers, with specialized services provided by Community Media Center of Marin (part of the MTA JPA) and/or Corporate Media Systems (contract vendor). • Member of all County-wide JPA’s including MERA, Solid Waste. MGSA, etc. • Participate in MCCMC Subcommittees such as the Ad Hoc Pension and OPEB Committee. Cover Page Attachment 4. – Capital Improvement Program: FY 2020-21 through 2022-23 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM FY20/21 - 22/23 SAN RAFAEL THE CITY WITH A MISSION   2 | Page                 Capital Improvement Program FY 20/21 ‐ 22/23        This page intentionally left blank.      Capital Improvement Program FY 20/21 ‐ 22/23       3 | Page    Capital Improvement Program   FY 20/21 ‐ 22/23              City Council  Gary O. Phillips, Mayor  Kate Colin, Vice Mayor  Maribeth Bushey, Councilmember  Andrew Cuyugan McCullough, Councilmember  John Gamblin, Councilmember           SAN RAFAEL THE CITY WITH A MISSION   4 | Page                 Capital Improvement Program FY 20/21 ‐ 22/23     Table of Contents    Section I. Overview ........................................................................................................................................ 5  Background ......................................................................................................................................................... 5  CIP Process and Project Selection ....................................................................................................................... 5  Section II. Project Funding ............................................................................................................................. 8  Fund Types .......................................................................................................................................................... 8  Fiscal Year 20/21 Funding and Revenue Reductions .......................................................................................... 9  Section III. FY 19/20 Completed Projects ...................................................................................................... 15  Section IV: Upcoming Projects; Project Description and Budget Details ........................................................ 18   Section V: Rating Categories and Project Ratings ......................................................................................... 48  Section VI: Project Funding Tables ............................................................................................................... 53  Section VII: Project Locations ....................................................................................................................... 57                 Capital Improvement Program FY 20/21 ‐ 22/23       5 | Page  Section I. Overview  Background  Marin County’s oldest City, San Rafael lies between San Francisco and California’s famous wine  country. The City is in central Marin County and, while serving as the County seat, is the economic,  financial, cultural, and service center of the region. With a history dating back almost 150 years, the  public infrastructure includes miles of streets and sidewalks, numerous public buildings, acres of  medians and open space, and many other assets.   The City has a tradition of prudent financial management, including maintaining public assets in good  condition to minimize lifecycle costs. Residents and business owners greatly value the beauty of the  community’s built and natural environment and have high expectations regarding the upkeep of  public facilities. These factors have led the City to engage in active planning of capital improvements.     The City of San Rafael’s Capital Improvement Program (CIP) is a comprehensive, multi‐year planning  tool used to guide the City’s decision‐making process for construction, repair, and replacement of City  assets such as roadways, storm drain systems, parks, City buildings, and public safety facilities.  The  CIP document summarizes projects, including their funding sources, and prioritizes projects after  analysis and coordination with other City departments to ensure a comprehensive and equitable  approach is achieved. In the City of San Rafael, a new CIP budget is developed every year outlining  proposed improvements for the next three years. When the City’s annual budget is adopted, the CIP  for that year is also adopted.   The CIP seeks to balance the need to repair and replace existing assets and to deliver new assets  where they are most needed taking into account available resources. Beginning this fiscal year, the  CIP reflects a new process to identify and prioritize community values and core principles of Together  San Rafael. The City’s previous CIP prioritization process established several years ago focused on  infrastructural conditions, regulatory mandates, and project readiness. In contrast, the updated CIP  development process utilized this year incorporated other factors such as equity, whether or not  projects already have community support, and public health.   Incorporated in 1874, San Rafael has an aging infrastructure and backlog of deferred maintenance of  City‐owned facilities and assets. With the development of the CIP each year, more projects are  identified and requested than available resources can accomplish. To this end, staff developed a  model to prioritize and select projects to move forward for consideration.  CIP Process and Project Selection   Projects identified in the CIP are primarily driven by staff evaluation or engineering studies and/or  reports such as the 2018 Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan (BPMP). City staff also receive input from  community members, the City Council, Department Directors, and commissions such as the Parks and  Recreation Commission.      6 | Page                 Capital Improvement Program FY 20/21 ‐ 22/23     Project selection and priority is based on recommendations by a Rating Committee consisting of key  staff from various City departments. When rating projects, the Committee considers  health/safety/liability, priority initiatives, time sensitivity of funds involved, and the ability of a  project to maintain or enhance functionality. These four criteria, which are weighted factors shown as  percentages, are further defined as follows:   1. Health/Safety/Liability (35%) – Projects that are critical to public health and safety or  significantly reduce the City’s risk of liability will receive a higher rating.     2. Priority Initiatives (20%) – This category assigns priority to projects based on the City’s goals,  including the guiding principles of Together San Rafael, the General Plan, City  Council/community supported projects, and that advance equity in the community.     3. Time Sensitive Funds (25%) – CIP projects funded by state or federal grants often have funding  deadlines or project milestones. As such, grant‐funded projects will be rated higher to  accommodate timely‐use‐of‐fund requirements from the granting agency.     4. Maintain/Enhance Functionality (20%) – This category rates projects according to the  importance and urgency of the proposed repair, rehabilitation, or replacement. Proposed  maintenance than can be deferred will be rated lower than a pressing maintenance item  associated with a critical City asset.     Once the Rating Committee has prioritized projects, staff reviews available funding and allocates an  order‐of‐magnitude budget for the highest ranked projects from each category. New this year, staff  recommends retaining a contingency budget in each category as opposed to allocating all available  funding to projects. This will ensure that should unanticipated needs surface mid‐year, staff have  available funds to address this without impacting planned projects. Should contingency funds remain  at the end of the fiscal year, they will be allocated to a project during the next fiscal year.   Section V of this document provides a table of the rating criteria above as well as a summary of the  final ratings based on the Rating Committee’s ranking. The following flowchart outlines the process  staff follow during the development of the CIP.    Capital Improvement Program FY 20/21 ‐ 22/23       7 | Page     •List includes rollover projects from  the prior year CIP and new projects  as proposed by City Department  Directors and community members. Develop CIP  List •A Rating Committee consisting of  key staff from various City  departments ranks projects. Prioritize CIP  List •Staff examines the projects and  provides an order‐of‐magnitude  estimate of project costs. Project  Estimates •Staff from various City departments  examines the available budget for each  fund type. Budget  Analysis •Staff review existing workload to  determine the best approach to  delivering high priority projects. Staffing  Allocation •Staff develop the Draft CIP  Document for review by the  Rating Committee, Department  Directors, and the City Manager. Draft CIP  Document •The recommended CIP Document is  brought to City Council for review  and subsequent inclusion into next  fiscal year's budget. Recommended  CIP Document   8 | Page                 Capital Improvement Program FY 20/21 ‐ 22/23     Section II. Project Funding  Fund Types  Capital Improvement Program projects are paid for through a variety of different funds. Each fund  type has its own source of revenue as well as restrictions governing its use. The table below  summarizes the primary funding sources.     Fund # Fund Name Description  205  Stormwater  Fund    Established to fund stormwater maintenance, programs, and  improvements throughout the City. Fund #205 receives annual  revenues from the City’s Stormwater Activity fee (Municipal Code  Chapter 9.40).  206  Gas Tax;  Measure AA;  Senate Bill 1  Funds  The Gas Tax is revenue collected and subsequently distributed by  the State of California based on a percentage tax on each gallon of  gas purchased in San Rafael. Gas Tax may be used for capital  projects or maintenance on local streets, roads, traffic, and  bicycle/pedestrian facilities. Additionally, local sales tax, passed by  voters in 2018 as Measure AA, contributes to a portion of this fund  for roadway improvement projects.   208  Childcare Fund Projects identified in the CIP as utilizing Childcare Funds are  restricted to facility improvements at the City’s childcare centers.  235  Baypoint  Lagoon  Assessment  District  The Baypoint Lagoons Lighting and Landscape District was formed to  protect and enhance wildlife habitat and water quality in Baypoint  (Spinnaker) Lagoon and the adjacent diked salt marsh.  236  Loch Lomond  Assessment  District  The Loch Lomond (Melo‐Roos) Assessment District was established  in 1992 to pay for the repair and maintenance of the stormwater  system infrastructure in the District.  240  Parkland  Dedication  This fund was established to account for long‐term developer  deposits used to acquire and increase capacity of the City’s park  infrastructure.  241  Measure A  Measure A is a nine‐year ¼ percent transactions and use tax  managed by the County of Marin. The tax is restricted to care for  parks and open spaces. The Department of Library and Recreation,  in consultation with the Parks and Recreation Commission, provides  input each year as to which parks projects should be prioritized to  receive Measure A funding.  246  Traffic  Mitigation Fee    Traffic Mitigation Fees are an impact fee charged to a developer in  connection with the approval of a private land development project  with the purpose of offsetting or subsidizing public improvements  made necessary by the private development. The City utilizes Traffic    Capital Improvement Program FY 20/21 ‐ 22/23       9 | Page  Mitigation Fees for circulation‐related projects identified in the  General Plan.  420  Measure E Measure E was passed by San Rafael voters in November 2013  extending an existing 0.5% sales tax for 20 years and adding 0.25%  (25 cents on a $100 purchase). In February 2014, the City Council  directed staff to set aside the revenues from the added quarter  percent to fund public safety facilities improvements.   