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CD General Plan 2020 UpdateSAN RAFAEL THE CITY WITH A MISSION Agenda Item No: 5.a Meeting Date: December 5, 2016 SAN RAFAEL CITY COUNCIL AGENDA REPORT Department: Community Development Prepared by: Raffi Boloyan, City Manager Approval: Planning Manager TOPIC: General Plan Amendments Implementing 10 Year Status Report SUBJECT: a. RESOLUTION ADOPTING ADDENDUM NO. 4 TO THE CERTIFIED SAN RAFAEL GENERAL PLAN 2020 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT (FEIR) (SCH# 2003052031) PREPARED FOR GENERAL PLAN AMENDMENTS (GPA15-001) (10 YEAR REVIEW POLICY AND MAP UPDATES) b. RESOLUTION APPROVING AMENDMENTS TO SAN RAFAEL GENERAL PLAN 2020 IMPLEMENTING THE 10 -YEAR REVIEW OF THE GENERAL PLAN POLICIES AND PROGRAMS COMPLETED IN 2015, INCLUDING A NEW WATER LAND USE DESIGNATION, AND DELETION OR REVISION OF POLICIES AND PROGRAMS THAT HAVE BEEN IMPLEMENTED IN THE VARIOUS ELEMENTS OF THE GENERAL PLAN 2020; CITY OF SAN RAFAEL, APPLICANT; FILE NO. GPA15-01 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: In May 2015, the Planning Division completed review of a 10 -year status report covering progress that had been made toward implementing the City of San Rafael General Plan 2020 since its 2004 adoption. The status report was presented to the Planning Commission on June 9, 2015, and the City Council on July 20, 2015. This General Plan Amendment project, GPA15-001, addresses the amendments recommended in the 10 year status report. On August 23, 2016 the General Plan Amendment, including Addendum No. 4 to the General Plan 2020 Final Environmental Impact Report (FEIR) was presented to the Planning Commission. The Commission unanimously recommended approval of the amendments to the City Council, with one modification. The amendments revise several Goals, Policies and Programs in each of the 16 General Plan 2020 Elements. In addition, a number of amendments to the Land Use Maps have been identified. These revisions have been made to keep the document current, reflecting completed actions and programs, and changes in circumstances and conditions. All of the revisions made to the General Plan 2020 are consistent with the recommendations of the 10 -year status report and would not result in any significant changes to growth and development anticipated under General Plan 2020. FOR CITY CLERK ONLY File No.: 115 (2020) Council Meeting: 12/05/2016 Disposition: Resolution 14241 and Resolution 14242 SAN RAFAEL CITY COUNCIL AGENDA REPORT / Page: 2 RECOMMENDATION: It is recommended that the City Council take the following action adopting two separate Resolutions: 1. Resolution Adopting Addendum No. 4 to the General Plan 2020 FEIR; and 2. Resolution Approving the General Plan Amendments (GPA15-001) to both the elements and land use map of the General Plan 2020. BACKGROUND: The San Rafael General Plan 2020 provides the framework for future development within the City over a 20 -year long range planning period. The General Plan is primarily comprised of two main parts, Elements and a Land Use Map. The Elements, or topical areas, contain written policies and programs, as well as additional figures or exhibits. The San Rafael General Plan contains 16 "Elements", including a required Housing Element and Land Use Elements. The Land Use Map designates locations deemed suitable for various land uses in the City including, but not limited to, housing, commercial, industrial, parks and open space lands. General Plan 2020 was adopted in 2004. Since then, the General Plan has been amended numerous times in response to changing circumstance and requirements that necessitated updates. These changes included the adoption of the Sustainability Element, update of Housing Elements for the 4th and 5th cycle Regional Housing Numbers Allocation (RHNA), completion of Station Area Plans, dissolution of the Redevelopment Agency, as well as other actions taken through the course of implementing the General Plan. City Council Resolution No. 8379 establishes General Plan Amendment Procedures, allowing up to four amendments per year (consistent with State Law). Multiple amendments may be grouped as one action. One of the four amendments per year is reserved for use by the City with the other three amendments available for private applicant proposals. General Plan amendments must be referred to adjacent towns and agencies, districts, and certain regional, state and federal agencies. This amendment has been processed following the procedures of City Council Resolution 8379. The City has not received any other General Plan amendment requests or proposals for 2016. The City of San Rafael prepares an annual review of its General Plan, in a manner consistent with requirements of state law. In May 2015, the City completed and published a 10 -Year Status Report of the General Plan policies and programs to assess the approaches, challenges and accomplishments of General Plan implementation. This review was prepared with input from members of a Working Group consisting of representatives from many City departments. The recommendations on program modifications contained in the status report have served as guidance for updates to the General Plan Elements and Land Use Map. The 10 -Year Status Report has been posted on City website and can be accessed via the following link: httr)://www.citvofsanrafael.ora/commdev-r)lannina-r)roi-ar)10vrr)t. On August 23, 2016, the Planning Commission reviewed the proposed General Plan Amendments (GPA15-001), including the EIR addendum that was prepared. The Planning Commission ultimately recommended approval of the amendments, with one change. The recommended modification was to make both the Community Development and Parking Services Departments responsible for Housing Policy H-1 5a. Therefore, the Commission adopted the following two Resolutions, • Resolution No. 16-21 recommending to the City Council adoption of Addendum No 4 to the General Plan 2020 EIR for the proposed amendments; and SAN RAFAEL CITY COUNCIL AGENDA REPORT / Page: 3 Resolution No. 16-22 recommending to the City Council approval of the General Plan amendments, with the one modification to Policy H-1 5a. The video from the Planning Commission meeting and staff report can be accessed on the City website via the following link: httr)://www.citvofsanrafael.orq/meetinqs/. ANALYSIS: The changes to the General Plan 2020 that are being recommended to the policies and programs fall into three general categories: completion, deletion and revision. Following action on the amendments staff would prepare an updated Land Use Map, and then review the Zoning Ordinance and Map for any corrections necessary to ensure consistency between the General Plan and Zoning regulations. Minor corrections to some of the zoning designations applied to properties affected by the Map updates are anticipated. Staff will also evaluate whether there are any corrections or revisions recommended to the zoning code text. As noted in the General Plan 2020 10 -Year Status Report, the majority of the General Plan 2020 Programs are being carried forward with little or no change. The Commission had made comments on five main topic areas in response to the 10 -Year Status Report, specifically, changes to the Economic Vitality Element (in light of dissolution of the Redevelopment Agency), SMART transportation agency effects on the City, Station Area planning, homelessness and affordable housing. These topics were addressed in staff's report to the City Council, and are further noted in the respective topic areas below. Additionally, several policies or programs had been identified for deletion in the 10 -Year status report due to the fact that ordinances had been adopted to implement these items. Planning Staff has revised its recommendation to maintain policies and programs that support implementing ordinances, as they are viewed as providing the foundation for the support of these regulations. The proposed changes to the General Plan 2020 Elements and Land Use Map are provided as Exhibits to the proposed Resolution approving amendments to the San Rafael General Plan 2020, (Attachment 2). The amendments can also be viewed on-line at htti)://www.citvofsanrafael.orq/commdev-r)lanninq- proi-gp10vrpt. The changes being recommended to each of the General Plan 2020, Elements and the City of San Rafael Land Use Map are discussed briefly as follows: Land Use Element: Amendments primarily consist of minor revisions to text in the Programs established to implement four of the Land Use Element policies, such as recognizing actions taken to implement programs or policies, or reflecting changes to timeframes as a result of action taken to implement the plan to date. The only material change to this Element is the addition of a "Water" land use designation to the land use table Exhibit 11, referenced in Policy LU -23. The Water designation applies to the open navigable waterways of the Bay and San Rafael Canal, and is consistent with the current Water (W) Zoning District that has applied to these lands for the past two decades. Land Use Map: The changes to the Land Use Map (which illustrates the distribution of land uses envisioned by Exhibit 11) are not substantive. The main reasons for the recommended revisions are to ensure consistency between the Zoning and General Plan, and to reflect current land use potential. The recommended amendments are as follows: • Adopting a formal Water designation for tidally influenced, open and navigable waterways (including the San Rafael Canal and excluding all other creeks) reflects the current land use limitations affecting these properties, and is consistent with long- standing zoning standards. SAN RAFAEL CITY COUNCIL AGENDA REPORT / Page: 4 • Revisions to apply suitable Public/Quasi-Public or Open Space land use designations for publicly -owned lands (SMART rights-of-way, and City and County properties) assure that the development potential and use of these properties is accurately depicted, and also matches existing zoning in most of these cases. • Corrections to several remnant parcels along Los Gamos Road to reflect their approval as open space buffers is appropriate. Likewise, a correction to the map is appropriate for a residentially developed property at 1920 Pt San Pedro Road which has been historically identified as Open Space, whereas it has been continuously developed and occupied as a residential property. Once these map amendments have been adopted, staff will initiate reprinting of the map to include these changes, along with other map revisions that have been adopted since 2004. Housing Element: The Housing Element was recently amended in 2015. However, during the 10 -year status report the City Council asked to include information regarding several topics. The amendments apply to four programs. These include a reference made to the Homeless Action Plan and the recent adoption of a Junior Second Unit program. At the 10 -year review Commission members had commented that there were too few policies or programs addressing homeless issues, and affordable housing. Some of this has been addressed in the 2015-2023 housing element, but also will be a topic that would be appropriate to consider addressing further in the planned update General Plan 2040. The text changes reference additional actions taken to implement the Housing Element. Staff has consulted with the State Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD) regarding these changes, and HCD concurs that these changes are insignificant in nature. Neighborhoods: Amendments apply to 25 programs to reflect various changes in land uses and development, and work that was called for and completed to implement policies and programs, update timeframes, etc. Specific accomplishments include encouraging more mixed-use housing development with changes to regulations such as the Neighborhood Commercial (NC) district, adoption of a Canalfront Conceptual Design Plan, and securing permanent access to Barbieri Park open space at Gold Hill grade. Communitv Design Element: Amendments apply primarily to updating timeframes, status or responsibility associated with 10 programs and are not materially significant changes. In particular, zoning amendments have been made to allow more reuse opportunities for historic buildings, and the Canalfront plan was completed. Economic Vitalitv Element: Amendments apply to 8 programs updating timeframes, status, or responsibility, with obsolete programs deleted. The Commission had questioned deletion of the Economic Vitality Element Program EV8b regarding Day Laborers. Staff noted that this program was a pilot -program that operated for two years, and was ended as of 2008. The sponsors of the program (Canal Alliance and Legal Aid of Marin) decided to discontinue the use after the pilot period ended. The program has not been on the City's work plan or the Council's list of goals for a number of years. Therefore, the program has been recommended for elimination. Elimination of a program from the General Plan does not preclude this use from being pursued if an application were filed for such an activity in the future. Circulation Element: Changes to this element include referencing the Station Area Plan, and the City's Complete Streets Directive. A more significant addition includes a new policy and SAN RAFAEL CITY COUNCIL AGENDA REPORT / Page: 5 program (C-5.1 and C 5.1 a) on