501  Parking  Services  Projects identified in the CIP as utilizing Parking Services Funds are  restricted to parking‐related projects, including maintenance and  upgrades at City parking garages and parking lots.  603  Building  Maintenance    The Building Maintenance Fund supports routine maintenance and  capital projects associated with the City’s buildings, parks and other  facilities. The Building Maintenance Fund is an internal revenue  fund, which means General Fund monies are the sole source of  revenue.    Grants  (various)  The City actively seeks grant funding for capital projects and  programs. Grant funding is available from regional, state, and  federal agencies for safety, transportation, emergency response,  and other types of projects.     Fiscal Year 20/21 Funding and Revenue Reductions  While several CIP projects are grant‐funded, most are not and are paid for through Funds 205  (Stormwater), 206 (Gas Tax), 246 (Traffic Mitigation), and 603 (Building Maintenance). Within each  fund type is an Operating Budget which consists of expenses related to maintenance of  infrastructure, equipment purchasing, miscellaneous contractual services, Annual Programs, and  other non‐project related work. Additionally, after deducting the Operating Budget from the total  available funding in each fund type, staff allocated a 15‐percent contingency of the remaining funds  to provide a buffer for unanticipated expenses which may arise mid‐year.  The public health state of emergency due to the COVID‐19 pandemic has created severe financial  burdens for the City, its residents and businesses. Inevitably, this economic downturn is resulting in a  dramatic reduction of the City’s revenues, impacting CIP funding revenues in Funds 206 (Gas Tax),  208 (Childcare), 241 (Measure A‐Parks), and 501 (Parking Services). The proposed projects in this  year’s CIP represent those projects staff can deliver based on revenue assumptions at this time,  including known projected reductions. Staff plan to track revenues throughout the fiscal year to  determine if additional reductions in project budgets are necessary.        10 | Page                 Capital Improvement Program FY 20/21 ‐ 22/23     Assumptions or comments for each of these funds’ reductions includes:  Fund # and Type Assumptions Comments  206 (Gas Tax)  FY 20/21 – 30% Reduction  FY 21/22 – 15% Reduction  FY 22/23 – 0% Reduction  Reduced  revenues  have  already  been  considered when determining which projects  to pursue in the CIP.  208 (Childcare)    Unclear  at  this  time  what  funding  decrease  there  may  be.  Previously‐started  design  contracts  are  being  suspended  until  further  notice.  241 (Measure A‐Parks)  FY 20/21 – 25% Reduction   501 (Parking Services)    Unclear  at  this  time  what  funding  decrease  there  may  be.  Previously‐planned  design  contracts for FY 20/21 have been postponed.  No planned projects to pursue in FY 20/21.     The following is a breakdown of these specific fund types for Fiscal Year 20/21 to illustrate how these  funds are typically utilized.        Capital Improvement Program FY 20/21 ‐ 22/23       11 | Page  Fund 205: Stormwater Fund  Fund 205 Total Available  $840,000  Operating Budget  $623,000  CIP Projects  $185,000  CIP 15% Contingency  $32,000                Total Available Funds  The 205 Stormwater Fund receives approximately $840,000 in annual revenues from the City’s  Stormwater Activity fee.    Operating Budget  The Operating Budget for Fund 205 covers expenses incurred for the maintenance of the City’s  drainage system and primarily its stormwater pump stations. Expenses include pump and motor  replacement at various stations, generator rentals, utilities, etc.     CIP Projects and Contingency  The 205 Stormwater Fund pays for CIP projects that involve the improvement of the City’s drainage  infrastructure including storm drain pipes, drainage basins, levees, and pump stations. Fifteen  percent of the non‐operating budget funding is reserved to account for any small, unanticipated  expenses not identified in the CIP document.        12 | Page                 Capital Improvement Program FY 20/21 ‐ 22/23     Fund 206: Gas Tax    Fund 206 Total Available  $8,530,000 Operating Budget  $3,710,000 CIP Projects  $2,640,000 CIP 15% Contingency  $460,000 RMRA  $1,720,000       Total Available Funds  The 206 Gas Tax Fund receives annual revenues from a variety of sources, including the State Gas Tax,  the City’s Refuse Regulatory Fee, Construction Impact Fee, Senate Bill 1: Road Maintenance and  Rehabilitation Account (RMRA), and local gas tax funds through voter‐approved initiatives such as  Measures A and AA.     As a result of the anticipated loss of revenue stemming from the COVID‐19 pandemic, staff estimate a  30% reduction in available Gas Tax Measure A, AA, and RMRA revenues for Fiscal Year 20/21. The  $8,040,000 shown in the table above reflects this 30% reduction and includes a $2.3 million fund  balance carried over from Fiscal Year 19/20.     Operating Budget  The Operating Budget for Fund 206 covers the costs of the City’s CIP Annual Programs including  Bridge Maintenance, MCSTOPP Implementation, Replacement of CMP Storm Drains, and Sidewalk  Repair Program. Additionally, funds are also earmarked for the maintenance of local streets, traffic  signals, miscellaneous contractual services, and partially cover the salaries of street maintenance  staff.     CIP Projects and 15% Contingency  Eligible CIP projects for the 206 Gas Tax Fund include a variety of projects within the public right‐of‐ way such as street resurfacing/restriping, curb ramp installation, pedestrian and bicycle  improvements, bridge repair, storm drain improvements, etc. Fifteen percent of the non‐operating  budget funding is reserved to account for any small, unanticipated expenses not identified in the CIP  document.    Senate Bill 1: Road Maintenance and Rehabilitation Account (RMRA)  Senate Bill 1 generates additional revenues that become part of the 206 Gas Tax Fund. These  restricted funds are reserved for specific projects, and their use is audited at the end of every fiscal  year. Project eligibility is the same as other 206 projects.       Capital Improvement Program FY 20/21 ‐ 22/23       13 | Page  Fund 246: Traffic Mitigation    Fund 246 Total Available  $1,800,000 Operating Budget  $400,000 CIP Projects  $1,200,000 CIP 15% Contingency  $200,000               Total Available Funds  The 246 Traffic Mitigation Fund receives revenues from the Traffic Mitigation Fee charged to  developers in connection with the approval of a private land development project. Designed as an  impact fee, revenues aim to offset additional vehicular trips associated with a development by  providing funding for high priority circulation improvements throughout the City identified in the  General Plan. Since the fee is dependent on approved development, annual revenues vary widely  from year to year and future revenues are largely unpredictable during the development of the CIP  each spring. Staff has estimated that $600,000 in annual revenues are anticipated in the upcoming  three‐year period.    Operating Budget  The Operating Budget for Fund 246 covers the cost of implementing the Bicycle Pedestrian Master  Plan, Citywide Crosswalk Improvements, and miscellaneous contractual costs associated with  citywide signalization improvements.    CIP Projects and 15% Contingency  Eligible projects for 246 funds are those specifically identified as circulation improvements in Exhibit  21A of the 2020 General Plan, etc. Fifteen percent of the non‐operating budget funding is reserved to  account for any small, unanticipated expenses not identified in the CIP document.         14 | Page                 Capital Improvement Program FY 20/21 ‐ 22/23     Fund 603: Building Maintenance                  Total Available Funds  The 603 Building Maintenance Fund is an internal revenue fund supported by the City’s General Fund.  The budget for this fund is set at $500,000 annually.     Operating Budget  The Operating Budget for Fund 603 covers the costs of various upkeep projects completed by the  Building Maintenance staff. Smaller scale maintenance such as replacement of failed lighting fixtures,  repairs to HVAC systems, and replacement of worn carpet are examples of operating budget  expenses.     CIP Projects and 15% Contingency  The 603 Buildling Maintenance Fund pays for improvement projects to City‐owned property,  including the community centers, library, City Hall, City park infrastructure, etc. Fifteen percent of the  non‐operating budget funding is reserved to account for any small, unanticipated expenses not  identified in the CIP document.             Fund 603 Total Available  $500,000 Operating Budget  $190,000 CIP Projects  $264,000 CIP 15% Contingency  $46,000   Capital Improvement Program FY 20/21 ‐ 22/23       15 | Page  Section III. FY 19/20 Completed Projects                                                            Essential Facilities – Fire Station 57  The new 9,855‐square‐foot, two‐story fire  station now houses five on‐duty fire  fighters/paramedics and accommodates six  on‐duty personnel. The core elements of  the new station include: three drive‐ through apparatus bays, apparatus support  spaces, public lobby, accessible restrooms,  office, kitchen, dining, dayroom, laundry  room, private sleeping quarters, unisex  restrooms, mechanical, electrical,  communications rooms, and staff parking.  Pickleweed Park Playground  Improvements  The Pickleweed Park Playground  Improvements replaced the outdated  playground with new play structures,  slides, swings, and other assorted play  features.  This project was funded  through a federal Community  Development Block Grant (CDBG).   Street Restriping 2018‐2019   The Restriping Project consisted of  upgrading existing traffic striping,  pavement markings, and markers along 12  miles of City streets to conform to new  striping standards for roadways. The new  thermoplastic striping will last many years  longer than previously‐installed paint and  be more visible to motorists.  Building Better Neighborhoods   16 | Page                 Capital Improvement Program FY 20/21 ‐ 22/23                                              City Hall Solar Panel Installation  During spring 2020, new solar panel  arrays were installed on the roof of City  Hall as well as in the lower parking lot.  This project assists the City in fulfilling its  goal of being ‘green’ and sustainable.       Francisco Bouelvard West Multi‐Use Pathway  (Andersen Drive to Rice Drive) – Phase I  As a highly‐desired capital improvement, the City  partnered with SMART to construct a 10‐foot wide,  ½‐mile long multi‐use path parallel to the railroad  tracks between Andersen Drive and Rice Drive.   Breaking ground in June 2018, the Pathway was  opened for service in July 2019.  Funding was a  combination of local City funds as well as grants  from the Transportation Authority of Marin,  Measure A (HIP), Metropolitan Transportation  Commission, State Local Partnership Program (LPP),  BAAQMD, and County of Marin.  Quiet Zone Implementation for  SMART’s Larkspur Extension  In partnership with SMART, the City  diligently worked to create a Quiet  Zone from Downtown San Rafael to  Larkspur such that the train horn is not  sounded when a train crosses a street.   Photo Credit: Cris Gebhardt Photography    Capital Improvement Program FY 20/21 ‐ 22/23       17 | Page  Other Completed Projects   Essential Facilities – Public Safety Center  o Construction of a new 44,000‐square‐foot Public Safety Center to co‐locate fire, police, and  emergency services. The project included a subterranean garage, public plaza, and landscaping  improvements.     Sea Level Rise Vulnerability Study  o This study focused on the ‘low hanging fruit’ in which recommendations were provided for  small‐scale improvements to reduce the impact of sea level rise. This study coincided with sea  level rise work underway by the Community Development Department and the General Plan  2040.     B Street Community Center Restroom Remodel  o Project included full demolition of the existing restrooms and installation of new ADA‐ compliant restrooms for women and men.      Street Resurfacing 2018‐2019 (annual project)  o Work included street resurfacing or rehabilitation on various streets throughout the City. The  project required coordination with residents, businesses, utility companies, and transit  operators to minimize disruption to the community.      Stormwater Operations and Maintenance (annual project)  o Maintenance of the City’s 12 pump stations.     Second and Third Streets Signalization Improvements at the Railroad Tracks  o Installation of new traffic signal indications at the railroad tracks to increase public safety, keep  motorists away from the tracks, and satisfy federal requirements for a Quiet Zone.      Andersen Drive Microseal  o Installation of a microseal street resurfacing product on Andersen Drive from Jacoby Street  south to the Central Marin Sanitation Agency wastewater treatment plant.     Merrydale North Promenade Study (i.e., Merrydale Pathway – North Connector)  o Preparation of various design alternatives, working in concert with residents and members of  the Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Committee.      Tivoli Lighting on Fourth Street (Shaver Street to Tamalpais Avenue)  o Installation of decorative street lighting across Fourth Street in the heart of Downtown San  Rafael.      Sidewalk Repair Program 2019‐2020  o Working hand‐in‐hand with community members, buckling sidewalks were replaced at many  locations across the City. As necessary, trees were removed to accommodate installation of  new sidewalks while reducing the possibility of future uplifting from tree roots.       18 | Page                 Capital Improvement Program FY 20/21 ‐ 22/23     Section IV: Upcoming Projects; Project Description and Budget Details  FUND 205: STORMWATER FUND  205.1  Rotary Manor Culvert Replacement  Project Information  The damaged corrugated metal pipe (CMP)  culvert located underground at Rotary Manor  requires replacement and reestablishment of  the community gardens above.              Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020‐21 FY 2021‐22 FY 2022‐23  Planning/Design 205 Stormwater  $164,000 $15,000   Construction External T.B.D. Fund Type   $750,000   Subtotal $164,000 $15,000  $750,000  Total Cost Estimate $929,000    205.2  San Quentin Pump Station Reconstruction  Project Information  The San Quentin Pump Station Reconstruction  project will construct a new station to convey  storm drain runoff from low‐lying areas into  the San Francisco Bay as well as rehabilitate  the existing discharge pipe located between  the station and the Bay.           Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020‐21 FY 2021‐22 FY 2022‐23  Planning/Design 205 Stormwater  $375,000   Construction 205 Stormwater  Grant: FEMA (unsecured)      Subtotal $375,000    Total Cost Estimate $375,000    Capital Improvement Program FY 20/21 ‐ 22/23       19 | Page  205.3  Storm Drain Replacement at 2111 Francisco Boulevard East  Project Information  The Bay Area Toll Authority (BATA) plans to  construct a widened sidewalk on Francisco  Boulevard East from the Bay Park Center  office complex to Grange Way. This work  will complete a gap closure in the  bicycle/pedestrian network connecting the  Richmond San Rafael Bridge to the  Andersen Drive flyover. Existing City storm  drain pipes under the proposed sidewalk  require replacement which should be  performed concurrently with the sidewalk  widening project or in advance in  conjunction with sanitary sewer work.    Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020‐21 FY 2021‐22 FY 2022‐23  Planning/Design 205 Stormwater    Construction 205 Stormwater  $100,000     Subtotal $100,000    Total Cost Estimate $100,000      205.4  MCSTOPPP – Catch Basin Trash Capture Feasibility Study  Project Information  Due to regulations imposed by the Marin  County Stormwater Pollution Prevention  Program, cities in Marin County will soon be  required to implement devices to capture and  remove trash from the storm drain system  before water is conveyed to San Francisco  Bay. This feasibility study will identify means  and methods as to how the City of San Rafael  can comply with these requirements.          Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020‐21 FY 2021‐22 FY 2022‐23  Planning/Design 205 Stormwater  206 Annual MCSTOPPP  Program  $30,000 $100,000    Construction 205 Stormwater      Subtotal $130,000    Total Cost Estimate $130,000      20 | Page                 Capital Improvement Program FY 20/21 ‐ 22/23     205.5  East Street at Jessup Street Storm Drain Improvements  Project Information  The neighborhood adjacent to East Street at  Jessup Street is one of the older areas of San  Rafael. Stormwater runoff is conveyed  downhill utilizing surface features such as  gutters and shallow storm drain pipes. The  neighborhood has experienced flooding as a  result of development reducing impervious  areas and antiquated drainage facilities. This  project proposes to install underground storm  drain pipe on Jessup Street between West  Street and East Street and connect to the  City’s existing system at Second Street and  East Street. At this time, only the design is  proposed to be moved forward until additional funds can be identified for construction.     Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020‐21 FY 2021‐22 FY 2022‐23  Planning/Design 205 Stormwater  $45,000  Construction 205 Stormwater      Subtotal $45,000   Total Cost Estimate $45,000      205.6 C Street Storm Drain Improvements – First to Second Streets  Project Information  The intersection of Second Street at C Street is  subject to flooding as a result of settlement of  storm drain pipes and the inability to  adequately convey water to the downstream  storm drain system. This project will make  pipe repairs as well as install a new  underground drainage system on C Street  from Second to First Streets. This first phase  will prepare the design only of the project.           Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020‐21 FY 2021‐22 FY 2022‐23  Planning/Design 205 Stormwater  $40,000  Construction 206 Gas Tax      Subtotal $40,000   Total Cost Estimate $40,000    Capital Improvement Program FY 20/21 ‐ 22/23       21 | Page  205.7  Los Gamos Road at Oleander Drive Flood Warning System  Project Information  The intersection of Los Gamos Road at  Oleander Drive frequently floods during major  rain events. After studying various drainage  alternatives, all of which would require  significant storm drain improvements both in  the public right‐of‐way as well as on private  property, this project proposes to install a  warning system to inform motorists of  possible flooding.           Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020‐21 FY 2021‐22 FY 2022‐23  Planning/Design 205 Stormwater    Construction 205 Stormwater  $50,000    Subtotal $50,000   Total Cost Estimate $50,000      205.8  First Street at D Street Storm Drain Improvements  Project Information  The intersection of First Street at D Street has  several storm drain pipes that feed into the  San Rafael Creek. This project proposes to  replace a corrugated metal pipe (CMP) storm  drain pipe on D Street between Frances Street  and First Street.             Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020‐21 FY 2021‐22 FY 2022‐23  Planning/Design 205 Stormwater    Construction 205 Stormwater  206 Annual CMP Program  $65,000 $100,000      Subtotal $165,000    Total Cost Estimate $165,000       22 | Page                 Capital Improvement Program FY 20/21 ‐ 22/23     205.9  Woodland Avenue Storm Drain Improvements  Project Information  Built in the early 1900s, the neighborhood  surrounding Woodland Avenue is subject to  occasional flooding as all rainwater is surface  runoff utilizing existing gutters. This project  proposes to install an underground drainage  system on Woodland Avenue between Eva  Street and Picnic Avenue that connects to an  open ditch behind 254 Woodland Avenue via a  drainage easement on private property.             Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020‐21 FY 2021‐22 FY 2022‐23  Planning/Design 205 Stormwater    $100,000 Construction 205 Stormwater      Subtotal  $100,000  Total Cost Estimate $100,000         Capital Improvement Program FY 20/21 ‐ 22/23       23 | Page  FUND 206: GAS TAX    206.1  Southern Heights Bridge Replacement  Project Information  The Southern Heights Bridge is a wood  bridge constructed decades ago with its last  significant renovation occurring in 1981. The  bridge was subject to immediate closure in  December 2017 upon inspection by Caltrans  bridge inspectors. The City has completed  design and construction is scheduled to  begin in 2020.            Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020‐21 FY 2021‐22 FY 2022‐23  Planning/Design 206 Gas Tax  Grant: Caltrans HBP  $3,000 $718,000    Construction Grant: Caltrans HBP  $4,000,000     Subtotal $721,000 $4,000,000    Total Cost Estimate $4,721,000      206.2  Third Street at Hetherton Street Improvements  Project Information  The intersection of Third Street at Hetherton  Street is one of the busiest in San Rafael with  a large volume of not only vehicles but  pedestrians as well. This project will replace  traffic signal equipment, install one  wheelchair ramp on the northeast corner,  install a new crosswalk on the east leg, and  eliminate the existing crosswalk on the south  leg of the intersection.          Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020‐21 FY 2021‐22 FY 2022‐23  Planning/Design 206 Gas Tax  Grant: Caltrans HSIP  $25,000 $60,000    Construction Grant: Caltrans HSIP  $500,000     Subtotal $585,000    Total Cost Estimate $585,000        24 | Page                 Capital Improvement Program FY 20/21 ‐ 22/23     206.3  Smith Ranch Road and Lucas Valley Road Resurfacing  Project Information  Lucas Valley Road/Smith Ranch Road from  Highway 101 to Redwood Highway resides  within State of California right‐of‐way. This  project will remove the top layer of existing  asphalt pavement and resurface the roadway  with new asphalt. Additionally, new wheelchair  ramps will be installed to comply with ADA  requirements.            Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020‐21 FY 2021‐22 FY 2022‐23  Planning/Design 206 Gas Tax  $8,000   Construction 206 Gas Tax (RMRA)  $1,210,000     Subtotal $1,218,000    Total Cost Estimate $1,218,000    206.4  Francisco Boulevard West Multi‐Use Pathway Phase II  Project Information  In 2019, the City partnered with SMART to  complete construction of a multi‐use pathway  between Andersen Drive and Rice Drive  parallel to the railroad tracks as part of Phase  I of this project. Phase II will install a bicycle  pathway on Francisco Boulevard West  between Second Street and Rice Drive by  converting the roadway to a one‐way  southbound street allowing the City to  repurpose the other travel lane on the  roadway into a bicycle pathway. This project  completes the regional bicycle facility from  Larkspur to Downtown San Rafael.     Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020‐21 FY 2021‐22 FY 2022‐23  Planning/Design Grant: CNRC Urban Green $250,000   Construction Grant: TDA Article 3  Grant: CNRC Urban Green  Grant: TAM Measure AA  Grant: MUP Phase I  Rollover from BAAQMD    $568,000 $950,000 $400,000 $100,000      Subtotal $250,000 $2,018,000    Total Cost Estimate $2,268,000    Capital Improvement Program FY 20/21 ‐ 22/23       25 | Page  206.5  Francisco Boulevard East Sidewalk Widening   Project Information  The existing sidewalk along Francisco  Boulevard East is utilized daily by pedestrians  and bicyclists that must navigate the  congestion of fire hydrants and power poles.  