anticipated change in the California State Law to use Vehicle Miles Travelled for CEQA environmental review; replacing the local Level of Service standard. Infrastructure Element: Changes to this element are minor, with deletion of Policy 1-12, encouraging working with sanitation districts to provide "cost effective services", which has been deemed unnecessary. No other material changes are proposed. Governance Element: Minor changes have been made primarily with respect to references made to other policies or programs, and to continue to encourage reducing governmental constraints to encourage a variety of housing options within the City. Sustainabilitv Element: A number of changes have been made to relocate policies and programs from the Conservation Element to the Sustainability Element. A number of policies and programs that were recommended in the 10 -year status report for deletion have been retained, because they support regulations which have been adopted to implement the City's long range sustainability goals. These include policies that continue ongoing support of regulations and efforts to encourage renewable energy use, local food production, waste reduction and social equity. Culture and Arts Element: A number of programs are proposed to be deleted which had a short term time -frame and have been completed, including completion of programs and plans for preservation and ongoing vitality of the Falkirk historic property (aka, Falkirk Cultural Center). Parks and Recreation Element: The three policies and programs scheduled for deletion have either been dropped or completed, consisting of the Marin History Museum program which has been dropped by the museum, and the pools and community gardens policies which were implemented. Residents now have access to San Rafael school pools and the Terra Linda Garden and Canal Community Garden opened in 2013. Safetv Element: Changes to this element are made to reflect the fact that the City Fire Department is no longer overseeing the hazardous waste sites in the City which has been delegated to County (CUPA) and other agencies. A new Program S-21 a was also added since the 10 -Year Review, to support monitoring of sea level rise issues. Noise Element: Program N -6b has been deleted as a land use policy has been implemented to encourage mixed use development. Elimination of this as a specific short term program would not be counter to serving the Policy N-6 calling for implementation of land use strategies to help reduce traffic noise. Open Space Element: No notable changes are proposed. Conservation Element: Several policies were moved to the Sustainability Element. Air and Water Qualitv Element: Regulations implemented by building codes and regional agency actions banning woodburning appliances have completed Program AW -4b. Staff notes that the one recommendation of the Planning Commission has been incorporated into the proposed Resolution approving amendments to the San Rafael General Plan 2020, (Attachment 2). The recommended change was made to Housing Policy H-1 5a to have both "Community Development and Parking Services" Departments listed as responsible for this program. This program's objective is to complete a Downtown Station Area Plan parking study and transit station relocation analysis be SAN RAFAEL CITY COUNCIL AGENDA REPORT / Page: 6 prepared and that following commencement of SMART rail operation, study other Station area plan recommendations to increase housing opportunities near transit and implement zoning code amendments where appropriate. The draft which the Planning Commission reviewed had proposed eliminating "Community Development" as the responsible City department and adding "Parking Services" as the responsible City Department. The Planning Commission recommended that both departments be listed as responsible le for implementation. This Planning Commission recommendation has been incorporated into the draft amendments presented to the Council ENVIRONMENTAL DETERMINATION: Pursuant to the California Environmental Act (CEQA) Guidelines, a General Plan Amendment action is subject to environmental review. The proposed components of the General Plan Amendment were carefully reviewed against the San Rafael General Plan 2020 certified Final Environmental Impact Report (FEIR), 2004. Based on this review and the completion of an Initial Study, staff has prepared an Addendum (No. 4) to the Plan EIR. The amendment components would not result in any new significant impacts or an increase in the severity of the impacts presented in the Plan EIR. The EIR Addendum was previously distributed to the City Council, is provided as an Exhibit to the proposed Resolution adopting Addendum No. 4 to the General Plan 2020 Final EIR (Attachment 1) and can also be viewed on-line at htt0://www.citvofsanrafael.ora/commdev-Dlannina-Droi-a010vrDt. COMMUNITY OUTREACH: Notice of the proposed General Plan Amendments has been provided in accordance with the City of San Rafael General Plan Amendment Procedures (CC Resolution 8379), Assembly Bill 52 (Tribal Consultation), San Rafael Municipal Code and State Law, as follows: ➢ In September 2015, the Planning Division notified the Graton Rancheria Tribal Heritage Preservation Office, all affected and interested utilities, agencies and local districts, nearby cities and the County of Marin, including; Sonoma Marin Transit, Las Gallinas Valley Sanitary District, Association of Bay Area Governments, Army Corp of Engineers, and State Department of Housing and Community Development. In addition, notices were mailed to all San Rafael homeowner's associations and the Federation of San Rafael Neighborhood and North San Rafael Coalition of Residents. ➢ In July 2016, the Planning Division mailed courtesy notices to all owners of private property located in the Bay and Canal waterways that would be included in the new "Water" land use designation. Courtesy notices were also mailed to the other private property owners that would be affected by land use map changes. ➢ On July 26, 2016 the Planning Division provided a presentation to the North San Rafael Coalition and Federation of San Rafael Neighborhoods. ➢ On or before August 5, 2016 a notice of the Planning Commission hearing on the General Plan Amendments GPA15-001 was published in the Marin IJ, and mailed to private property owners and all of the individuals, agencies and entities that had previously been sent notification letters and courtesy notices regarding the proposed text and map amendments. ➢ On November 19, 2016 a notice of the City Council hearing on the General Plan Amendments GPA15-001 was published in the Marin IJ, and mailed to private property owners and all of the individuals, agencies and entities that had previously been sent notification letters and courtesy notices regarding the proposed text and map amendments. SAN RAFAEL CITY COUNCIL AGENDA REPORT / Page: 7 Prior to the Planning Commission meeting, several property owners contacted staff in response to courtesy notices sent regarding the map amendments; specifically with regard to the new "Water" designation. Staff clarified that the purpose of the new designation was to be consistent with the existing zoning and land use limitations that currently apply to the subject properties. No significant issues or concerns have been raised to date. FISCAL IMPACT: Aside from the staff time associated with preparation of these amendments, there is no fiscal impact associated with this action. OPTIONS: The City Council has the following options to consider on this matter: 1. Adopt the two Resolutions as proposed, adopting the EIR Addendum No. 4 to the General Plan 2020 Final EIR and approving the General Plan Amendments; (staff recommendation); 2. Approve the two Resolutions with specific modifications, changes or additional conditions of approval. 3. Continue the applications and direct staff to address any of the Council's comments or concerns. 4. Reject the amendments and direct staff to return with a revised Resolution. ATTACHMENTS: 1. Resolution adopting Addendum No. 4 to the General Plan 2020 Final EIR, with exhibit (General Plan 2020, FEIR Addendum No. 4) 2. Resolution approving amendments to the San Rafael General Plan 2020, updating polices, programs and land use designations in response to the 10 -year review (GPA -001) with exhibits (Exhibit A and Exhibit B) a. Exhibit A — Text Amendments: httD://docs.citvofsanrafael.ora/CommDev/planning/GP2020Rer)ort/GPA15-001- TextAmendments.Ddf b. Exhibit B - Land Use Map Amendments: htte://docs.citvofsanrafael.ora/CommDev/Dlannina/GP2020Rer)ort/GPA15-001- LandUseMar)Amendments.edf RESOLUTION NO. 14241 RESOLUTION OF THE SAN RAFAEL CITY COUNCIL ADOPTING ADDENDUM NO.4 TO THE CERTIFIED SAN RAFAEL GENERAL PLAN 2020 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT (FEIR) (SCH# 2003052031) PREPARED FOR GENERAL PLAN AMENDMENTS (GPA15-001) (10 YEAR REVIEW POLICY AND MAP UPDATES) WHEREAS, on November 15, 2004, the San Rafael City Council adopted Resolution No. 11664, certifying the San Rafael General Plan 2020 Final Environmental Impact Report (General Plan 2020 FEIR). The General Plan 2020 FEIR is comprised of the following: 1. Draft EIR prepared by Nichols -Berman Environmental Consultants, February 2004; 2. San Rafael General Plan 2020 Background Report prepared by the City of San Rafael, April 2001 and updated August 2003; and 3. Response to Comments to Draft EIR prepared by Nichols -Berman Environmental Consultants, August 2004; and WHEREAS, the General Plan 2020 FEIR assessed the physical environmental impacts caused by implementation of the San Rafael General Plan 2020, and concludes that many of the significant environmental effects can be substantially lessened through adoption of feasible mitigation measures and that some of these effects would remain significant and unavoidable despite the adoption of all feasible mitigation measures; and WHEREAS, the certification of the General Plan 2020 FEIR was supported by the following findings: 1. The FEIR for the General Plan 2020 has been completed in compliance with CEQA; 2. The FEIR is legally sufficient, not only for approval of General Plan 2020, but for all subsequent actions such as Rezonings, Pre -zonings, Annexations and revisions to the San Rafael Municipal Code and regulations as necessary to implement the provisions of the General Plan 2020; and 3. The FEIR reflects the independent judgment of the City of San Rafael and the City Council of the City of San Rafael; and WHEREAS, subsequent to certifying the General Plan 2020 FEIR, on November 15, 2004, the San Rafael City Council adopted Resolution No. 11665 adopting the San Rafael General Plan 2020; and WHEREAS, the adoption of the San Rafael General Plan 2020 was supported by CEQA Findings of Fact and a Statement of Overriding Consideration (Appendix C to Resolution 11665) and approval of a Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program (MMRP, Appendix B to Resolution 11665); and WHEREAS, since 2004, the San Rafael General Plan 2020 has been amended several times, and in processing and adopting many of the subsequent amendments, the City has relied on use of the General Plan 2020 FEIR for environmental review and clearance; and WHEREAS, In 2009, the City prepared and adopted an Addendum to the General Plan 2020 FEIR (Addendum No. 1), which assessed a General Plan Amendment to change the Plan - adopted traffic level of service (LOS) standard at the intersection of 3rd and Union Streets; and WHEREAS, in 2011, the City prepared and adopted an Addendum to the General Plan 2020 FEIR (Addendum No. 2) which assessed a General Plan Amendment (GPA 11-001) which covered: 1) amending the Housing Element; 2) incorporating a new Sustainability Element; 3) amending wetlands conservation Policy CON -3; and 4) eliminating the City's Project Selection Process that allocated limited traffic capacity to new land development projects; and WHEREAS, in 2015, the City prepared and adopted an Addendum to the certified EIR (Addendum No. 3), which assessed a General Plan Amendment for the Housing Element (2015- 2023); and WHEREAS, in 2015, the City initiated the current General Plan Amendment (GPA 15- 001) in response to its 10 year review of the General Plan 2020, that includes minor revisions, corrections, and deletion of policies and programs in the General Plan 2020 deemed appropriate to keep the document current; and WHEREAS, the General Plan 2020 10 -Year Status Report can be found at: httD://docs.citvofsanrafael.orL_ /CommDev/Dlannin2_ /GP2020ReDort/San-Rafael-GP-Status- Report.ndf; and WHEREAS, as required by the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) Guidelines, General Plan Amendment GPA15-001 is defined as a `project' and subject to environmental review; and WHEREAS, given the components and scope of this project, which consists of updates to policies and programs in the General Plan 2020 to keep the document current as well as consistent with existing City land and zoning, it was determined that "tiering" from the General Plan 2020 FEIR is appropriate and consistent with the CEQA Guidelines Section 15152 in that: The components of the project and respective environmental topic areas are broadly covered and analyzed in the General Plan 2020 FEIR. While the addition of a Water land use designation is a new classification, the Water designation simply reflects existing regulatory limitations