This project will install an 8‐foot‐wide  sidewalk/bike pathway on Francisco Boulevard  East between Vivian Street and Grand Avenue.                Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020‐21 FY 2021‐22 FY 2022‐23  Planning/Design 206 Gas Tax  $318,000   Construction Grant: Caltrans CMAQ  Grant: Caltrans ATP  $4,025,000  $2,100,000     Subtotal $4,343,000 $2,100,000    Total Cost Estimate $6,443,000      206.6  Northbound 101 Offramp – Second Right Turn Lane  Project Information  This project includes the installation of a  second right‐turn lane from the northbound  Central San Rafael offramp onto Second  Street.  Construction for this improvement will  be funded by Caltrans in conjunction with  their bridge replacement project scheduled to  start in late 2020.                Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020‐21 FY 2021‐22 FY 2022‐23  Planning/Design 206 Gas Tax  $41,000   Construction 206 Gas Tax      Subtotal $41,000    Total Cost Estimate $41,000          26 | Page                 Capital Improvement Program FY 20/21 ‐ 22/23     206.7  Third Street Safety Improvements: Lindaro Street to Union Street  Project Information  Funded in part by a Caltrans Highway Safety  Improvement Program grant, this project will  install new wheelchair ramps, modify traffic  signals, install a new communications  network, and rehabilitate the asphalt  pavement.             Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020‐21 FY 2021‐22 FY 2022‐23  Planning/Design 206 Gas Tax  Grant: Caltrans HSIP  $31,000 $280,000    Construction 206 Gas Tax (RMRA)  Grant: TAM Measure A  Grant: Caltrans HSIP  246 Traffic Mitigation      $1,000,000  $1,000,000  $1,295,000  $800,000    Subtotal $311,000 $4,095,000   Total Cost Estimate $4,406,000    206.8 – Third Street Rehabilitation: Miracle Mile to Lindaro Street  Project Information  The City received major allocation from the  Transportation Authority of Marin through the  Measure A program to rehabilitate Third  Street. In 2019, the City completed a  Feasibility Study for Third Street corridor.  Since then, the corridor has been subdivided  into two City projects with this project  covering Miracle Mile to Lindaro Street. The  Third Street Safety Improvements project will  make roadway improvements from Lindaro to  Union. The intent of the improvements is to  provide congestion relief and safety  improvements along Third Street.    Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020‐21 FY 2021‐22 FY 2022‐23  Planning/Design Grant: TAM Measure A  $1,300,000   Construction Grant: Local Partnership Grant: TAM Measure A     $1,500,000  $8,700,000    Subtotal $1,300,000 $10,200,000   Total Cost Estimate $11,500,000    Capital Improvement Program FY 20/21 ‐ 22/23       27 | Page  206.9  Canal Neighborhood Pedestrian Improvements  Project Information  The scope of work for this pedestrian  improvement project includes installation of  solar powered flashing beacons, additional  warning signage in advance of crosswalks,  and ADA‐compliant wheelchair ramps at up  to five intersections.                 Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020‐21 FY 2021‐22 FY 2022‐23  Planning/Design 206 Gas Tax  $58,000   Construction 206 Gas Tax  Grant: Lifeline Phase 3    $35,000 $248,000      Subtotal $58,000 $283,000    Total Cost Estimate $341,000      206.10  Francisco Boulevard East Resurfacing  Project Information  This project includes removal of the existing  asphalt and resurfacing Francisco Boulevard  East from Vivian Way to Grand Avenue.  Adjustment of utilities covers and installation  of new striping is included in the scope of  work.                    Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020‐21 FY 2021‐22 FY 2022‐23  Planning/Design 206 Gas Tax    Construction 206 Gas Tax (RMRA)  $1,600,000     Subtotal $1,600,000    Total Cost Estimate $1,600,000          28 | Page                 Capital Improvement Program FY 20/21 ‐ 22/23     206.11  B Street at Woodland Avenue: Box Culvert Ceiling Repairs  Project Information  Feeding into the upper reaches of San Rafael  Creek is a reinforced concrete box culvert  conveying water away from the Gerstle Park  neighborhood. A small portion of the ceiling of  the culvert requires rehabilitation to provide  better structural stability of the system. This  project will consider alternatives to replacing  or repairing the top slab as well as  coordination with utility companies and  regulatory environmental agencies.          Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020‐21 FY 2021‐22 FY 2022‐23  Planning/Design 206 Gas Tax  $10,000 $30,000   Construction 206 Gas Tax  $300,000     Subtotal $10,000 $330,000    Total Cost Estimate $340,000      206.12  Public Safety Center Street Resurfacing  Project Information  With the new Public Safety Center (PSC)  nearing completion and portions of the  roadways surrounding the PSC to be  converted to two‐way traffic, this project will  resurface with either asphalt or slurry seal the  following: C Street (Mission to Fourth), D  Street (Fifth to Fourth), Fifth Avenue (A to Ray  Court), and Via Sessi. The project scope will  also include installation of a retaining wall at  the end of Via Sessi and installation of a  concrete bulbout on the southwest corner of  D Street at Fifth Avenue.        Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020‐21 FY 2021‐22 FY 2022‐23  Planning/Design 206 Gas Tax  $16,000   Construction 206 Gas Tax  $465,000     Subtotal $16,000 $465,000    Total Cost Estimate $481,000      Capital Improvement Program FY 20/21 ‐ 22/23       29 | Page  206.13  Woodland Avenue Retaining Wall  Project Information  Adjacent to 132 Woodland Avenue is a wood  retaining wall that supports an asphalt  pathway sidewalk. The retaining wall has  deteriorated and needs rehabilitation or  replacement. This project will review retaining  wall alternatives, construct a concrete  sidewalk, curb, gutter, and other safety  improvements in this location.                Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020‐21 FY 2021‐22 FY 2022‐23  Planning/Design 206 Gas Tax   $75,000   Construction 206 Gas Tax  $420,000    Subtotal $75,000 $420,000   Total Cost Estimate $495,000      206.14  San Rafael High School Crosswalk Improvements  Project Information  San Rafael High School has secured grant  funding to support the design and construction  of a mid‐block pedestrian crosswalk to allow  students and the public to safely cross Third  Street east of Union Street. The City, partnering  with San Rafael City Schools District, will  administer the construction contract and  contribute to the construction budget.             Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020‐21 FY 2021‐22 FY 2022‐23  Planning/Design 206 Gas Tax     Construction 206 Gas Tax  Grant: TAM Measure A    $100,000 $100,000  $300,000    Subtotal $200,000 $300,000   Total Cost Estimate $500,000          30 | Page                 Capital Improvement Program FY 20/21 ‐ 22/23     206.15  Lincoln Avenue Bridge Repair Study  Project Information  Recent Caltrans bridge inspection reports  indicate that the Lincoln Avenue bridge over  Mahon Creek needs repair. This project will  evaluate what rehabilitation work is required  to provide for continued use of the bridge  long‐term. The City will also seek grant  funding from Caltrans to perform any repairs  to the bridge.              Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020‐21 FY 2021‐22 FY 2022‐23  Planning/Design 206 Gas Tax  $12,000   Construction Grant: Caltrans HBP  Unsecured         Subtotal $12,000    Total Cost Estimate $12,000      206.16  First Street at Mahon Creek Wall Repair  Project Information  During a winter storm, a small portion of an  existing rock retaining wall washed out. This  project includes the repair of the wall, which is  located on First Street between D Street and E  Street.                   Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020‐21 FY 2021‐22 FY 2022‐23  Planning/Design 206 Gas Tax  $16,000   Construction 206 Gas Tax  $250,000    Subtotal $16,000 $250,000   Total Cost Estimate $266,000        Capital Improvement Program FY 20/21 ‐ 22/23       31 | Page  206.17  Bungalow Avenue Resurfacing  Project Information  Bungalow Avenue, which is an older street  with a concrete road below, requires  resurfacing. The project will include  installation of wheelchair ramps,  rehabilitation of the underground storm drain  system, and improved drainage to mitigate  flooding at Woodland Avenue.                  Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020‐21 FY 2021‐22 FY 2022‐23  Planning/Design 206 Gas Tax  $50,000   Construction 206 Gas Tax   $525,000     Subtotal $575,000    Total Cost Estimate $575,000      206.18  Southern Heights Boulevard at Courtright Road Retaining Wall  Project Information  Southern Heights Boulevard at the intersection  of the private driveway of Courtright Road  shows signs of settlement. This project will  install a retaining wall system to support the  roadway.                     Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020‐21 FY 2021‐22 FY 2022‐23  Planning/Design 206 Gas Tax  $148,000 $30,000   Construction 206 Gas Tax    $600,000   Subtotal $148,000 $30,000   $600,000  Total Cost Estimate $778,000          32 | Page                 Capital Improvement Program FY 20/21 ‐ 22/23     206.19  Schoen Park Modifications  Project Information  As a result of installing new playground  amenities at the nearby Pickleweed Park, the  City proposes to repurpose the existing area  of Schoen Park to create additional on‐street  parking and help alleviate, in part, the  demand for public parking in the Canal and  Spinnaker Point neighborhoods.                Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020‐21 FY 2021‐22 FY 2022‐23  Planning/Design 206 Gas Tax  $73,000 $10,000   Construction 206 Gas Tax  $675,000     Subtotal $73,000 $685,000    Total Cost Estimate $758,000      206.20  Fairhills Drive Slide Repair: Feasibility Study  Project Information  This study will consider three separate  locations on Fairhills Drive in which settlement  of the roadway appears possible near 216,  407, and 447 Fairhills Drive.                     Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020‐21 FY 2021‐22 FY 2022‐23  Planning/Design 206 Gas Tax  $40,000  Construction 206 Gas Tax      Subtotal $40,000   Total Cost Estimate $40,000        Capital Improvement Program FY 20/21 ‐ 22/23       33 | Page  206.21  Center Street Resurfacing  Project Information  Center Street located in the Sun Valley  neighborhood, which is an older street with a  concrete road below, requires resurfacing.  The project will include installation of  wheelchair ramps and improvements to the  storm drain system.                  Funding Source  Prior Funding  FY 2020‐21  FY 2021‐22  FY 2022‐23  Planning/Design 206 Gas Tax    $60,000 Construction 206 Gas Tax      Subtotal  $60,000  Total Cost Estimate $60,000    206.22  Fourth Street Curb Ramp Replacement  Project Information  Fourth Street in Downtown San Rafael is the  heart of the downtown business district with a  large volume of pedestrians. This project will  study and identify pedestrian improvements  at intersections between E Street and Grand  Avenue.               Funding Source  Prior Funding  FY 2020‐21  FY 2021‐22  FY 2022‐23  Planning/Design 206 Gas Tax    $60,000 Construction 206 Gas Tax      Subtotal  $60,000  Total Cost Estimate $60,000          34 | Page                 Capital Improvement Program FY 20/21 ‐ 22/23     206.23  Forbes Avenue at H Street Storm Drain Improvement  Project Information  This small drainage improvement will install a  new catch basin on the northwest corner of  the intersection and connect it to an existing  catch basin on the northeast corner.  Coordination with various utility companies  may be necessary to allow for installation of  the proposed storm drain pipe.               Funding Source  Prior Funding  FY 2020‐21  FY 2021‐22  FY 2022‐23  Planning/Design 206 Gas Tax    Construction 206 Gas Tax  $30,000     Subtotal $30,000    Total Cost Estimate $30,000         Capital Improvement Program FY 20/21 ‐ 22/23       35 | Page    FUND 208: CHILDCARE FUND  208.1  Childcare Portable Building Replacement   Project Information  The scope of work includes replacement of  portable buildings used for childcare centers at  the Mary Silveira and Lucas Valley school  campuses as well as the Pickleweed Preschool  adjacent to the Albert J. Boro Community  Center.                 Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020‐21 FY 2021‐22 FY 2022‐23  Planning/Design 208 Childcare  $166,000   Construction 208 Childcare      Subtotal $166,000    Total Cost Estimate $166,000      Capital Improvement Program FY 20/21 ‐ 22/23       36 | Page    FUND 235: BAYPOINT LAGOON ASSESSMENT DISTRICT  235.1  Cayes Pump Station Control System  Project Information  The Cayes pump station was originally  constructed in the 1960s and is operated  manually with no remote access. The project  will upgrade the pump station controls to allow  for remote monitoring and control of  equipment, include coordination with PG&E to  upgrade the electrical service, and provide  connection to the City’s existing SCADA  system. More automated control of the water  level will reduce the potential odors caused by  hot weather and algae growth in the adjacent  lagoon located within the Baypoint Lagoons  Assessment District. Additional construction  funding is required to support this project. The grant funds noted below will subsidize the procurement of  materials but may require additional City funding.      Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020‐21 FY 2021‐22 FY 2022‐23  Planning/Design 235 Baypoint Lagoon AD CIP Engineering Operating  Budget  $74,000 $6,000    Construction Grant: CDBG   Grant: Unsecured Funds  $85,328      Subtotal $80,000 $85,328    Total Cost Estimate $165,328         Capital Improvement Program FY 20/21 ‐ 22/23       37 | Page  FUND 241: MEASURE A – PARKS   241.1  Park and Recreation Master Plan  Project Information  In consultation with the Parks and Recreation  Commission, the City will review the conditions  of all parks and playground structures to  understand deficiencies and where future  improvements should be focused to meet  current codes and ADA regulations. This  assessment will become part of a Park and  Recreation Master Plan.             Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020‐21 FY 2021‐22 FY 2022‐23  Planning/Design 241 Measure A ‐ Parks  $150,000   Construction 241 Measure A ‐ Parks      Subtotal $150,000    Total Cost Estimate $150,000           38 | Page                 Capital Improvement Program FY 20/21 ‐ 22/23     FUND 246: TRAFFIC MITIGATION FUND  246.1  Bike Connection from Second/Tamalpais to Third/Tamalpais  Project Information  Beginning in summer 2020, the City will install  a bicycle cycle‐track on Francisco Boulevard  West between Rice Drive and Second Street.  This project will consider improvements on  Tamalpais Avenue between Second and Third  Streets to receive cyclists exiting the cycle‐ track on the south side of Second Street.              Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020‐21 FY 2021‐22 FY 2022‐23  Planning/Design 246 Traffic Mitigation  $10,000   Construction 246 Traffic Mitigation  $30,000     Subtotal $40,000    Total Cost Estimate $40,000      246.2  C and D Streets Conversion to Two‐way Streets  Project Information  In conjunction with opening of the new Public  Safety Center, located on Fifth Avenue  between C and D Streets, the City will convert  C Street (First Street to Fifth Avenue) and D  Street (Second Street to Fifth Avenue) to two‐ way traffic.               Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020‐21 FY 2021‐22 FY 2022‐23  Planning/Design 246 Traffic Mitigation    Construction 246 Traffic Mitigation  $120,000     Subtotal $120,000    Total Cost Estimate $120,000  Capital Improvement Program FY 20/21 - 22/23 39 | P a g e 246.3 ⎯ Downtown Traffic Signal Modernization Project Information The traffic signals in the Downtown San Rafael area play a critical role in keeping traffic moving. The Innovative Developments to Enhance Arterials, or IDEA, grant-funded project will improve traffic signal equipment throughout the Downtown area at many busy intersections. Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020-21 FY 2021-22 FY 2022-23 Planning/Design 246 Traffic Mitigation $300,000 Construction 246 Traffic Mitigation Grant: MTC IDEA $192,000 $830,000 Subtotal $1,322,000 Total Cost Estimate $1,322,000 246.4 ⎯ Safe Pathways Pedestrian Crossing Improvements Project Information Pedestrian crosswalk improvements near schools are important safety projects for the City. This project will create painted bulb-outs and install rectangular rapid flashing beacons at four crosswalks at Mission/Park, Mission/Alice, Fifth/River Oaks, and Knight/Ashwood. Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020-21 FY 2021-22 FY 2022-23 Planning/Design Grant: TAM Measure A $40,000 Construction 246 Traffic Mitigation Grant: TAM Measure A $300,000 $160,000 Subtotal $40,000 $460,000 Total Cost Estimate $500,000 40 | P a g e Capital Improvement Program FY 20/21 - 22/23 246.5 – Fourth Street Signal System Improvements: B Street to Cijos Street Project Information Fourth Street is the heart of the Downtown Business District conveying pedestrians, bicyclists, and motorists through San Rafael. The existing traffic signal system needs to be updated to meet current design standards and ensure reliability of the system for all types of users. Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020-21 FY 2021-22 FY 2022-23 Planning/Design 246 Traffic Mitigation $50,000 Construction 246 Traffic Mitigation $200,000 Subtotal $50,000 $200,000 Total Cost Estimate $250,000 246.6 – Citywide Traffic Signal Battery Backup Systems Project Information During Fall 2019, Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E) de-energized electrical lines throughout Marin County and the Bay Area as a safety precaution. The events, known as Public Safety Power Shutoffs (PSPS), resulted in traffic signals going dark and thus impacting traffic throughout the City. This on-going project proposes to install battery backup systems at critical signalized intersections to ensure traffic flow during PSPS events and other power disruptions. Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020-21 FY 2021-22 FY 2022-23 Planning/Design 246 Traffic Mitigation Construction 246 Traffic Mitigation $75,000 $75,000 $75,000 Subtotal $75,000 $75,000 $75,000 Total Cost Estimate $225,000   Capital Improvement Program FY 20/21 ‐ 22/23       41 | Page  246.7 – North San Rafael Traffic Signal Connections  Project Information  Coordination of traffic signals is a critical  element to keeping traffic moving. This project  includes upgrading existing communication  equipment which allows signals to work in  tandem. The area of focus is traffic signals near  the Northgate Mall.                 Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020‐21 FY 2021‐22 FY 2022‐23  Planning/Design 246 Traffic Mitigation  $50,000   Construction 246 Traffic Mitigation    $75,000   Subtotal $50,000   $75,000  Total Cost Estimate $125,000      246.8 – Bellam Boulevard and Vista Del Mar Pedestrian Improvements  Project Information  The intersection of Bellam Boulevard at Vista  Del Mar is heavily traveled by pedestrians  shopping at the Cardenas Market grocery  store. To increase pedestrian safety and  visibility, this project will install rectangular  rapid flashing beacons at the crosswalk as  well as reconfigure parking on Bellam  Boulevard between Visa Del Mar and  Windward Way to create additional on‐street  parking.            Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020‐21 FY 2021‐22 FY 2022‐23  Planning/Design 246 Traffic Mitigation  $20,000   Construction 246 Traffic Mitigation –  Annual Citywide Crosswalk  Program    $100,000     Subtotal $20,000 $100,000    Total Cost Estimate $120,000        42 | Page                 Capital Improvement Program FY 20/21 ‐ 22/23     246.9  Second Street Intersection Improvements  Project Information  Second Street is a major thoroughfare through  Downtown San Rafael. This project will  rehabilitate critical intersections and includes  pavement resurfacing, wheelchair ramps, and  traffic signal upgrades with new  communication equipment.                    Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020‐21 FY 2021‐22 FY 2022‐23  Planning/Design 246 Traffic Mitigation  $280,000 $100,000   Construction 246 Traffic Mitigation    $200,000   Subtotal $280,000 $100,000   $200,000  Total Cost Estimate $580,000        Capital Improvement Program FY 20/21 ‐ 22/23       43 | Page    FUND 420: MEASURE E – ESSENTIAL FACILITIES   420.1  Fire Station 54 and 55 Remodel  Project Information  Work includes remodeling of the existing fire stations to meet current state and local codes for the safety of  the firefighters and the residents they serve. This is part of Phase II of the strategic plan approved in July 2015  for essential public safety facilities.               Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020‐21 FY 2021‐22 FY 2022‐23  Planning/Design 420 Measure E  $655,000   Construction 420 Measure E  $6,718,000     Subtotal $655,000 $6,718,000    Total Cost Estimate $7,373,000      420.2  Repurposing of Former City Hall Police Station  Project Information  This project includes re‐examining the first‐floor  space at City Hall, which will be vacated as the  Police Department occupies the new Public  Safety Center.  Reconfiguration of the space will  be needed to house other City departments.                   Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020‐21 FY 2021‐22 FY 2022‐23  Planning/Design 420 Measure E    Construction 420 Measure E  $400,000     Subtotal $400,000    Total Cost Estimate $400,000  Fire Station 54 Fire Station 55    44 | Page                 Capital Improvement Program FY 20/21 ‐ 22/23     FUND 501: PARKING SERVICES  501.1 – Seismic Upgrades to Parking Structure – Fifth Avenue/C Street  Project Information  The parking garage at Fifth Avenue/C Street will be  studied with improvements designed. This study  will build upon previous work at this location.                        Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020‐21 FY 2021‐22 FY 2022‐23  Planning/Design 501 Parking Services  $25,000  Construction 501 Parking Services      Subtotal $25,000   Total Cost Estimate $25,000      Capital Improvement Program FY 20/21 ‐ 22/23       45 | Page    FUND 603: BUILDING MAINTENANCE  603.1 – Albert Park Ball Field: ADA Wheelchair Ramp and Access Improvements  Albert Park Ball Field is utilized throughout the  year for sporting events. This project includes  ADA improvements, including a new  wheelchair ramp adjacent to an existing  staircase as well as improvements to the  disabled parking stall and path of travel to the  ball park field.                   Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020‐21 FY 2021‐22 FY 2022‐23  Planning/Design 603 Building Maintenance $40,000   Construction 603 Building Maintenance $140,000    Subtotal $40,000 $140,000   Total Cost Estimate $180,000      603.2 – Albert Park Ball Field: ADA Restrooms  This project will review alternatives and  production of design documents for  installation of an ADA‐compliant,  prefabricated restroom.                       Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020‐21 FY 2021‐22 FY 2022‐23  Planning/Design 603 Building Maintenance $30,000   Construction 603 Building Maintenance $130,000  $90,000   Subtotal $30,000 $130,000  $90,000  Total Cost Estimate $250,000        46 | Page                 Capital Improvement Program FY 20/21 ‐ 22/23     603.3 – Gerstle Park Restroom Repair  Project Information  The Facility Assessment Study, which was  completed in 2018, identified deficiencies  within several City facilities.  This project is  based on the recommendations in the study and  includes replacing the siding of an existing  restroom at Gerstle Park.                 Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020‐21 FY 2021‐22 FY 2022‐23  Planning/Design 603 Building Maintenance   Construction 603 Building Maintenance $30,000    Subtotal $30,000   Total Cost Estimate $30,000      603.4 – Shoreline Park Restroom  Project Information  The restroom has been non‐operational and closed  for several years. Repairs are necessary to restore  proper functioning of the restroom. The new  restroom installed will be built to meet the latest  ADA standards.                 Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020‐21 FY 2021‐22 FY 2022‐23  Planning/Design 603 Building Maintenance   Construction 603 Building Maintenance $140,000     Subtotal $140,000    Total Cost Estimate $140,000          Capital Improvement Program FY 20/21 ‐ 22/23       47 | Page  603.5 – City Hall: Council Chambers Accessibility and Security Improvements  Project Information  The project includes security upgrades to the  Council Chambers for emergency access as  well as installation of an ADA‐compliant  wheelchair ramp within the Chambers.                    Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020‐21 FY 2021‐22 FY 2022‐23  Planning/Design 603 Building Maintenance $9,000   Construction 603 Building Maintenance $175,000     Subtotal $9,000 $175,000    Total Cost Estimate $184,000      603.6 – B Street Community Center: Stage Area Electrical Panel Upgrade  Project Information  The B Street Community Center stage has been  well used over many decades. The electrical  panel system for stage lighting requires  replacement to meet current electrical codes.                      Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020‐21 FY 2021‐22 FY 2022‐23  Planning/Design 603 Building Maintenance   Construction 603 Building Maintenance   $160,000   Subtotal   $160,000  Total Cost Estimate $160,000          48 | Page                 Capital Improvement Program FY 20/21 ‐ 22/23     Section V: Rating Categories and Project Ratings  RATING CATEGORIES WEIGHTING 7 - 10 strong contribution toward public health & safety and/or reduction of City liability 7 - 10 strong support from community/Council aligns with City goals 10 grant funded, urgent 7 - 10 urgent repair/rehab/ replacement of City asset necessary 4 - 6 some improvement to public health & safety and/or reduction of City liability 4 - 6 some support from community/Council meets City objectives 7 3 grant funded, upcoming timeline grant funded, no timeline 4 - 6 repair/rehab/replacement of City asset should be completed eventually 0 - 3 little improvement to public health & safety and/or reduction of City liability 0 - 3 little support from community/Council little contribution toward City goals 0 not time sensitive 0 - 3 repair/rehab/replacement of City asset can be deferred 20% RANK SCORING 1 to 10 35%20% Priority Initiative Time-Sensitive Funds 25% Health / Safety / Liability Maintain/Enhance Functionality Health/ Safety/ Uobility: Pro j ects t h a a r e • critica l to pubU h ea lth a ind sa e t or s ig rnfi ca 1tl · r e duc e t h e City's · i's lk o ' li aib illi y will ·eceive a h i'g:ne · r a ·i ing . T i s category i n cl udes . roj e . .s \vh icn aJ Y ,e t h e res . Ito Uti ga io . P'rr ority lnltiotive: ThE s c t egory ass i gns prioritr · to p roje•cts b ased on h e c· . ,..s g o Is i n lu clin g t h e gu id i in g p rii 1cip les of T . get h e r San Ra ael1 th e General, Pl n 1 om1m un it . rid/or c· Cou T ii s up porte :d p roj e c 1ts 1 a ·1d eq uny. Tim ,e Se·nsitive .Fvnds: C IP proj e s f un de:.: .,y s t t e /fe d e r I grants ofte n h a ve ' u 1d i ng . ea dliri es . Gran -fun ded p r o j e c ts wrn be ra e d 1E g h e , a n , consi er t imel 'tcf -u se-of-' n d re:q u i r e ·me n ts fir on, 1e gra n t En g agency. Maintain/Enhance Funct;onol;ty: Th Es t ego ry ra es p roj ect s ac ord in g to t ri e i 111porta n ce ari d urge n of t 1e . roposed r e . a ir~ r e a Uirtart:io ,, or rep I ce e t. P ... o.s e ,d 11 E 1te n a 1 e , ·1aJt n b e , de e rir ed will . e · ated ~ow e r 1I rian pressing m a i nte n n ee on a crit11ca ~ Ci y· asse1:. Project Rating System Health / Safety / Liability Priority Initiative Time- Sensitive Funds Maintain / Enhance Functionality 35%20%25%20% 205 Stormwater Rotary Manor Culvert Replacement ACTIVE 30%7.5 10 10 0 10 205 Stormwater San Quentin Pump Station Reconstruction ACTIVE 60%7.1 10 8 0 10 205 Stormwater Storm Drain Replacement at 2111 Francisco Boulevard East ACTIVE 60%5.8 8 6 0 9 205 Stormwater MCSTOPP: Catch Basin Trash Capture: Feasibility Study 0%5.7 7 8 0 8 205 Stormwater East Street at Jessup Street Storm Drain Improvements 10%5.4 8 5 0 8 205 Stormwater C Street Storm Drain Improvements - First to Second Streets 0%5.1 6 6 0 9 205 Stormwater Los Gamos Road at Oleander Drive Flood Warning System 10%5.0 8 7 0 4 205 Stormwater First Street at D Street Storm Drain Improvements 0%4.6 5 5 0 9 205 Stormwater Woodland Avenue Storm Drain Improvements 0%4.4 5 5 0 8 205 Stormwater Las Casas Drainage Basin Repair 10%4.2 5 5 0 7 205 Stormwater Piombo Pump Station: Electrical Panel Replacement 0%4.0 4 5 0 8 205 Stormwater Levee Analysis Inventory Study 0%3.1 3 8 0 2 205 Stormwater Spinnaker Point Salt Marsh Remediation (Conceptual Design Only)0%1.7 2 3 0 2 206 Gas Tax - RMRA Third Street Safety Improvements: Lindaro to Union ACTIVE 30%8.9 9 8 10 8 206 Gas Tax Third Street Rehabilitation: Miracle Mile to Lindaro ACTIVE 30%7.8 8 8 7 8 206 Gas Tax Canal Neighborhood Pedestrian Improvements ACTIVE 30%7.3 9 8 7 4 206 Gas Tax - RMRA Francisco Boulevard East Resurfacing 10%7.0 8 8 3 9 206 Gas Tax B St at Woodland Ave: Box Culvert Ceiling Repairs 0%7.0 10 8 0 9 206 Gas Tax Public Safety Center Street Resurfacing 0%7.0 9 10 0 9 206 Gas Tax Woodland Ave Retaining Wall 0%6.8 9 9 0 9 206 Gas Tax San Rafael High School Crosswalk Improvements 6.7 8 8 5 5 206 Gas Tax Lincoln Avenue Bridge Repair Study ACTIVE 10%6.4 7 7 3 9 206 Gas Tax First Street at Mahon Creek Wall Repair 60%6.4 9 8 0 8 206 Gas Tax - RMRA Bungalow Avenue Resurfacing ACTIVE 30%6.3 6 9 3 8 206 Gas Tax Southern Heights at Courtright Road Retaining Wall ACTIVE 60%6.2 9 7 0 8 206 Gas Tax Schoen Park Modifications ACTIVE 30%5.7 6 10 0 8 206 Gas Tax Fairhills Drive Slide Repair: Feasibility Study 10%5.6 8 7 0 7 206 Gas Tax - RMRA Center Street Resurfacing 60%5.3 5 6 3 8 206 Gas Tax Fourth Street Curb Ramp Replacement 0%5.3 7 7 0 7 206 Gas Tax Forbes Avenue at H Street Storm Drain Improvement 0%5.1 7 6 0 7 206 Gas Tax - RMRA Redwood Hwy Resurfacing (Civic Center to Smith Ranch)0%4.9 5 5 3 7 206 Gas Tax Mission Ave (Boyd Park) Sidewalk Gap Closure (front of Falkirk)0%4.1 7 5 0 3 206 Gas Tax Merrydale Pathway - North Connector Study ACTIVE 90%4.0 5 8 0 3 206 Gas Tax 121 Irwin St Headwall/Weir 10%3.3 3 4 0 7 206 Gas Tax Lincoln Avenue Curb Ramps ACTIVE 60%3.2 4 4 0 5 206 Gas Tax Riviera Drive Resurfacing - Phase 1 10%3.2 4 4 0 5 206 Gas Tax Riviera Drive Resurfacing - Phase 2 10%3.2 4 4 0 5 206 Gas Tax Manderly Road Medians 0%2.9 3 5 0 4 206 Gas Tax Freitas Parkway and Montecillo Intersection (K-rail Only)0%2.7 6 3 0 0 RANK SCORING 1 to 10 PROJECT NAMEFUNDING SOURCE STATUS % DESIGN COMPLETE Project Rating System Health / Safety / Liability Priority Initiative Time- Sensitive Funds Maintain / Enhance Functionality 35%20%25%20% 208 Childcare Fund Childcare Portable Building Replacement (Silveira/Pickleweed/Lucas Valley) ACTIVE 10%7.5 10 10 0 10 208 Childcare Fund Childcare Portable Building Replacement (Vallecito)5.3 7 7 0 7 208 Childcare Fund Parkside Preschool Playground Tent Replacement 5.3 7 6 0 8 235 Baypoint Lagoon Assessment DistrictCayes Pump Station Control System ACTIVE 60%6.1 6 7 3 9 241 Measure A: Parks Park and Recreation Master Plan 6.2 8 9 0 8 241 Measure A: Parks Bernard Hoffman Playground Improvements 6.0 8 6 0 10 241 Measure A: Parks Gerstle Park Tennis Court Resurfacing and ADA Improvements 5.9 7 8 0 9 241 Measure A: Parks Peacock Gap Tennis Court Resurfacing and ADA Improvements 5.9 7 8 0 9 241 Measure A: Parks Boyd Park Tennis Court Resurfacing and ADA Improvements 5.9 7 8 0 9 241 Measure A: Parks Santa Margarita Tennis/Basketball Court Resurfacing and ADA Improvements 5.9 7 8 0 9 241 Measure A: Parks Sun Valley Park Playground Improvements 5.5 7 7 0 8 241 Measure A: Parks Peacock Gap Park Playground Improvements 4.9 6 7 0 7 241 Measure A: Parks Gerstle Park Playground Improvements 4.4 5 7 0 6 241 Measure A: Parks Boyd Park Playground Improvements 4.0 5 5 0 6 241 Measure A: Parks Pickleweed Park Field Renovation ACTIVE 60%3.2 1 10 0 4 241 Measure A: Parks Terra Linda Community Center: Pool Shade Structure 3.1 3 4 0 6 241 Measure A: Parks Terra Linda Community Center: Basketball Court Repaving 2.9 3 4 0 5 241 Measure A: Parks Bernard Hoffman Drainage and Irrigation Improvements 2.0 1 3 0 5 241 Measure A: Parks Starkweather Park Improvements 1.8 1 3 0 4 246 Traffic Mitigation Third Street Intersection Improvements: Grand to Lindaro ACTIVE see 206 ---- 246 Traffic Mitigation Safe Pathways Pedestrian Crossing Improvements 6.8 7 7 7 6 246 Traffic Mitigation Fourth Street Signal System Improvements: B Street to Cijos Street 6.6 8 7 3 8 246 Traffic Mitigation Citywide Traffic Signal Battery Backup Systems 6.0 7 7 3 7 246 Traffic Mitigation North San Rafael Traffic Signal Connections 6.0 7 7 3 7 246 Traffic Mitigation Bellam Boulevard and Vista Del Mar Pedestrian Improvements 5.8 7 7 3 6 246 Traffic Mitigation Second Street Intersection Improvements ACTIVE 0%5.3 6 8 0 8 246 Traffic Mitigation Fifth Avenue Signal System Improvements: Court to E Street 5.1 5 6 3 7 246 Traffic Mitigation Freitas and Las Gallinas: Left turn signal head 5.1 6 5 3 6 246 Traffic Mitigation Fourth Street at Miracle Mile Intersection Improvements 4.9 5 5 3 7 246 Traffic Mitigation Safe Routes to School: Davidson Phase 2 4.7 5 5 3 6 246 Traffic Mitigation Bellam Blvd and Andersen Dr Intersection Improvements 4.7 5 4 3 7 246 Traffic Mitigation North San Pedro and Merrydale Intersection: Feasibility Study 0%3.7 6 3 0 5 420 Measure E: Essential Facilities Fire Stations 54 & 55 Remodel 7.5 10 10 0 10 420 Measure E: Essential Facilities Repurposing of Former City Hall Police Station ACTIVE 5.1 3 10 0 10 501 Parking Services Seismic Upgrades to Parking Structures at Third/A Street and Third/C Street 0%6.9 10 9 0 8 501 Parking Services Seismic Upgrades to Parking Structure at Fifth Avenue/C Street 50%6.9 10 9 0 8 501 Parking Services Fifth Street and Garden Parking Lot Resurfacing 0%6.2 8 9 0 8 501 Parking Services Seismic Upgrades to Parking Structure at Third/Lootens 0%4.7 10 0 0 6 RANK SCORING 1 to 10 FUNDING SOURCE PROJECT NAME STATUS % DESIGN COMPLETE Project Rating System Health / Safety / Liability Priority Initiative Time- Sensitive Funds Maintain / Enhance Functionality 35%20%25%20% 603 Building Maintenance Albert Park Ball Field: ADA Wheelchair Ramp and Access Improvements 10%7.5 10 10 0 10 603 Building Maintenance City Asset Condition Assessment Study 0%7.5 10 10 0 10 603 Building Maintenance Albert Park Ball Field: ADA Restrooms 0%6.5 10 10 0 5 603 Building Maintenance City Hall/Library Fire Sprinkler System (Study/Design Only)0%6.5 10 8 0 7 603 Building Maintenance Gerstle Park Restroom Repair 0%6.3 10 5 0 9 603 Building Maintenance Shoreline Park Restroom ACTIVE 100%6.3 10 5 0 9 603 Building Maintenance City Hall: Council Chambers Accessibility and Security Improvements 90%6.1 10 7 0 6 603 Building Maintenance B Street Community Center: Stage Area Electrical Panel Upgrade 100%5.9 10 5 0 7 603 Building Maintenance City