and constraints applicable to the affected properties, including those contained in the current zoning limitations. In a similar way, the addition of "Vehicle Miles Traveled" as a new method of evaluation for traffic impacts simply reflects anticipated changes in CEQA regulations and would not materially change development capacity or constraints. Finally, the updates to timeframes and responsibilities, inclusion of additional references to completed planning and policy documents, and deletion of completed policies and programs do not materially affect the General Plan 2020 long range planning document. The impacts from anticipated land use and development including anticipated growth, jobs, housing, infrastructure as well as program and policy changes called for in the General Plan are analyzed in detail in the General Plan 2020 FEIR, and the minor amendments proposed do not increase the impacts or create any new impacts not previously considered and addressed by the FEIR; and N 2. The project proposes a General Plan Amendment that is not specific to a particular development project. It addresses amendments to current policies and proposes new plan policies that are applicable to the entire San Rafael Planning Area. The level of detailed contained in this tier need not be greater than the program, plan or policy being analyzed; and WHEREAS, to further support "tiering" from the General Plan 2020 FEIR, an Initial Study has been prepared utilizing the most current CEQA Guidelines environmental checklist, and considering the following factors that constitute the "baseline" for review: None of the components of the project result in any changes to land use assumptions or projections currently presented in the San Rafael General Plan 2020 and analyzed in the General Plan 2020 FEIR. No changes are proposed to land use designations or their respective density and intensity parameters, nor are any changes proposed to adopted land use designations for individual sites/properties. Further, the project proposes no changes to circulation (transportation/traffic) projections, policies or implementing programs that would result in changes to level of service conditions at intersections or along arterials; 2. The proposed deletion of policies and programs that have been completed within each of the 16 General Plan 2020 Elements applies only to those policies and programs that no longer require any further monitoring or implementation. These items were assessed by the General Plan 2020 FOR and their completion has been anticipated. Likewise, changes to the timeframe for completion or assignment of responsibility would not materially alter the affected program or policy, and relocation of several Conservation Element policies and programs to the Sustainability Element would have no material effect on the document; 3. The proposed Circulation Element new Policy C-5.1 and Program C -5.1a for including Vehicle Miles Traveled as an additional method of evaluating traffic impacts would be consistent with planned changes to CEQA Guidelines and would not change how traffic impacts are calculated and modeled in the City. Rather, the amendment is intended to expand how traffic impacts are viewed regionally; and 4. The proposed Water land use designation would have no environmental impacts. The designation reflects existing regulatory limitations that already apply to these properties, and does not grant a land use entitlement to develop or build and is not subject to further environmental review under the CEQA Guidelines; and WHEREAS, in preparing the Initial Study, the project was reviewed against impacts identified and mitigation measures included in the certified General Plan 2020 FEIR (2004). The purpose of this review was to determine if the project would result in: new significant impacts; an increase in the severity of impacts; or new or expanded mitigation measures from those analyzed and determined in the General Plan EIR; and WHEREAS, the project and the findings of the Initial Study were assessed to determine whether an Addendum to the EIR, Supplemental EIR or Subsequent EIR would be appropriate to address environmental review for General Plan Amendment GPA15-001. Public Resources Code Section 21166 and CEQA Guidelines Section 15162 set forth limited situations in which a Supplemental EIR or Subsequent EIR is required once an FEIR has been certified. Further, 3 CEQA Guidelines Section 15164 provides for preparation of an Addendum EIR if no Supplemental EIR or Subsequent EIR is required; and WHEREAS, as demonstrated in the preparation of an Initial Study and comparing the project activities and actions against the impacts identified and mitigation measures included in the General Plan 2020 FEIR, none of the conditions analyzed under the General Plan 2020 FEIR have changed, nor does the proposed project meet the criteria for preparing a Subsequent EIR or Supplemental EIR. Further, the project will not result in one or more significant effects not discussed in the General Plan EIR, nor does the project create substantially more severe significant effects than previously examined in the General Plan EIR. Therefore, the Initial Study supports and recommends an Addendum versus the preparation of a Subsequent EIR or Supplemental EIR. Lastly, the project has been analyzed consistent with the provisions of State CEQA Guidelines Section 15183.5. As a result, an addendum to the certified General Plan 2020 FEIR (Addendum) was prepared; and WHEREAS, on July 8, 2016, Addendum No. 4 to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 FEIR, prepared for General Plan Amendment GPA 15-001, was published; and WHEREAS, on August 23, 2016, the Planning Commission conducted a duly noticed public hearing and reviewed and considered the Addendum No. 4 to the General Plan 2020 FEIR for General Plan Amendment (GPA15-001), along with the previously certified General Plan 2020 FEIR and all applicable mitigation measures therein; and WHEREAS, on August 23, 2016, the Planning Commission unanimously adopted Resolution No. 16-21, recommending to the City Council adoption of the Addendum No 4 to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 Final EIR; and WHEREAS, on December 5, 2016, the City Council held a duly noticed public hearing to consider Addendum No. 4 to the General Plan 2020 FEIR for General Plan Amendment (GPA15-001), and accepted and considered all oral and written public testimony and the written report of the Planning Division; and WHEREAS, the custodian of documents which constitute the record of proceedings upon which this decision is based, is the Community Development Department. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the City Council adopts the Addendum No. 4 to San Rafael General Plan 2020 FEIR for the General Plan Amendment (GPA15-001) based on the following findings, and hereby reaffirms the findings made by the City in adopting Resolution No. 11664 (listed above) certifying the General Plan 2020 FEIR: CEQA Section 21166 and its corresponding CEQA Guidelines Sections 15162 and 15163, provide that once an EIR has been prepared, no subsequent or supplemental EIR shall be required by the lead agency unless: (a) substantial changes are proposed in the project, requiring major revisions in the EIR due to the involvement of new significant environmental effects or a substantial increase in the severity of previously identified significant effects; (b) substantial changes arise in the circumstances of the project's undertaking, requiring major revisions in the EIR due to the involvement of new significant environmental effects or a substantial increase in the severity of previously identified significant effects; or (c) new information, which was not known and could not have been known at the time the EIR was certified, shows any of the following: 2 ➢ The project will have one or more significant effects not discussed in the previous EIR; ➢ Significant effects previously examined will be substantially more severe than shown in the previous EIR; ➢ Mitigation measures or alternatives previously found not to be feasible would in fact be feasible, and would substantially reduce one or more significant effects of the project, but the project proponents decline to adopt the mitigation measure or alternative; or ➢ Mitigation measures or alternatives which are considerably different from those analyzed in the previous EIR would substantially reduce one or more significant effects on the environment, but the project proponents decline the mitigation measure or alternative. 2. CEQA Guidelines Section 15164(a) provides that a lead agency shall prepare an Addendum to a previously certified General Plan 2020 FEIR if some changes or additions to the certified EIR are necessary but none of the conditions calling for the preparation of a supplemental EIR have occurred. Based on the analysis and documentation in Addendum No. 4 and the supportive Initial Study environmental checklist prepared for the proposed project, none of the situations described in CEQA Section 21166 and CEQA Guidelines Sections 15162 and 15163 apply here. Based on the results of the supportive Initial Study environmental checklist, the City has concluded that the proposed project would not result in new significant adverse impacts nor an increase in the severity of impacts identified and studied in the certified General Plan 2020 FEIR. None of the conditions requiring a supplemental or subsequent EIR exists and the Addendum has been prepared in compliance with CEQA. 3. The Addendum has been prepared in accordance with CEQA, the CEQA Guidelines, and the provisions of the City of San Rafael Environmental Assessment Procedures Manual. 4. The Addendum has been presented to the Planning Commission and City Council, who have reviewed and considered the information in the Addendum and the certified General Plan 2020 FEIR prior to approving the Project Approvals. The Addendum No. 4 and the certified General Plan 2020 FEIR reflect the City's independent judgment and analysis. I, ESTHER C. BEIRNE, Clerk of the City of San Rafael, hereby certify that the foregoing resolution was duly and regularly introduced and adopted at a regular meeting of the City Council of said City held on Monday, the 5th day of December, 2016, by the following vote, to wit: AYES: COUNCILMEMBERS: Bushey, Colin, Gamblin, McCullough & Mayor Phillips NOES: COUNCILMEMBERS: None ABSENT: COUNCILMEMBERS: None c � /:ZC-C ESTHER C. BEIRNE, City Clerk Exhibit - Addendum (No 4) to San Rafael General Plan 2020 Environmental Impact Report (SCH #2003052031) 5 ADDENDUM (No. 4) TO SAN RAFAEL GENERAL PLAN 2020 ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT (SCH#2003052031) FOR AMENDMENT TO San Rafael General Plan 2020 Proposing: General Plan Update (10 -year review) Project File No. GPA15-001 Prepared By: Metropolitan Planning Group 1303 Jefferson Street Ste. 100-B Napa, CA 94559 Lead Agency: City of San Rafael Community Development Department 1400 Fifth Avenue (P.O. Box 151560) San Rafael, CA 94915-1560 Contact: Paul A. Jensen, Community Development Director July 8, 2016 TABLE OF CONTENTS A. INTRODUCTION................................................................................................................ 3 B. BACKGROUND................................................................................................................. 3 C. PROJECT DESCRIPTION................................................................................................. 5 D. ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS.........................................................................................14 E. INITIAL STUDY CHECKLIST............................................................................................26 I. AESTHETICS.................................................................................................................28 II. AGRICULTURAL AND FORESTRY RESOURCES.........................................................29 III. AIR QUALITY..................................................................................................................30 IV. BIOLOGICAL RESOURCES...........................................................................................32 V. CULTURAL RESOURCES..............................................................................................34 VI. GEOLOGY AND SOILS..................................................................................................35 VII. GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS..................................................................................37 VIII. HAZARDS/HAZARDOUS MATERIALS...........................................................................38 IX. HYDROLOGY AND WATER QUALITY...........................................................................39 X. LAND USE AND PLANNING...........................................................................................42 XI. MINERAL RESOURCES.................................................................................................43 XII. NOISE............................................................................................................................43 XIII. POPULATION AND HOUSING: ...................................................................................... 45 XIV. PUBLIC SERVICES: ....................................................................................................... 