Hall: Server Room Sewer Repair 0%5.1 7 7 0 6 603 Building Maintenance Terra Linda Pool House Electrical Upgrades 0%4.9 7 5 0 7 603 Building Maintenance B Street Community Center: Parking Lot Resurfacing 0%4.5 7 5 0 5 603 Building Maintenance Pickleweed Park Resilience Hub 0%4.3 6 6 0 5 603 Building Maintenance Terra Linda Community Center: HVAC Replacement 0%3.1 3 5 0 5 603 Building Maintenance A.J. Boro Community Center: HVAC Repair 0%3.1 3 5 0 5 603 Building Maintenance Resurface City Hall Parking Lots, Lower and Upper 0%2.9 3 4 0 5 603 Building Maintenance Downtown Library: Reroof 0%2.7 3 3 0 5 603 Building Maintenance Victor Jones Park Restroom Repair 0%2.7 3 3 0 5 603 Building Maintenance Court Street Plaza Fountain Repair 0%2.1 2 2 0 5 603 Building Maintenance Downtown Library: Children's Patio Enclosure 0%2.1 2 3 0 4 603 Building Maintenance Terra Linda Recreation Center Hardscape Repair 0%2.1 2 2 0 5 603 Building Maintenance A.J. Boro Community Center: Parking Lot Expansion (Schoen Park)10%2.0 0 5 0 5 603 Building Maintenance Downtown Library: Restroom Addition 0%0.8 0 2 0 2 FUNDING SOURCE PROJECT NAME STATUS % DESIGN COMPLETE RANK SCORING 1 to 10   Capital Improvement Program FY 20/21 ‐ 22/23       53 | Page    Section VI: Project Funding Tables    Planning / Design Construction Planning / Design Construction Planning / Design Construction Planning / Design Construction Stormwater System Maintenance 205 $705,300 $623,000 $623,000 $623,000 MCSTOPP: Catch Basin Trash Capture 206 See 205 Fund Below Bridge Maintenance 206 $100,000 $100,000 $100,000 Replace CMP Storm Drains 206 See 205 Fund Below $100,000 $100,000 Sidewalk Repair Program 206 $350,000 $350,000 $350,000 $350,000 Pavement Management Program 206 $800,000 $600,000 $1,200,000 Bike and Pedestrian Master Plan Implementation 246 $100,000 $100,000 $100,000 $100,000 Citywide Crosswalk Improvements 246 $100,000 See 246 Fund Below $100,000 $100,000 Facility Repairs 603 $120,000 $120,000 $120,000 Planning / Design Construction Planning / Design Construction Planning / Design Construction Planning / Design Construction Rotary Manor Culvert Replacement 7.5 $164,000 $15,000 External (Non-Stormwater Account) Fund $750,000 San Quentin Pump Station Reconstruction 7.1 $375,000 Grant: Unsecured Storm Drain Replacement at 2111 Francisco Boulevard East 5.8 $100,000 MCSTOPP: Catch Basin Trash Capture: Feasibility Study 5.7 $30,000 Other Funds: Annual Program 'MCSTOPP: Catch Basin Trash Capture '$100,000 East Street at Jessup Street Storm Drain Improvements 5.4 $45,000 C Street Storm Drain Improvements - First to Second Streets 5.1 $40,000 Los Gamos Road at Oleander Drive Flood Warning System 5 $50,000 First Street at D Street Storm Drain Improvements 4.6 $65,000 Other Funds: Annual Program 'Replace CMP Storm Drains'$100,000 Woodland Avenue Storm Drain Improvements 4.4 $100,000 Unfunded Projects Shown Below Las Casas Drainage Basin Repair 4.2 Piombo Pump Station: Electrical Panel Replacement 4 Levee Analysis Inventory Study 3.1 Spinnaker Point Salt Marsh Remediation (Conceptual Design Only)1.7 Grant: Measure AA (Unsecured) Subtotal Fund 205 Only $210,000 $135,000 $100,000 Subtotal Non-205 Funds $200,000 $0 $750,000 Grand Total (All Fund Types)$410,000 $135,000 $850,000 Planning / Design Construction Planning / Design Construction Planning / Design Construction Planning / Design Construction Southern Heights Bridge Replacement In Progress $3,000 Grant: Caltrans HBP $718,000 $4,000,000 Third Street at Hetherton Street Improvements In Progress $25,000 Grant: Caltrans HSIP $60,000 $500,000 Smith Ranch Road Resurfacing In Progress $8,000 SB1: Road Maintenance & Rehab Account (RMRA)$1,210,000 Francisco Boulevard West MUP Phase II In Progress Grant: TDA Funds Article 3 $568,000 Grant: California Natural Resources Agency - Urban Greening Grant $250,000 $950,000 Grant: TAM Safe Pathways $400,000 Grant: Air Quality Management District Grant (MUP Phase I rollover)$100,000 Francisco Boulevard East Sidewalk Widening In Progress $318,000 Grant: Caltrans ATP $4,025,000 Grant: Caltrans CMAQ $2,100,000 NB 101 Offramp - Second Right Turn Lane In Progress $41,000 Third Street Safety Improvements: Lindaro to Union 8.9 $31,000 SB1: Road Maintenance & Rehab Account (RMRA)$1,000,000 Grant: Measure A Major Road Improvements $1,000,000 Grant: Caltrans HSIP $280,000 $1,295,000 Transfer from Fund 246 $800,000 Third Street Rehabilitation: Miracle Mile to Lindaro 7.8 Grant: State-Local Partnership Program $1,500,000 Grant: Measure A Major Road Improvements $1,300,000 $8,700,000 Canal Neighborhood Pedestrian Improvements 7.3 $58,000 $35,000 Grant: Lifeline Phase 3 $248,000 Francisco Boulevard East Resurfacing 7 SB1: Road Maintenance & Rehab Account (RMRA)$1,600,000 B St at Woodland Ave: Box Culvert Ceiling Repairs 7 $10,000 $30,000 $300,000 Public Safety Center Street Resurfacing 7 $16,000 $465,000 Woodland Ave Retaining Wall 6.8 $75,000 $420,000 San Rafael High School Crosswalk Improvements 6.7 $100,000 Grant: TAM Safe Pathways $100,000 $300,000 Lincoln Avenue Bridge Repair Study 6.4 $12,000 Grant: Unsecured First Street at Mahon Creek Wall Repair 6.4 $16,000 $250,000 Bungalow Avenue Resurfacing 6.3 $50,000 $525,000 Southern Heights at Courtright Road Retaining Wall 6.2 $148,000 $30,000 $600,000 Schoen Park Modifications 5.7 $73,000 $10,000 $675,000 Fairhills Drive Slide Repair: Feasibility Study 5.6 $40,000 Center Street Resurfacing 5.3 $60,000 Fourth Street Curb Ramp Replacement 5.3 $60,000 Grant: Unsecured Forbes Avenue at H Street Storm Drain Improvement 5.1 $30,000 Unfunded Projects Shown Below Redwood Hwy Resurfacing (Civic Center to Smith Ranch)4.9 SB1: Road Maintenance & Rehab Account (RMRA) Mission Ave (Boyd Park) Sidewalk Gap Closure (front of Falkirk)4.1 Merrydale Pathway - North Connector Study 4 $181,244 Grant: Unsecured 121 Irwin St Headwall/Weir 3.3 $6,200 Lincoln Avenue Curb Ramps 3.2 $195,000 Riviera Drive Resurfacing - Phase 1 3.2 $19,000 Riviera Drive Resurfacing - Phase 2 3.2 Manderly Road Medians 2.9 Freitas Parkway and Montecillo Intersection (K-rail Only)2.7 Subtotal Fund 206 Only $2,325,000 $710,000 $720,000 Subtotal RMRA Funds Only $1,600,000 $1,000,000 $0 Subtotal Other Funds (Non-206/Non-RMRA)$8,466,000 $13,595,000 $0 Grand Total (All Fund Types)$12,391,000 $15,305,000 $720,000 FY 2021-22 FY 2022-23 Project Name Rank Scoring 1 to 10 Prior Funding Project Name Rank Scoring 1 to 10 FY 2022-23 Fund 206 - Gas Tax Annual Programs FY 2022-23 Prior Funding FY 2020-21 FY 2021-22 Fund 205 - Stormwater Project Name Funding Source Prior Funding FY 2020-21 FY 2021-22 FY 2020-21 Planning / Design Construction Planning / Design Construction Planning / Design Construction Planning / Design Construction Childcare Portable Building Replacement (Silveira/Pickleweed/Lucas Valley)7.5 $166,000 Unfunded Projects Shown Below Parkside Preschool Playground Tent Replacement 5.3 Childcare Portable Building Replacement (Vallecito)5.3 Total from Fund 208 $0 $0 $0 Planning / Design Construction Planning / Design Construction Planning / Design Construction Planning / Design Construction Cayes Pump Station Control System 6.1 $74,000 Transfer from CIP Engineering Operating Budget $6,000 Grant: CDBG 2020-22 $85,328 Grant: Unsecured Subtotal Fund 235 Only $0 $0 $0 Subtotal Non-235 Funds $85,328 Grand Total (All Fund Types)$85,328 Planning / Design Construction Planning / Design Construction Planning / Design Construction Planning / Design Construction Park and Recreation Master Plan 6.2 $150,000 Bernard Hoffman Playground Improvements 6 Peacock Gap Tennis Court Resurfacing and ADA Improvements 5.9 Grant: Prop 68 Per Capita Santa Margarita Tennis/Basketball Court Resurfacing and ADA Improvements 5.9 Grant: Prop 68 (Unsecured) Gerstle Park Tennis Court Resurfacing and ADA Improvements 5.9 Boyd Park Tennis Court Resurfacing and ADA Improvements 5.9 Sun Valley Park Playground Improvements 5.5 Peacock Gap Park Playground Improvements 4.9 Gerstle Park Playground Improvements 4.4 Boyd Park Playground Improvements 4 Pickleweed Park Field Renovation 3.2 $20,000 Unfunded Projects Shown Below Terra Linda Community Center: Pool Shade Structure 3.1 Terra Linda Community Center: Basketball Court Repaving 2.9 Bernard Hoffman Drainage and Irrigation Improvements 2 Starkweather Park Improvements 1.8 Total from Fund 241 $150,000 $0 $0 Planning / Design Construction Planning / Design Construction Planning / Design Construction Planning / Design Construction Third Street Safety Improvements: Lindaro to Union (transfer to Fund 206)See 206 $300,000 $500,000 Bike Connection from Second/Tamalpais to Third/Tamalpais In Progress $10,000 $30,000 C and D Streets Conversion to Two-way Streets In Progress $120,000 Downtown Traffic Signal Modernization In Progress $300,000 $192,000 Grant: MTC Innovative Developments to Enhance Arterials (IDEA)$830,000 Safe Pathways Pedestrian Crossing Improvements 6.8 $300,000 Grant: TAM Safe Pathways $40,000 $160,000 Fourth Street Signal System Improvements: B Street to Cijos Street 6.6 $50,000 $200,000 Citywide Traffic Signal Battery Backup Systems 6 $75,000 $75,000 $75,000 North San Rafael Traffic Signal Connections 6 $50,000 $75,000 Bellam Boulevard and Vista Del Mar Pedestrian Improvements 5.8 $20,000 Other Funds: Annual Program 'Citywide Crosswalk Improvements'$100,000 Second Street Intersection Improvements 5.3 $280,000 $100,000 $200,000 Unfunded Projects Shown Below Fifth Avenue Signal System Improvements: Court to E Street 5.1 Freitas and Las Gallinas: Left turn signal head 5.1 Fourth Street at Miracle Mile Intersection Improvements 4.9 Bellam Blvd and Andersen Dr Intersection Improvements 4.7 Safe Routes to School: Davidson Phase 2 4.7 North San Pedro and Merrydale Intersection: Feasibility Study 3.7 Subtotal 246 Funds $675,000 $375,000 $1,050,000 Subtotal Non-246 Funds $160,000 $0 $0 Grand Total (All Fund Types)$835,000 $375,000 $1,050,000 Planning / Design Construction Planning / Design Construction Planning / Design Construction Planning / Design Construction Fire Stations 54 & 55 Remodel 7.5 $655,000 $6,718,000 Repurposing of Former City Hall Police Station 5.1 $400,000 Total from Fund 420 $7,118,000 $0 $0 Planning / Design Construction Planning / Design Construction Planning / Design Construction Planning / Design Construction Seismic Upgrades to Parking Structure at Fifth Avenue/C Street 6.9 $25,000 Unfunded Projects Shown Below Seismic Upgrades to Parking Structures at Third/A Street and Third/C Street 6.9 Fifth Street and Garden Parking Lot Resurfacing 6.2 Seismic Upgrades to Parking Structure at Third/Lootens 4.7 Total from Fund 501 $0 $25,000 $0 Fund 241 - Measure A: Parks FY 2022-23 Project Name Rank Scoring 1 to 10 Prior Funding FY 2020-21 Fund 246 - Traffic Mitigation Fund 420 - Essential Facilities Fund 501 - Parking Services FY 2021-22 FY 2022-23 Project Name Rank Scoring 1 to 10 Prior Funding FY 2020-21 FY 2021-22 FY 2021-22 Project Name Rank Scoring 1 to 10 Prior Funding FY 2020-21 Project Name Rank Scoring 1 to 10 FY 2022-23 FY 2021-22Prior Funding Anticipated projects to be funded in future years pending outcome of the Citywide Playground/Park Assessment Study to be completed during FY 20/21. Project Name Rank Scoring 1 to 10 Prior Funding FY 2020-21 FY 2021-22 FY 2022-23 Fund 235 - Baypoint Lagoon Assessment District FY 2020-21 FY 2022-23 Project Name Rank Scoring 1 to 10 Prior Funding FY 2020-21 FY 2021-22 FY 2022-23 Fund 208 - Childcare Planning / Design Construction Planning / Design Construction Planning / Design Construction Planning / Design Construction Albert Park Ball Field: ADA Wheelchair Ramp and Access Improvements 7.5 $40,000 $140,000 Albert Park Ball Field: ADA Restrooms 6.5 $30,000 $130,000 $90,000 Gerstle Park Restroom Repair 6.3 $30,000 Shoreline Park Restroom 6.3 $140,000 City Hall: Council Chambers Accessibility and Security Improvements 6.1 $9,000 $175,000 B Street Community Center: Stage Area Electrical Panel Upgrade 5.9 $160,000 Unfunded Projects Shown Below Terra Linda Pool House Electrical Upgrades 4.9 B Street Community Center: Parking Lot Resurfacing 4.5 Pickleweed Park Resilience Hub 4.3 A.J. Boro Community Center: HVAC Repair 3.1 Terra Linda Community Center: HVAC Replacement 3.1 Resurface City Hall Parking Lots, Lower and Upper 2.9 Downtown Library: Reroof 2.7 Victor Jones Park Restroom Repair 2.7 Court Street Plaza Fountain Repair 2.1 Downtown Library: Children's Patio Enclosure 2.1 Terra Linda Recreation Center Hardscape Repair 2.1 A.J. Boro Community Center: Parking Lot Expansion (Schoen Park)2 Downtown Library: Restroom Addition 0.8 Total from Fund 603 $245,000 $300,000 $250,000 FY 2022-23 Fund 603 - Building Maintenance Prior Funding FY 2020-21 FY 2021-22 Project Name Rank Scoring 1 to 10   Capital Improvement Program FY 20/21 ‐ 22/23       57 | Page    Section VII: Project Locations    List of CIP Projects Label Project Name Label Project Name 205.1 Rotary Manor Culvert Replacement 205.2 San Quentin Pump Station Reconstruction 205.3 Storm Drain Replacement at 2111 Francisco Boulevard East  205.4 MCSTOPP: Catch Basin Trash Capture: Feasibility Study 205.5 East Street at Jessup Street Storm Drain Improvements 205.6 C Street Storm Drain Improvements ‐ First to Second Streets 205.7 Los Gamos Road at Oleander Drive Flood Warning System Label Project Name 205.8 First Street at D Street Storm Drain Improvements 235.1 Cayes Pump Station Control System 205.9 Woodland Avenue Storm Drain Improvements Label Project Name Label Project Name 246.1 Bike Connection from Second/Tamalpais to Third/Tamalpais 206.1 Southern Heights Bridge Replacement 246.2 C and D Streets Conversion to Two‐way Streets 206.2 Third Street at Hetherton Street Improvements 246.3 Innovative Developments to Enhance Arterials (IDEA) Grant 206.3 Smith Ranch Road and Lucas Valley Road Resurfacing 246.4 Fourth Street Signal System Improvements: B Street to Cijos Street 206.4 Francisco Boulevard West MUP Phase II 246.5 North San Rafael Traffic Signal Connections 206.5 Francisco Boulevard East Sidewalk Widening 246.6 Second Street Intersection Improvements 206.6 NB 101 Offramp ‐ Second Right Turn Lane 206.7 Third Street Safety Improvements: Lindaro to Union 206.8 Third Street Rehabilitation: Miracle Mile to Lindaro 206.9 Canal Neighborhood Pedestrian Improvements Label Project Name 206.10 Francisco Boulevard East Resurfacing 420.1 Fire Station 54 & 55 Remodel 206.11 B St at Woodland Ave: Box Culvert Ceiling Repairs 420.2 Repurposing of Former City Hall Police Station 206.12 Public Safety Center Street Resurfacing 206.13 Woodland Ave Retaining Wall 206.14 San Rafael Highschool Crosswalk Improvements 206.15 Lincoln Avenue Bridge Repair Study Label Project Name 206.16 First Street at Mahon Creek Wall Repair 501.1 Seismic Upgrades to Parking Structure at Fifth Avenue/C Street 206.17 Bungalow Avenue Resurfacing 206.18 Southern Heights at Courtright Road Retaining Wall 206.19 Schoen Park Modifications 206.20 Fairhills Drive Slide Repair: Feasibility Study Label Project Name 206.21 Center Street Resurfacing 603.1 Albert Park Ball Field: ADA Wheelchair Ramp and Access Improvements 206.22 Fourth Street Curb Ramp Replacement 603.2 Albert Park Ball Field: ADA Restrooms  206.23 Forbes Street at H Street: Storm Drain Improvement 603.3 Gerstle Park Restroom Repair 603.4 Shoreline Park Restroom 603.5 City Hall: Council Chambers Accessibility and Security Improvements 603.6 B Street Community Center: Stage Area Electrical Panel Upgrade Fund 420 ‐ Essential Facilities Fund 501 ‐ Parking Services Fund 603 ‐ Building Maintenance 208.1 Childcare Portable Building Replacement  (Silveira, Pickleweed and Lucas Valley) Fund 235 ‐ Baypoint Lagoon  Assessment District Fund 205 ‐ Stormwater Fund 206 ‐ Gas Tax Fund 208 ‐ Childcare Fund 246 ‐ Traffic Mitigation 205 206 206 Lines 208 235 246 246 Lines 420 501 603 Legend 205 206 206 Lines 208 235 246 246 Lines 420 501 603 LegendCIP Project Map: North San Rafael \ ...... .....,_ I I " \ l ~ . .,. 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" I i ,1' I' •. , ... ·, \ .. l Cover Page Attachment 5. – Resolution Approving Fiscal Year 2020-2021 Gann Appropriations Limit, and Exhibits A and B Exhibit 1 – Gann Limitation Calculation Fiscal Year 2020-21 Exhibit 2 – City of San Rafael Appropriation Limit Analysis FY 2020-21 RESOLUTION NO. 14831 A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF SAN RAFAEL APPROVING FISCAL YEAR 2020-2021 GANN APPROPRIATIONS LIMIT AT $143,208,909 WHEREAS, California Constitution Article XIIIB, which was approved as Proposition 4 by the voters of the State of California on November 6, 1979, imposes on the state and on each local jurisdiction a limitation on the amount of budget appropriations they are permitted to make annually (the “Appropriations Limit”, sometimes referred to as the “Gann Appropriations Limit”) and limits changes in the Appropriations Limit to an annual adjustment for the change in the cost of living and the change in population; and WHEREAS, California Government Code Section 7910, which implements Article XIIIB, requires that the governing body of each local jurisdiction shall establish its Appropriations Limit at a regularly scheduled meeting or noticed special meeting; and WHEREAS, as permitted by Proposition 111, adopted by the voters in 1990, the City has elected to use the percent change in the population of San Rafael from January 1, 2019 to January 1, 2020, and the percent change in California’s per capita personal income, for the calculation of the annual adjustment to the City’s Appropriations Limit; and WHEREAS, documentation used in the determination of the City’s Appropriations Limit has been available to the public in the Finance Department as provided by Government Code Section 7910; NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the City Council of San Rafael, pursuant to the provisions of Article XIIIB and Government Code Sections 7901 through 7914, does hereby establish the Appropriations Limit for fiscal year 2020-2021 for the City of San Rafael at $143,208,909 as documented in Exhibit A, and further establishes the 2020-2021 Appropriations Subject to the Gann Appropriations Limit at $73,554,079 as documented in Exhibit B, which Exhibits are attached hereto and incorporated herein by reference as though fully set forth. I, LINDSAY LARA, Clerk of the City of San Rafael, hereby certify that the foregoing resolution was duly and regularly introduced and adopted at a regular meeting on the City Council of said City held on Monday, the 15th day of June 2020, by the following vote to wit: AYES: COUNCILMEMBERS: Bushey, Colin, McCullough & Mayor Phillips NOES: COUNCILMEMBERS: None ABSENT: COUNCILMEMBERS: Gamblin LINDSAY LARA, City Clerk EXHIBIT A GANN LIMITATION CALCULATION Fiscal Year 2020-21 (A)(B) Fiscal Cost of Living Change in Population Factor Prior Year Current Year Subject to Variance Year Change in Limitation Limitation Gann Limit Gann 'gap' Assessment California Roll for Change in Change in Per Capita Nonresidential Population for Population for Personal Income Or Construction San Rafael Or Marin County (Highest B X (Source : State) (Source : County)(Source: State)(Source: State)Highest A) 94/95 24,635,128$ 95/96 4.72 0.60 1.22 1.060000 x 24,635,128$ =26,113,235$ 96/97 4.67 5.50 1.37 1.43 1.070000 x 26,113,235$ =27,941,557$ 97/98 4.67 5.40 2.17 1.64 1.080000 x 27,941,557$ =30,176,882$ 98/99 4.15 6.80 1.42 1.56 1.080000 x 30,176,882$ =32,591,032$ 99/00 4.53 6.26 1.47 1.62 1.079800 x 32,591,032$ =35,192,257$ 00/01 4.91 9.27 1.50 1.82 1.112600 X 35,192,257$ =39,154,905$ 01/02 7.82 6.67 0.53 0.72 1.086000 X 39,154,905$ =42,522,227$ 02/03 -1.27 5.15 0.69 0.81 1.060000 X 42,522,227$ =45,073,561$ 03/04 2.31 2.43 1.45 0.77 1.039152 X 45,073,561$ =46,838,297$ 04/05 3.28 2.06 -0.16 2.53 1.058900 X 46,838,297$ =49,597,072$ 39,274,542$ 10,322,530$ 05/06 5.26 1.59 0.07 0.33 1.056100 X 49,597,072$ =52,379,468$ 43,215,534$ 9,163,934$ 06/07 3.96 0.57 0.49 0.74 1.047300 X 52,379,468$ =54,857,017$ 47,167,477$ 7,689,540$ 07/08 a 4.42 2.09 0.97 0.97 1.054300 X 54,857,017$ =58,867,753$ 53,279,474$ 5,588,279$ 08/09 4.29 2.63 0.68 0.93 1.052600 X 58,867,753$ =61,964,197$ 54,394,753$ 7,569,444$ 09/10 0.62 6.65 0.57 0.81 1.075100 X 61,964,197$ =66,617,708$ 51,368,817$ 15,248,891$ 10/11 -2.54 39.62 0.79 0.93 1.409200 X 66,617,708$ =93,877,675$ 48,469,424$ 45,408,251$ 11/12 b 2.51 -34.13 0.81 0.90 1.034300 X 93,877,675$ =100,987,679$ 50,180,413$ 50,807,266$ 12/13 3.77 0.12 0.92 1.05 1.048600 X 100,987,679$ =105,895,680$ 51,825,702$ 54,069,978$ 13/14 c 5.12 2.09 0.34 0.42 1.055600 X 105,895,680$ =110,641,157$ 54,313,859$ 56,327,297$ 14/15 -0.23 0.85 0.39 0.42 1.012700 X 110,641,157$ =112,046,300$ 56,717,201$ 55,329,098$ 15/16 d 3.82 7.99 0.60 0.73 1.087800 X 112,046,300$ =117,140,576$ 65,177,999$ 51,962,576$ 16/17 5.37 0.68 0.12 0.33 1.057200 X 117,140,576$ =123,841,017$ 71,967,785$ 51,873,231$ 17/18 3.69 0.11 0.25 0.18 1.039500 X 123,841,017$ =128,732,737$ 74,893,075$ 53,839,661$ 18/19 3.67 0.06 -0.02 0.17 1.038500 X 128,732,737$ =133,688,947$ 77,599,200$ 56,089,748$ 19/20 3.85 0.26 0.04 -0.01 1.038900 X 133,688,947$ =138,889,447$ 82,867,376$ 56,022,071$ 20/21 e 3.73 1.91 -0.66 -0.60 1.031100 X 138,889,447$ =143,208,909$ 73,554,079$ 69,654,830$ = Value selected for Factor calculation (a) Includes increase for Paramedic Tax Revenue Generated by Measure P (b) Includes increase for Paramedic Tax Revenue Generated by Measure I Note: (c) Reduce the limit by $1,142,323 to reflect the amount associated with Measure P at the time the limit was increased in fiscal year 2011-2012 for Measure I (d) 2015-16 - The Limit is reduced by $4,743,389 for the Paramedic Tax - Measure I for the increase of $3,890,000 added in 2011 - 2012 that "Sunset" or Expired after 4 years at the end of 2015. County assessment roll factor for FY10/11 is an outlier. Reclaculate using State per capita income factor for FY10/11 to ensure that the city falls below the Gann limit under each scenario for conservatism. (e) 2020-21 - Appropriations subject to the limit declined due to both the reduction in budgeted revenues as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic as well as the exclusion of debt service on the 2018 bonds beginning in FY21. $- $20,000,000 $40,000,000 $60,000,000 $80,000,000 $100,000,000 $120,000,000 $140,000,000 $160,000,000 GANN Limit Calculations Current Year Limitation Subject to Gann Limit W:\Accounting and Budgeting\Budget\20-21\Gann Limit FY20-21\Gann Limit Calculation 20-21-Exh A - 6/5/2020 - - -- ~ -f---f-- f---f---f---f---f-- f---f---f---f--- - ~ f-- -f---f---f--~ -~ -~ f F ~ -~ -~ --~ -~ -~ -~ ~ -~ -~ - - ~ -~ -~ -~ □ • EXHIBIT B City of San Rafael Appropriation Limit Analysis FY 2020-21 2020-2021 2020-2021 Less Less Appropriations Adopted Exempt Non-Tax Subject to Total Appropriations Fund # Budget Expenditures Revenues Gann Limit General Fund 001 76,560,408$ 797,467$ 12,414,662$ 63,348,279$ Abandoned Vehicle Abatement Fund 200 162,146 1,309 160,100 737 Storm Water Fund 205 840,000 - 836,424 3,576 Emergency Medical Services Fund 210 8,142,999 166,309 3,192,047 4,784,643 Library Fund 214 40,000 - 18,000 22,000 Library Special Assessment Fund 215 1,097,531 13,942 - 1,083,589 Measure G - Cannabis 216 300,001 952 - 299,049 General Plan Special Revenue Fund 218 1,464,130 7,156 776,956 680,018 Recreation Revolving Fund 222 3,869,165 49,245 1,868,377 1,951,543 Police Youth Service fund 230 98,760 983 75,000 22,777 Measure A Open Space Fund 241 365,003 - - 365,003 Measure C Wildfire Prevention Parcel Tax 242 313,225 1,673 - 311,552 Open Space Fund 405 - - - - LongTerm Capital Outlay (Excess of $100K & 10yr Life) N/A - - - - General Fund Debt Service - Capital Outlays N/A 5,020,811 4,339,498 - 681,313 Total Appropriations 98,274,180$ 5,378,534$ 19,341,566$ 73,554,079$ Appropriation Limit from Revised Growth Limit 143,208,909$ Available Room Under Appropriation Limit 69,654,830$ W:\Accounting and Budgeting\Budget\20-21\Gann Limit FY20-21\Gann Limit Growth 20-21-Exh B