46 XV. RECREATION................................................................................................................46 XVI. TRANSPORTATION AND CIRCULATION......................................................................47 XVII. UTILITIES AND SERVICE SYSTEMS.............................................................................49 XVIII.MANDATORY FINDINGS OF SIGNIFICANCE (CAL. PUB. RES. CODE §15065) ...............50 F. SOURCE REFERENCES..................................................................................................51 G. PUBLIC REVIEW..............................................................................................................52 Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 2 A. INTRODUCTION The City of San Rafael is amending the City's General Plan 2020 document to ensure that the policies and programs continue to be applicable and relevant to the vision of the General Plan. The targeted amendments focus on maintaining the established goals and policy directions of the existing General Plan while making adjustments that respond to changes in the ten years since the Plan was adopted. The majority of policies and programs would not require revisions, most notably those with long-term timeframes. Programs with short-term timeframes and those that have been affected by changing circumstances are updated through this General Plan Amendment. In keeping with the approach to maintain the framework established in the current General Plan, most changes consist of minor text and timeframe updates while new programs and revisions were integrated into the structure of General Plan. Pursuant to Section 15164 of the CEQA Guidelines, an Environmental Impact Report (EIR) Addendum is considered the appropriate document when "only minor technical changes or additions are necessary" and which would not affect or otherwise contribute to significant environmental effects. An Addendum is the most appropriate document pursuant to CEQA Guidelines because the General Plan Amendment does not introduce any new impacts or more severe impacts relative to what was previously analyzed and none of the conditions described in Section 15162 have occurred. This Addendum has been prepared in accordance with Section 15164 of the CEQA Guidelines and analyzes the potential impacts of the General Plan Amendment relative to those impacts previously identified in the San Rafael General Plan 2020 Environmental Impact Report (EIR) (SCH# 203052031), which was certified on November 15, 2004 through City Council Resolution No. 11664. While the General Plan Amendment does include minor changes such as those outlined below, it is consistent with what was identified in the EIR and would not result in any new significant environmental impacts or substantially increase the severity of previously identified significant impacts from those previously identified in the certified General Plan EIR. The General Plan Amendment has been reviewed against the impacts and mitigation measures presented in the certified General Plan EIR. As set forth below, this Addendum finds that there would be no change to the impacts evaluated for housing, population and growth, circulation/transportation, air quality, noise, biological resources, or other environmental categories. B. BACKGROUND On November 15, 2004, the City Council of the City of San Rafael adopted the San Rafael General Plan 2020 (General Plan). The General Plan has subsequently been amended with an update to the Housing Element, the introduction of a Sustainability Element, changes to various policies, and the redesignation of several land uses. The City of San Rafael prepared an Environmental Impact Report (EIR) to assess the physical environmental impacts of the General Plan, its policies and implementing programs (SCH Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 3 #2003052031) in accordance with the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) Guidelines. The Final EIR (FEIR) was certified by the City Council on November 15, 2004 (City Council Resolution No. 11664,). The certified EIR consists of the following volumes: ➢ San Rafael General Plan 2020 Background Report; April 12, 2001/reprinted December 19, 2003; ➢ San Rafael General Plan 2020 Draft Environmental Impact Report (DEIR); February 2004; and ➢ San Rafael General Plan 2020 FEIR/Response to Comments to the Draft Environmental Impact Report; August 2004 The certified EIR (including the DEIR, FEIR and subsequent amendments) assesses environmental impacts of the General Plan development projections through 2020 (cumulative). These impacts include, among others, transportation, air quality and noise. The certified EIR serves as a program -level environmental document for subsequent City actions that are deemed consistent with the General Plan. Further, the certified EIR was prepared and deemed legally sufficient to serve as a project -level environmental document for subsequent actions such as re -zonings, pre -zonings, annexations and revisions to the San Rafael Municipal Code and regulations, as deemed necessary or recommended to implement the provisions of the General Plan. As noted, since 2004 the San Rafael General Plan 2020 has been amended numerous times. In processing and adopting many of these subsequent amendments, the City has relied on use of the Plan's certified EIR for environmental review and clearance. In 2009, the City prepared and adopted an Addendum to the certified EIR (Addendum No. 1), which assessed a General Plan amendment to change the Plan -adopted traffic level of service (LOS) standard at the intersection of 3rd Street and Union Street. In 2011, the City prepared and adopted an Addendum to the certified EIR (Addendum No. 2), which assessed a General Plan Amendment for the Housing Element (2009-2014), a New Sustainability Element and Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Reduction Strategy, an amendment to Conservation Element Policy CON -3, as well as the elimination of the Project Selection Process (PSP). In 2015, the City prepared and adopted an Addendum to the certified EIR (Addendum No. 3), which assessed a General Plan Amendment for the Housing Element (2015-2023). The General Plan and EIR are available for review at the following location: City of San Rafael Community Development Department 1400 5th Avenue, 3rd floor, San Rafael, California 94915 The General Plan is also available on the City's website, which can be accessed at: http://www.citvofsanrafael.ora/Government/Community Development/General Plan 2020.htm Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 4 C. PROJECT DESCRIPTION The City of San Rafael has proposed the amendment of the General Plan 2020 (General Plan Amendment No. GPA15-001, initiated 1.13.2016) to update applicable policies and programs in each of the General Plan Elements. The goal is to bring the text and format of the General Plan up-to-date, to clarify policies and to remove inaccurate information. The amendments do not substantially change the established policy framework and direction. The General Plan Amendment does not propose development nor does it require construction of specific projects. The purpose of the General Plan Amendment is to reinforce local goals, policies, and programs to implement the vision of the community. Prior to the preparation of the General Plan Amendment, the City of San Rafael assembled a 10 -Year Status Report to review the progress of policy and program implementation of the General Plan, laying a roadmap to streamline and update applicable components of the General Plan. The 10 -year review was completed with input from members of a Working Group consisting of representatives from several city departments. A comprehensive review of short-term and annual programs was conducted for each of the 16 elements in the General Plan. Additionally, select long-term and ongoing programs were also included in the review. Through this 10 -year review, the City of San Rafael has evaluated which programs can be removed due to completion, what strategies and programs will need to be continued, and where revisions are needed to reflect changes over the past decade. Recommendations contained within the report provide guidance to update the policies and programs in the General Plan. A majority of policies and programs in the General Plan will not require changes and have not been listed in the table below. Rather, the table below provides a summary of the proposed changes to the General plan policies and programs. Where policies and programs require changes as shown in the table, most require minor text updates. Policies and programs that have been completed or are no longer applicable comprise a portion of the programs that need to be changed; the changes in these cases are the deletion of the policies and programs. Revised text and new programs have been included as needed to adequately address changes since the adoption of the 2004 General Plan. Overall, the General Plan Amendment does not propose significant change to the vision and direction of the current General Plan. The table below identifies the changes made in the General Plan Amendment. The actions of the General Plan Amendment are classified into five general categories: No Change/ Minor Update, Completed, Deleted, Revised, and New. • No Change/Minor Update - Many policies and programs will be carried forward into the Amended General Plan unchanged. The general success or lack of significant action during the planning period calls for many programs to be continued. Some programs require minor updates that do not cause any major change to the original text; this includes reference number updates, changes in responsible parties, or extending timeframes. Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 5 • Completed — Polices and programs that have been completed are proposed for deletion. • Deleted — Policies and programs that are no longer relevant are proposed for deletion. • Revised — Some policies and programs require a text update to respond to changes that have occurred since the adoption of the General Plan. Revisions may be required due to completion of planning documents, implementation of new projects, collection of updated information, and other changes. Policies and programs are characterized as revised if they have been moved to another Element or consolidated with programs in another Element. A number of programs in the Conservation Element were moved to and/or consolidated with programs in the Sustainability Element, which merged similar or redundant programs and relocated programs to Elements where they have a close logical association. • New — Policies and programs added through this General Plan Amendment are considered new. Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 6 Table of Changes to General Plan Policies and Programs Element Program/ Policy Land Use LU -8 LU -8b LU -20a LU -21 a LU -23c Exhibit 11 Housing H-11 b H-12 H -12a H-15 H-1 9a Neighborhood Intro NH -2a NH -3 NH -15a NH -16a NH -18a NH -21 NH -22 I ntro NH -34a NH -36 NH -36b NH -54a NH -74a NH -75 NH -75a NH -76a NH -86 NH -86a Modification No Change/ Minor Update. Crossed out page number reference, numbers were not necessary and may change so it avoids inconsistency. No Change/ Minor Update. Updated Housing Element program number reference. Revised. Update program and timeframe to maintain zoning standards adopted to implement the policy. Revised. Update program and timeframe to maintain zoning standards adopted to implement the policy. No Change/ Minor Update. Timeframe changed to long term. Revised. Water land use category added. Revised. Update program and timeframe to maintain zoning standards adopted to implement the policy. Revised. Reference Homeless Action Plan. Revised. Reference Homeless Action Plan. No Change/ Minor Update. Change Responsibility from Community Development to Parking Services No Change/ Minor Update. Specify sustainability program reference numbers. Deleted "current' from policy reference. No Change/ Minor Update. Updated Housing Element program number reference. No Change/ Minor Update. Updated Housing Element program number reference. No Change/ Minor Update. Updated resource. No Change/ Minor Update. Updated resource. No Change/ Minor Update. Updated responsibility/ resource. No Change/ Minor Update. Update program reference. No Change/ Minor Update. Updated Housing Element program number reference. Revised. Downtown District. Delete "which is now partially vacant' No Change/ Minor Update. Updated resource. No Change/ Minor Update. Acknowledge initiation of SMART rail service. Revised. Add SMART and Downtown Station Area Plan reference. Revised. Text revised to maintain zoning and revise Timeframe. Revised. Text revised to reflect completion of Canalfront Conceptual Design Plan. Added "Public Works" to responsibility and "State and Federal Grants" as resources Revised. Amend policy to implement adopted plan, revise Responsibility and Resources. Revise. Update program and Timeframe change to Ongoing. No Change/ Minor Update. Timeframe changed to long term. Revised. Added Civic Center station area plan reference. Revised. Added Civic Center station area plan reference. Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan NH-88 Revised. Delete "If rail service is initiated." NH-94b No Change/ Minor Update. Timeframe changed to long term. NH-95 Completed. Delete policy. NH-95a Completed. Delete program. NH-98 Revised. Add "maintain" to indicate continuing landscaping. NH-118a Revised. Add "Village at Loch Lomond project approval" reference. NH-118b Revised. Maintain program implementation. NH-118c Revised. Facilitate program implementation. NH-119 Revised. Maintain policy. NH-119a Completed. Delete program. NH-126a Revised. Encourage ongoing implementation of program. NH-150a Revised. Added accomplishments. Timeframe changed to long term. NH-156a No Change/ Minor Update. Timeframe changed to long term. Community CD-1 b Completed. Delete program. Design CD-3b No Change/ Minor Update. Timeframe changed to long term. CD-3c No Change/ Minor Update. Change reference to related program. CD-4a No Change/ Minor Update. Timeframe changed to long term. CD-4b Revised. Added partially implemented accomplishments. Timeframe changed to long term. CD-4c No Change/ Minor Update. Timeframe changed to long term. CD-4d No Change/ Minor Update. Timeframe changed to long term. CD-5a Revised. Acknowledge completed Canalfront Conceptual Design Plan. CD-8a No Change/ Minor Update. Redevelopment replaced with Economic Redevelopment as a resource. CD-10b No Change/ Minor Update. Timeframe changed to long term. CD-10c No Change/ Minor Update. Timeframe changed to long term. CD-11a No Change/ Minor Update. Timeframe changed to long term. CD-12a No Change/ Minor Update. Timeframe changed to long term. CD-13 No Change/ Minor Update. Updated Housing Element program number reference. CD-15b Revised. Mentioned thresholds adjusted. Updated Housing Element program number reference. Economic Intro Revised. Revised outdated numbers Vitality EV-2e Revised. Revised text, timeframe changed to ongoing. EV-7a Revised. Examples added, timeframe changed to ongoing. EV-8b Deleted. EV-12b No Change/ Minor Update. Updated Housing Element program number reference. EV-13a No Change/ Minor Update. Timeframe changed to ongoing. Updated Housing Element program number reference. EV-14 No Change/ Minor Update. H-54a reference removed (program completed) EV-15b No Change/ Minor Update. Timeframe changed to ongoing. EV-17a Revised. Expanded on pre-application actions. Timeframe changed to ongoing. Circulation Intro Revised. Revise "Background" and Update Exhibit 19 to add mode split with 2013 data. Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 9 Intro Revised. Revised "Transportation Successes" to reflect updates, add Station Area Plan references and Complete Streets Directive policy adoption. Intro Revised. Update to "Transit Services" and remove outdated text. Intro Revised. Update to "Paratransit Services" estimated needs. Intro Revised. Update to "Bicycling and Pedestrian Facilities" to reference Complete Streets Policy. Intro Revised. Update to "Paratransit Services" estimated needs. Intro No Change / Minor Update. Revise "Parking Facilities" sentence structure. Intro Revised. Update to "Funding Needs" to reflect new funding sources. Goal 12 Revised. Clarified reference to TAM C-1 a Revised. Clarified reference to TAM C -2a Completed. Delete program. (New) C-5.1 New. New policy on VMT for Environmental Review. (New) C-5.1 a New. New program on VMT for Environmental Review. Exhibit 21 Revised. Project list updated. C-7 Revised. Removed redevelopment as a source. Intro Revised. Removed outdated text from "Expanding Alternatives to the Single Occupant Automobile for Local and Regional Mobility". C-11 a Revised. Removed outdated text. C-1 le No Change/ Minor Update. Updated Housing Element program number reference. Intro Revised. Removed outdated text from "Improving Transit and Related Services". C -14a No Change/ Minor Update. Updated Housing Element program number reference. C-1 7a Revised. Updated SMART text reference. C-1 7b Revised. Updated SMART text reference. C-20 Revised. Updated SMART text reference. C -20a Revised. Updated SMART text reference. C -29e No Change/ Minor Update. Updated Housing Element program number reference. Infrastructure Intro Revised. Removed outdated text I -4b No Change/ Minor Update. Removed redevelopment as a source. I -8b Revised. Added text on continuing actions Intro Revised. Updated "Water and Wastewater Infrastructure" water supply text, and removed outdated text relevant to LGVSD 1-12 Deleted. Policy no longer considered necessary. 1-12a Deleted. 1-13 No Change/ Minor Update. Updated program number reference. Intro Revised. Revised "Telecommunications" introduction to remove outdated text. 1-15b Completed. Delete program. Governance G-2 No Change/ Minor Update. Updated Housing Element program number reference. G-3 No Change/ Minor Update. Updated Housing Element program number reference. Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 9 Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 10 Goal 21 Revised. Added text to highlight efforts to support community participation. G-5 Revised. Included reference to Community Engagement Action Plan. G-6 Revised. Included reference to Community Engagement Action Plan. G-7 Revised. Included reference to Community Engagement Action Plan. Update Housing Element program reference. G-8 Revised. Included reference to Community Engagement Action Plan. G -9b Revised. Text on exit interviews. G-11 a Revised. Replaced DART with CERT. G -12b Revised. Removed outdated text. Goal 22 Revised. Revised outdated numbers. G-1 8c Revised. Added reference to SB 2. Sustainability SU -3a No Change/ Minor Update. Timeframe changed to ongoing. SU -3b Completed. Delete program. SU -3c No Change/ Minor Update. Timeframe changed to ongoing. SU -4 Revised. Integrated with CON -8 SU -4a No Change/ Minor Update. Timeframe changed to ongoing. SU -4b No Change/ Minor Update. Program continues in some form but responsibility changed to city manager SU -4c No Change/ Minor Update. Timeframe changed to ongoing. SU -4d Revised. Revised due to completion. References recent actions. (New) SU -4e Revised. Moved from CON -17a. (New) SU -4f Revised. Moved from CON -18b. (New) SU -4g Revised. Moved from CON -18d Incentives for Solar and Clean Energy and combined with CON -19a Energy Production. SU -5a Deleted. (New) SU -5b Revised. Moved from CON -18c. SU -5b No Change/ Minor Update. Renumbered to SU -5c. Timeframe changed to ongoing. SU -5c Revised. Renumbered to SU -5d. Timeframe changed to ongoing. Integrated CON -20a. (New) SU -5e Revised. Moved from CON -20b SU -5d No Change/ Minor Update. Renumbered to SU -5f. Timeframe changed to ongoing. (New) SU -6 Revised. Moved from CON -22. (New) SU -6a Revised. Moved from CON -22a. SU -6 No Change/ Minor Update. Renumbered to SU -7 SU -6a to 6b No Change/ Minor Update. Renumbered to SU -7a and SU -7b. SU -6c Completed. Delete program. SU -6d No Change/ Minor Update. Renumbered to SU -7c. SU -7 No Change/ Minor Update. Renumbered to SU -8. SU -7a No Change/ Minor Update. Renumbered to SU -8a. Resource changed to Economic Development. SU -7b No Change/ Minor Update. Renumbered to SU -8b. SU -8 No Change/ Minor Update. Renumbered to SU -9. SU -8a No Change/ Minor Update. Renumbered to SU -9a. Removed Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 10 redevelopment as a resource. Updated Housing Element program SU -13a I No Change/ Minor Update. Renumbered to SU -14a. Incorporated Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 11 reference. SU -8c Revised. Moved and modified from PR -16a. SU -9 No Change/ Minor Update. Renumbered to SU -10. SU -9a Revised. Renumbered to SU -10a. Updated program status. SU -9b No Change/ Minor Update. Renumbered to SU -10b. Timeframe changed to ongoing. SU -9c No Change/ Minor Update. Renumbered to SU -10c. Timeframe changed to ongoing. SU -9d No Change/ Minor Update. Renumbered to SU -10d. (New) SU- Revised. Moved from CON -21 a. 10e (New) SU -1 Of Revised. Moved from CON -21 b. (New) SU- Revised. Moved from CON -21c. 10g (New) SU- Revised. Moved from CON -21d. 10h (new) SU -10i Revised. Moved from CON -21e. SU -9e No Change/ Minor Update. Renumbered to SU -10j. Timeframe changed to ongoing. SU -9f Completed. Delete program. SU -9g No Change/ Minor Update. No Change/ Minor Update. Renumbered to SU -10k. SU -9h Completed. Delete program. SU -9i Completed. Delete program. SU -10 No Change/ Minor Update. Renumbered to SU -11. SU -10a No Change/ Minor Update. Renumbered to SU -1 la. Timeframe changed to ongoing. SU -10b No Change/ Minor Update. Renumbered to SU -11 b. Timeframe changed to ongoing. SU -10c No Change/ Minor Update. Renumbered to SU -11c. Timeframe changed to ongoing. SU -10d No Change/ Minor Update. to SU -11d. Timeframe changed to ongoing. SU -10f No Change/ Minor Update. Renumbered to SU -1 le. SU -11 No Change/ Minor Update. Renumbered to SU -12. SU -11a No Change/ Minor Update. Renumbered to SU -12a. Resource changed to Economic Development. SU -11 b No Change/ Minor Update. Renumbered to SU -12b. Timeframe changed to ongoing. Incorporated CON -17b. SU -11c No Change/ Minor Update. Renumbered to SU -12c. Resource changed to Economic Development. SU -12 No Change/ Minor Update. Renumbered to SU -13. SU -12a to No Change/ Minor Update. Renumbered to SU -13a to SU -13c. SU -12c SU -12d Completed. Delete program. SU -12e Revised. Renumbered to SU -13d. Include reference to CCAP. SU -13 No Change/ Minor Update. Renumbered to SU -14. SU -13a I No Change/ Minor Update. Renumbered to SU -14a. Incorporated Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 11 Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 12 CON-23a. SU-13b No Change/ Minor Update. Renumbered to SU-14b. Incorporated CON-24c. SU-13c No Change/ Minor Update. Renumbered to SU-14c. SU-13d Completed. Delete program. SU-13e Completed. Delete program. SU-13f Revised. Renumbered to SU-14d. Incorporated CON-24d. SU-13g to No Change/ Minor Update. Renumbered to SU-14e to SU-14h. SU-13j (New) SU-14i Revised. Moved from CON-18f. LEED changed to CalGreen (New) SU-14j Revised. Moved from CON-24a. (New) SU- Revised. Moved from CON-24b. 14k (New) SU-141 Revised. Moved from CON-25a. SU-14 No Change/ Minor Update. Renumbered to SU-15. SU-14a to No Change/ Minor Update. Renumbered to SU-15a to SU-15d. SU-14d Culture and CA-1a Completed. Delete program. Arts CA-lb Completed. Delete program. CA-2 Revised. Revised text on the Arts Plan CA-6c Completed. Delete program. CA-8 Completed. Delete policy. CA-8a Completed. Delete program. CA-9a Completed. Delete program. CA-13a No Change/ Minor Update. Timeframe changed to long term. CA-14a No Change/ Minor Update. Timeframe changed to ongoing. CA-14c No Change/ Minor Update. Timeframe changed to ongoing. Parks and Intro Revised. Removed outdated text Recreation PR-7b Deleted. PR-11 a Completed. Delete program. PR-16a Deleted. Modified and moved to SU-8c. Originally recommended for deletion because of completion, but there may be opportunities to look into standards and permitting processes. PR-24a No Change/ Minor Update. Timeframe changed to ongoing. Safety Intro Revised. Updated to reflect CUPA oversight S-12 Revised. Updated to reflect CUPA oversight S-12a No Change/ Minor Update. Updated to reflect CUPA oversight S-12b No Change/ Minor Update. Updated to reflect CUPA oversight S-13a Revised. Updated to reflect CUPA oversight S-13b No Change/ Minor Update. Updated to reflect CUPA oversight S-13c No Change/ Minor Update. Updated to reflect CUPA oversight S-14a No Change/ Minor Update. Responsibility updated S-16a No Change/ Minor Update. Updated to reflect CUPA oversight S-21 Revised. Text updated, refers to sea level rise white paper S-21 a New. Changed to local hazard mitigation plan (New) S-21 b New. New program Intro Revised. Replaced DART with CERT S-26a No Change/ Minor Update. Replaced DART with CERT S-30b Revised. Updated WUI reference Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 12 No Change/ Minor Update. Replaced DART with CERT No Change/ Minor Update. Replaced DART with CERT Completed. Delete program. No Change/ Minor Update. Timeframe changed to ongoing. No Change/ Minor Update. Change to N -9b. Wrong numbering/ typo No Change/ Minor Update. Change to N -9c. Wrong numbering/ typo No Change/ Minor Update. Change to N -9d. Wrong numbering/ typo No Change/ Minor Update. Deleted reference that could not be located Deleted. Goal is deleted because policies and programs were moved to the Sustainability Element Revised. Policies and programs moved to the Sustainability Element. See SU -4e (Regional Energy Office), SU -4f (Zoning and Building Code Review), SU -4g (Clean Energy Production), SU -5b (Use of Alternative Building Materials), SU -5d (Water Efficiency Programs), SU -5e (Water Recycling), SU -6a (Site Design), SU -10e (Recycling), SU -1 Of (Recyclable Waste Receptacles), SU -10g (Recycling for Apartments and Nonresidential Buildings), SU -1 Oh (Demolition Waste), SU -10i (Recycling Education), SU -12b (Marin County Green business Program), SU -14a (Alternative Transportation Options), SU -14b (Alternative Fuel for City Fleet), SU -14d (City Electricity), SU -14i (Civic Buildings), SU -14j (Green Business Certification), SU -14k (Regional Collaboration), SU -141 (Backup Energy Provision) Completed. Program not moved to Sustainability Element Completed. Program not moved to Sustainability Element Completed. Delete program. No Change/ Minor Update. Deleted completed reference Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 13 S -33e S -40c Noise N -6b N -6f N -10b N -10c N -10d Open Space OS -2d Conservation Goal 32 CON -17 to CON -25 CON -18a CON -18e Air Quality AW -4b AW -6c No Change/ Minor Update. Replaced DART with CERT No Change/ Minor Update. Replaced DART with CERT Completed. Delete program. No Change/ Minor Update. Timeframe changed to ongoing. No Change/ Minor Update. Change to N -9b. Wrong numbering/ typo No Change/ Minor Update. Change to N -9c. Wrong numbering/ typo No Change/ Minor Update. Change to N -9d. Wrong numbering/ typo No Change/ Minor Update. Deleted reference that could not be located Deleted. Goal is deleted because policies and programs were moved to the Sustainability Element Revised. Policies and programs moved to the Sustainability Element. See SU -4e (Regional Energy Office), SU -4f (Zoning and Building Code Review), SU -4g (Clean Energy Production), SU -5b (Use of Alternative Building Materials), SU -5d (Water Efficiency Programs), SU -5e (Water Recycling), SU -6a (Site Design), SU -10e (Recycling), SU -1 Of (Recyclable Waste Receptacles), SU -10g (Recycling for Apartments and Nonresidential Buildings), SU -1 Oh (Demolition Waste), SU -10i (Recycling Education), SU -12b (Marin County Green business Program), SU -14a (Alternative Transportation Options), SU -14b (Alternative Fuel for City Fleet), SU -14d (City Electricity), SU -14i (Civic Buildings), SU -14j (Green Business Certification), SU -14k (Regional Collaboration), SU -141 (Backup Energy Provision) Completed. Program not moved to Sustainability Element Completed. Program not moved to Sustainability Element Completed. Delete program. No Change/ Minor Update. Deleted completed reference Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 13 D. ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS The required environmental review for the proposed General Plan Amendments commenced with a review of the 2004 certified San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR. An Initial Study checklist was prepared to determine if the proposed General Plan Amendments would result in any new significant impacts, an increase in the severity of impacts, or new or expanded mitigation measures from those analyzed in the General Plan EIR. The following section of this document provides the rational for the preparation an addendum and a summary of analysis and findings of the addendum for each environmental category reviewed. Rational for Preparation of EIR Addendum Since the General Plan EIR has been certified, the environmental impacts of all subsequent activities must be examined in light of the impact analysis in the certified EIR to determine if additional CEQA documentation must be prepared. One of the standards that apply is whether, under Public Resources Code Section 21166 and State CEQA Guidelines Sections 15162 and 15163, there are new significant effects, changes in circumstance or other information that require preparation of a subsequent EIR or supplemental EIR. CEQA Section 15164 states that, "the lead or responsible agency shall prepare an addendum to a previously certified EIR if some changes or additions are necessary but none of the conditions described in Section 15162 calling for a subsequent EIR have occurred." In determining whether an addendum is the appropriate document to analyze the modifications to the project and its approval, State CEQA Guidelines Section 15164 (Addendum to an EIR or Negative Declaration) states: (a) The lead agency or a responsible agency shall prepare an addendum to a previously certified EIR if some changes or additions are necessary but none of the conditions described in Section 15162 calling for preparation of a subsequent EIR have occurred. (b) An addendum to an adopted negative declaration may be prepared if only minor technical changes or additions are necessary or none of the conditions described in Section 15162 calling for the preparation of a subsequent EIR or negative declaration have occurred. (c) An addendum need not be circulated for public review but can be included in or attached to the final EIR or adopted negative declaration. (d) The decision-making body shall consider the addendum with the final EIR or adopted negative declaration prior to making a decision on the project. (e) A brief explanation of the decision not to prepare a subsequent EIR pursuant to Section 15162 should be included in an addendum to an EIR, the lead agency's required findings on the project, or elsewhere in the record. The explanation must be supported by substantial evidence. Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 14 New significant effects or other grounds require preparation of a subsequent EIR or supplemental EIR in support of further agency action on a project pursuant to Public Resources Code Section 21166 and State CEQA Guidelines Sections 15162 and 15163. Under these guidelines, a subsequent or supplemental EIR shall be prepared if any of the following criteria are met. (a) When an EIR has been certified or negative declaration adopted for a project, no subsequent EIR shall be prepared for that project unless the lead agency determines, on the basis of substantial evidence in the light of the whole record, one or more of the following: (1) Substantial changes are proposed in the project which will require major revisions of the previous EIR or negative declaration due to the involvement of new significant environmental effects or a substantial increase in the severity of previously identified significant effects; (2) Substantial changes occur with respect to the circumstances under which the project is undertaken which will require major revisions of the previous EIR or negative declaration due to the involvement of new significant environmental effects or a substantial increase in the severity of previously identified significant effects; or (3) New information of substantial importance, which was not known and could not have been known with the exercise of reasonable diligence at the time the previous EIR was certified as complete or the negative declaration was adopted, shows any of the following: (A) The project will have one or more significant effects not discussed in the previous EIR or negative declaration; (B) Significant effects previously examined will be substantially more severe than shown in the previous EIR; (C) Mitigation measures or alternatives previously found not to be feasible would in fact be feasible and would substantially reduce one or more significant effects of the project, but the project proponents decline to adopt the mitigation measure or alternative; or (D) Mitigation measures or alternatives which are considerably different from those analyzed in the previous EIR would substantially reduce one or more significant effects on the environment, but the project proponents decline to adopt the mitigation measure or alternative. This document serves as the Addendum to the Final Environmental Impact Report (FEIR) prepared for the City of San Rafael General Plan. The Addendum has been drafted pursuant to Section 15164 of CEQA and provides evidence demonstrating that the proposed General Plan Amendment is consistent with the certified General Plan EIR. As demonstrated herein, the proposed changes set forth in the General Plan Amendment do not meet the criteria for requiring preparation of a Subsequent or Supplemental EIR, CEQA Section 15162 and 15163 respectively. The General Plan Amendment will not result in one or more significant effects not previously discussed in the General Plan EIR, nor does the Amendment Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 15 create substantially more severe significant effects than previously examined. Additionally, none of the conditions analyzed under the certified General Plan EIR have substantially changed. The City of San Rafael, as the lead agency, supports and recommends an Addendum rather than the preparation of a Subsequent EIR or Supplemental EIR. Therefore, the General Plan Amendment may be approved as an activity covered within the scope of the 2004 certified General Plan EIR. The purpose of this review is to determine if the project would result in: new significant impacts; an increase in the severity of impacts; or new or expanded mitigation measures from those analyzed and determined in the General Plan EIR. The following presents those General Plan EIR impacts and mitigation measures that are pertinent to the project, and compares the proposed project activities to these impacts and measures. The discussion is organized by the chronological order of topic areas presented in the Initial Study: Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 16 Impacts Summary Table GENERAL PLAN EIR IMPACT GENERAL PLAN EIR RELATIONSHIP TO PROPOSED PROJECT ADOPTED MITIGATION (GENERAL PLAN AMENDMENT 2016) MEASURE AESTHETICS Impact IV. 7-4 Light and Glare Mitigation Measure IV.7- No change. The General Plan Amendment would result in no change 4: new projects proposing that would result in impacts different from those analyzed in the GP GP EIR determined that development parking lot improvements EIR. facilitated by GP could produce new to prepare lighting plan sources of light and glare. Considered that incorporate significant before mitigation/ Less than measures as set forth in significant after mitigation CD -19b "Lighting Plan" AIR QUALITY Impact IV.3-1. Consistency with Clean Air No mitigation required. No change. The General Plan Amendment would result in no change Plan. General Plan EIR determined that that would result in impacts different from those analyzed in the GP there would be a less -than -significant to EIR. Therefore, this action would have no impact on General Plan the Clean Air Plan. consistency with the Bay Area Air Plan. Impact IV.3-2. Consistency with Clean Air No mitigation required. No change. The proposed update to the General Plan Amendment Plan transportation control measures. would result in no changes to the adopted Sustainability Element and General Plan EIR determined that there GHG Emissions Reduction Strategy, which ensure consistency with the would be to be less -than -significant Bay Area Air Quality Management District (BAAQMD) CEQA Guidelines impacts to Clean Air transportation control for promoting transportation control measures. measures. Impact IV.3-3. Odor/toxics buffer zones. Mitigation Measure IV.3- No Change. The General Plan Amendment does not propose a change 3. Adopted Program AW- in development policy from those analyzed in the GP EIR that would The GP EIR determined that in the 2a (Sensitive Receptors) Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 17 absence of buffer zones from major mobile sources of toxic contaminants impacts would be potentially significant before mitigation. BIOLOGICAL RESOURCES Impact IV.8-1. Special -Status Plant and Animal Species. The GP EIR determined that the 2020 GP could directly and/or indirectly affect special status plants and animals before mitigation. Impact IV.8-2. Sensitive Natural Communities. The GP EIR determined that implementation of the 2020 GP may directly or indirectly impact undeveloped areas. required that all projects considered "sensitive receptors" (e.g., housing, schools, child care) proposed within 500 feet of the closest lane of US 101 or 1-580 be subject to review of health risks. Mitigation Measure IV.8-1 introduced CON -14a requiring survey of vacant lots prior to development approval and CON -14b requiring minimization of impacts to special status species where impacts found to be unavoidable. After mitigation Impacts are Less than significant Mitigation measure IV.8-2 requires the adoption of Conservation Policy CON -10a, which requires the protection of oak savanna and oak woodland habitat when assessing development in these areas. expose "sensitive receptors" to health risks at significant levels. No Change. The General Plan Amendment proposes no new changes to the analysis in the GP EIR. No new impacts are expected and all impacts would remain at levels below significant. No Change. The General Plan Amendment proposes no new changes to the analysis in the GP EIR. No new impacts are expected and all impacts would remain at levels below significant. Impact IV.8-3. Federally Protected No mitigation required. No change. The General Plan Amendment proposes no new changes Wetlands. The General Plan determined to the analysis in the GP EIR. No new impacts are expected. that there would be less -than -significant Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 18 impacts to protected wetlands, provided that Conservation Element policies and programs were included in the adoption of the Plan. GEOLOGY AND SOILS Impact IV.9-1 Seismic Ground Shaking. The GP EIR determined that new development would likely be subject to some level of seismic ground shaking and found this impact to be significant and unavoidable. Impact IV. 9-2 Seismic related ground failure. The GP EIR determined that exposure to adverse seismic effects would be a significant impact. Mitigation Measure IV. 9- 1: Required post - earthquake inspections of critical facilities. With mitigation, impacts would be less than significant. (applicable to both impact categories) No Change. The General Plan Amendment proposes no new changes to the analysis in the GP EIR. No new impacts are expected and all impacts would remain at levels below significant. Impact IV. 9-3 Land sliding. GP EIR found Mitigation Measure IV.9-3 There would be no change or increase in the severity of the significant that development consistent with 2020 GP requires that the City and unavoidable impact. The General Plan Amendment does not could expose people to effects of develop and adopt a City change the policies on land sliding and proposes no new changes to landslides and this would be a potentially landslide policy. With the analysis in the GP EIR. No new impacts are expected. significant impact. Impact IV.94 Subsidence. The GP EIR found that development consistent with 2020 GP could expose people to effects of subsidence and this would be a potentially significant impact. mitigation impacts would be less than significant. Mitigation Measures IV.9- 4 (a) and 4 (b) requires that the City amend policy S-21 Rise in Sea Level and that the City adopt a program for S-20 Levee Upgrading, respectively. The General Plan Amendment revises Policy S-21. Rise in Sea Level to expand upon the current policy through monitoring, sea level rise vulnerability assessments, and coordination for long-term adaptation. Program S-21 a. calls for the preparation of a local hazard mitigation plan and Program S-21 b. calls for a vulnerability assessment. Policy S- 20 remains unchanged. Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 19 Impact IV.9-5 Erosion IV. 9-7 Septic Suitability of Soils. The GP EIR Determined that the installation of septic systems on inadequate soils would be a potentially significant impact. Mitigation Measure IV.9- 5 requires that the City shall amend Policy NH -68 Shoreline Embankments With mitigation impacts were found to be less than significant. Mitigation Measure IV.9-7 requires the City adopt a GP Policy discouraging the use of septic systems in the planning area. If no other alternatives exist than a soil test is required. With mitigation impacts are less than significant. LAND USE, POPULATION, EMPLOYMENT AND HOUSING Impact IV.1-1. Conflict with applicable land No mitigation required use or other plans. The GP EIR determined that there would be less -than - significant impacts. No Change. The General Plan Amendment proposes no new changes to the analysis in the GP EIR. No new impacts are expected and all impacts would remain at levels below significant. No Change. The General Plan Amendment proposes no new changes to the analysis in the GP EIR. No new impacts are expected and all impacts would remain at levels below significant. The General Plan Amendment proposes introduction of a "Water" land use designation for parcels covered by the bay to more accurately reflect parcels that are not expected to develop because of their location in the water. As development would not be expected on parcels under water, the applied "Water" land use designation would not cause a significant change. No new impacts are expected. Impact IV.1-2. Incompatible land uses and No mitigation required. No change. The General Plan Amendment would not increase the changes to neighborhood character. The severity of this impact or result in a new impact. Programs have been Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 20 General Plan EIR determined that there would be less -than -significant impacts. carried through to completion: zoning updates have been completed in policies NH -54, NH -75, NH -95, and NH -119. Programs in policy NH -118 have been updated to reflect progress in planning and development. The Project would not result in incompatible land uses or a change in the character of a neighborhood. Impact IV.1-3. Growth and concentration No mitigation required. No change. The General Plan Amendment proposes no new changes to population. The General Plan EIR to the analysis in the GP EIR. No new impacts are expected and all determined that there would be less -than- impacts would remain at levels below significant. significant impacts. Impact IV.1-4. Employment growth rate. No mitigation required. No change. None of the components of the project would result in a The General Plan EIR determined that substantial increase in the employment projected under the San Rafael there would be less -than -significant General Plan 2020. impacts. Impact IV.1-5. Jobs -to -housing ratio. The No mitigation required General Plan EIR determined that there would be less -than -significant impacts. NOISE IV.4-2. Increased Rail Noise. Mitigation Measure IVA- 2. This measure requires that a detailed noise assessment be conducted to assess noise and vibration impacts associated with No change. None of the components of the project would result in a substantial change in the jobs -to -housing ratio that is projected under the San Rafael General Plan 2020. No Change. The General Plan Amendment proposes no new changes to the analysis in the GP EIR. No new impacts are expected and all impacts would remain at levels below significant. Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 21 the SMART rail service. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Impact IV.5-3 Release of Hazardous Mitigation Measure IV. 5 - Materials. GP EIR indicates that 3 requires that policy S - development consistent with the 2020 GP 13 be introduced could cause a release of hazardous requiring remediation and materials that would be a significant cleanup for any sites impact. having had past associated impacts are potentially contamination. Impact IV.54 Hazardous Materials, Mitigation Measure IV.5-4 substances or wastes near schools. The introduces GP policy S-11 GP EIR indicated that because the 2020 requiring survey of GP would allow for the transportation, existing industrial facilities storage, use and or disposal of hazardous located adjacent to materials within'/4 mile of a school the schools and restricting associated impacts are potentially the siting of hazardous significant. waste -related facilities near schools. PUBLIC SERVICES AND UTILITIES Impact IV.5-6 Police Services. The GP EIR found that development consistent with the 2020 GP would generate demand for police services beyond the available capacity. This was found to be a potentially significant impact. Mitigation Measure IV.5- 6(a) and (b) introduces S - 39a, Public Safety Facilities, to encourage the Police Dept. to identify needs and construct or renovate facilities. However, impacts remain significant Marin County CUPA replaces the San Rafael Fire Department as the oversight body for hazardous materials. Policy and program changes involve replacing text noting the responsible party for implementation. No Change. The General Plan Amendment proposes no new changes to the analysis in the GP EIR. No new impacts are expected beyond those previously analyzed. No change or increase in the severity of the significant and unavoidable impact. The General Plan Amendment proposes no new changes to the analysis in the GP EIR. No new impacts are expected beyond those previously analyzed. Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 22 Impact IV.5-8 Parks, The GP EIR determined that development consistent with the 2020 GP may further exacerbate the existing deficiency in park facilities and this would be a potentially significant impact. and unavoidable. Mitigation Measure IV.5-8 recognizes that impacts would be minimized through adherence to GP policies, however, impacts remain significant and unavoidable. Impact IV.5-9 Library Services. The GP Mitigation Measure IV.5-9 EIR found that development consistent recognizes that impacts with 2020 GP could increase the demand would be minimized for library services beyond the current through adherence to GP capacity which would be a potentially policies, however, significant impact. impacts remain significant and unavoidable. Impact IV.5-11 Wastewater treatment capacity — South of Puerto Suello Hill. The GP EIR found that development consistent with the 2020 GP could generate wastewater flows that exceed the capacity of the Central Marin Sanitation Agency. Mitigation Measure IV.5- 11(a) and (b) require that that the CMSA perform a Capacity Management Alternative Study. Impact.5-12 Water Supply. The GP EIR Mitigation Measure IV.5- found that development consistent with the 12(a) and (b) requires 2020 GP could increase the demand for that the MMWD research water in the planning area which would and implement water constitute a project specific and cumulative conservation facilities and impact. identify new water supply sources. However, this impact remains significant and unavoidable No change or increase in the severity of the significant and unavoidable impact. The General Plan Amendment proposes no new changes to the analysis in the GP EIR. No new impacts are expected beyond those previously analyzed. No change or increase in the severity of the significant and unavoidable impact. The General Plan Amendment proposes no new changes to the analysis in the GP EIR. No new impacts are expected beyond those previously analyzed. No change or increase in the severity of the significant and unavoidable impact. The General Plan Amendment proposes no new changes to the analysis in the GP EIR. No new impacts are expected beyond those previously analyzed. No change or increase in the severity of the significant and unavoidable impact. The General Plan Amendment proposes no new changes to the analysis in the GP EIR. No new impacts are expected beyond those previously analyzed. Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 23 TRANSPORTATION/TRAFFIC Impact IV.2-1. Level of Service at intersections approved to acceptable levels of service with General Plan 2020. The General Plan determined that there would be less -than -significant impacts to intersections adopted with specific, acceptable LOS standards. Impacts IV.2-2, IV.2-3, IV.2-4, IV.2-5. Impacts to levels of service at specific intersections. The GP EIR determined that there would be significant and unavoidable impacts at specific intersections. No mitigation required. The General Plan Amendment presents updates to the list of traffic improvements in terms of description, funding amount for consolidated projects, and timing of proposed roadway improvements. The total funding remains consistent with the current General Plan No new impacts are expected beyond those previously analyzed. No mitigation measures No change or increase in the severity of the significant and unavoidable available or adopted to impact. The General Plan Amendment proposes no new changes to the reduce impacts to analysis in the GP EIR. No new impacts are expected beyond those acceptable level. Found previously analyzed. to be significant and unavoidable Impact IV.2-6. Unacceptable City roadway Impact determined to be segment level of service resulting from San significant and Rafael General Plan 2020. The General unavoidable. No Plan EIR determined that there would be mitigation measures significant and unavoidable impacts along available or adopted to specific roadway segments. reduce impacts to acceptable level. Impact IV.2-7. City roadway segment level No mitigation required of service resulting from San Rafael General Plan 2020. The General Plan determined that there would be less -than -significant impacts to selective City roadway segments. Impact IV.2-9 LOS along US 101 and 1-580 GP EIR determined Mainlines resulting from 2020 GP. impact to be significant Implementation of the GP would cause and unavoidable. No No change or increase in the severity of the significant and unavoidable impact. The General Plan Amendment proposes no new changes to the analysis in the GP EIR. No new impacts are expected beyond those previously analyzed. No change. The General Plan Amendment proposes no new changes to the analysis in the GP EIR. No new impacts are expected beyond those previously analyzed. No change or increase in the severity of the significant and unavoidable impact. The General Plan Amendment proposes no new changes to the analysis in the GP EIR. No new impacts are expected beyond those Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 24 some freeway segments to deteriorate to mitigation measures below significant levels and this is available to further reduce considered a potentially significant impact this impact Impact IV. 2-13 Removal of on -street GP EIR determined parking spaces along Lincoln Avenue. The impact to be significant GP EIR determined that the removal of on- and unavoidable. No street parking spaces required to improve mitigation measures traffic flow would be a potentially significant available to further reduce impact. this impact previously analyzed. No change or increase in the severity of the significant and unavoidable impact. The General Plan Amendment proposes no new changes to the analysis in the GP EIR. No new impacts are expected beyond those previously analyzed. Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 25 E. INITIAL STUDY CHECKLIST 1. Project Title Initial Study Checklist General Plan Amendment 2. Lead Agency Name & Address City of San Rafael Community Development Department Planning Division 1400 Fifth Avenue (P.O. Box 151560) San Rafael, California 94915-1560 3. Contact Person & Phone Number Paul A. Jensen, Community Development Director Phone number: (415) 485-5064 Email: Paul.iensen(cDcitvofsanrafael.orq 4. Project Location The proposed project is not site-specific, but addresses policies, programs and strategies that are applicable citywide. 5. Project Sponsor's Name & Address Other Public Agencies Whose Approval Is Required City of San Rafael 1400 5th Avenue P.O. Box 151560 San Rafael, CA 94915-1560 None Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 26 ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS POTENTIALLY AFFECTED None of the following environmental categories would be potentially affected, as indicated by the following evaluation of environmental impacts. ❑ Aesthetics ❑ Agriculture Resources ❑ Air Quality ❑ Biological Resources ❑ Cultural Resources ❑ Geology /Soils ❑ Greenhouse Gas ❑ Hazards & Hazardous ❑ Hydrology / Water Quality ❑ Land Use / Planning ❑ Mineral Resources ❑ Noise ❑ Population / Housing ❑ Public Services ❑ Recreation ❑ Transportation / Traffic ❑ Utilities / Service Systems ❑ Mandatory Finding of Significance DETERMINATION On the basis of this initial evaluation: ❑ I find that the proposed project COULD NOT have a significant effect on the environment and a NEGATIVE DECLARATION will be prepared. ❑ I find that although the proposed project could have a significant effect on the environment, there will not be a significant effect in this case because revisions in the project have been made by or agreed to by the project proponent. A MITIGATED NEGATIVE DECLARATION will be prepared. ❑ I find that the proposed project MAY have a significant effect on the environment, and an ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT is required. ❑ I find that the proposed project MAY have a "potentially significant impact" or "potentially significant unless mitigated" impact on the environment, but at lest one effect 1) has been adequately analyzed in an earlier document pursuant to applicable legal standards, and 2) has been addressed by mitigation measures based on the earlier analysis as described on attached sheets. An ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT is required, but it must analyze only the effects that remain to be addressed. ® I find that, in preparing the attached Initial Study, the proposed project would not result in any new significant information, new significant impacts or new mitigation measures that had not been previously considered, analyzed or disclosed in the San Rafael General Plan 2020 certified EIR (ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT). Consistent with CEQA Guidelines Section 15164, an ADDENDUM to the certified ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT will be prepared. Prepared By: Olivia Ervin, Environmental Planner, Metropolitan Planning Group ( y 9,� 2 t) /�7 zae'l td",f Approved By: Paul A. Jensen, Community Development Director, City of San Rafael Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 27 EVALUATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS I. AESTHETICS c) Substantially degrade the existing visual character or quality of the site and its surroundings? ❑ ❑ ❑ d) Create a new source of substantial light or glare which would adversely affect day or nighttime views in ❑ ❑ ❑ the area? Sources: 1, 2, 3, and 7 Aesthetics Impact Discussion: a) No Impact. Adoption of the proposed General Plan Amendment will not have a substantial direct or indirect impact on scenic vistas. Any future development project will be subject to individual, site-specific environmental review, as required by CEQA as well as all development standards and building code regulations required by State law and City policy. b) No Impact. The General Plan Amendment provides policies and programs that are broadly applied citywide and are not site-specific. Potential environmental impacts to scenic resources may be realized or determined when the policies or programs are considered on a site-specific or project -specific basis. The General Plan contains several policies regarding the preservation of scenic roads and highways. The individual impacts of these types of activities will be assessed at the time of specific project review. No impacts beyond those identified in the General Plan EIR are anticipated. Thus, the General Plan Amendment will have no impacts to scenic resources. c) No Impact. Potential environmental impacts to the visual character or quality of a specific site and its surroundings may be realized or determined when the policies or programs are considered and applied on a site-specific or project -specific basis. The individual impacts of future development to the visual character and quality of the site will be assessed at the time of specific project review. Impacts from future growth and infill development associated with residential land uses have been previously identified in the General Plan EIR and would be required to be consistent with existing adopted General Plan policies that preserve the visual character and ensure compatibility. No impacts beyond those identified in the General Plan EIR are anticipated, and thus the General Plan Amendment would Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 28 Less Than Potentially Significant Less than Would the project: Significant with Significant No Impact Impact Mitigation Impact Incorporated a) Have a substantial adverse effect on a scenic vista? ❑ ❑ ❑ b) Substantially damage scenic resources, including, but not limited to, trees, rock outcroppings, and historic buildings within a state scenic highway? ❑ ❑ ❑ c) Substantially degrade the existing visual character or quality of the site and its surroundings? ❑ ❑ ❑ d) Create a new source of substantial light or glare which would adversely affect day or nighttime views in ❑ ❑ ❑ the area? Sources: 1, 2, 3, and 7 Aesthetics Impact Discussion: a) No Impact. Adoption of the proposed General Plan Amendment will not have a substantial direct or indirect impact on scenic vistas. Any future development project will be subject to individual, site-specific environmental review, as required by CEQA as well as all development standards and building code regulations required by State law and City policy. b) No Impact. The General Plan Amendment provides policies and programs that are broadly applied citywide and are not site-specific. Potential environmental impacts to scenic resources may be realized or determined when the policies or programs are considered on a site-specific or project -specific basis. The General Plan contains several policies regarding the preservation of scenic roads and highways. The individual impacts of these types of activities will be assessed at the time of specific project review. No impacts beyond those identified in the General Plan EIR are anticipated. Thus, the General Plan Amendment will have no impacts to scenic resources. c) No Impact. Potential environmental impacts to the visual character or quality of a specific site and its surroundings may be realized or determined when the policies or programs are considered and applied on a site-specific or project -specific basis. The individual impacts of future development to the visual character and quality of the site will be assessed at the time of specific project review. Impacts from future growth and infill development associated with residential land uses have been previously identified in the General Plan EIR and would be required to be consistent with existing adopted General Plan policies that preserve the visual character and ensure compatibility. No impacts beyond those identified in the General Plan EIR are anticipated, and thus the General Plan Amendment would Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 28 result in no impacts to the environment due to a degradation of the visual character and quality. d) No Impact. The General Plan Amendment provides policies and programs that are broadly applied citywide and are not site-specific. Potential environmental impacts associated with new sources of light or glare may be realized or determined when the policies or programs are considered on a site-specific or project -specific basis. The individual impacts of these types of activities will be assessed at the time of specific project review. No impacts beyond those identified in the General Plan EIR are anticipated, and thus the General Plan Amendment would result in no impacts to the environment due to introduction of light and glare. II. AGRICULTURAL AND FORESTRY RESOURCES c) Conflict with existing zoning for, or cause rezoning of, forest land (as defined in Public Resources Code section 12220(g)), timberland (as defined by Public ❑ ❑ ❑ Resources Code section 4526), or timberland zoned Timberland Production (as defined by Government Code section 51104(g))? d) Result in the loss of forest land or conversion of ❑ ❑ ❑ forest land to non -forest use? e) Involve other changes in the existing environment which, due to their location or nature, could result in ❑ ❑ ❑ conversion of Farmland, to non-agricultural use or conversion of forest land to non -forest use? Sources: 1, 2, 3, and 7 Aqricultural and Forestry Resources Impact Discussion: a) No Impact. The City of San Rafael does not contain any prime or unique farmland, nor does it contain any Farmland of Statewide importance. Adopting the General Plan Amendment will not result in impacts to farmland or agricultural uses located within the City limits. Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 29 Less Than Potentially Significant Less than Significant with Significant No Impact Would the project: Impact Mitigation Impact Incorporated a) Convert Prime Farmland, Unique Farmland, or Farmland of Statewide Importance (Farmland), as El El Elshown on the maps prepared pursuant to the Farmland Mapping and Monitoring Program of the California Resources Agency, to non-agricultural use? b) Conflict with existing zoning for agricultural use, or ❑ ❑ ❑ a Williamson Act contract? c) Conflict with existing zoning for, or cause rezoning of, forest land (as defined in Public Resources Code section 12220(g)), timberland (as defined by Public ❑ ❑ ❑ Resources Code section 4526), or timberland zoned Timberland Production (as defined by Government Code section 51104(g))? d) Result in the loss of forest land or conversion of ❑ ❑ ❑ forest land to non -forest use? e) Involve other changes in the existing environment which, due to their location or nature, could result in ❑ ❑ ❑ conversion of Farmland, to non-agricultural use or conversion of forest land to non -forest use? Sources: 1, 2, 3, and 7 Aqricultural and Forestry Resources Impact Discussion: a) No Impact. The City of San Rafael does not contain any prime or unique farmland, nor does it contain any Farmland of Statewide importance. Adopting the General Plan Amendment will not result in impacts to farmland or agricultural uses located within the City limits. Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 29 b) No Impact. The City of San Rafael planning area does not contain any land that is zoned for agricultural use or is under a Williamson Act contract. No impacts beyond those identified in the General Plan EIR are anticipated, and thus the Project will not have a significant effect on the environment. c) - e) No Impact. The City of San Rafael does not contain any land that is zoned for forest land or is protected under the Timberland Production zone. Impacts to agricultural resources from future growth have been previously identified in the General Plan EIR. No lands in the General Plan area designated for agriculture, forestry or timberland will be rezoned or otherwise affected by the proposed General Plan Amendment. Thus, the proposed Amendment will have no impact to such resources. III. AIR QUALITY Where available, the significance criteria established by the applicable air quality management or air pollution control district Potentially may be relied upon to make the following determinations. Would Significant the project: Impact a) Conflict with or obstruct implementation of the applicable air quality plan? b) Violate any air quality standard or contribute substantially to an existing or projected air quality violation? c) Result in a cumulatively considerable net increase of any criteria pollutant for which the project region is in non -attainment under an applicable federal or state ambient air quality standard (including releasing emissions which exceed quantitative thresholds for ozone precursors)? d) Exposure of sensitive receptors to substantial pollutant concentrations? e) Create objectionable odors affecting a substantial number of people? Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, and 7 Air Qualitv Impact Discussion: Less Than Significant Less than with Significant No Impact Mitigation Impact Incorporated ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ a) - c) No Impact. The Bay Area Air Quality Management District (BAAQMD) is the agency with regulatory authority for air quality in the Bay Area region, including the City of San Rafael. BAAQMD has adopted the Clean Air Plan (CAP), which aims to attain air quality standards, reduce exposure to pollutants, protect public health and reduce GHG emissions. The CAP identified 55 control measures that are presented in order to reduce air pollution throughout the Bay Area and includes measures such as promoting mixed-use transit -oriented and Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 30 compact development, dust management, water conservation, VMT reduction, energy efficiency and waste management, among others. The City's General Plan is considered to be consistent with the CAP since it supports the primary goals, includes control measures, and does not conflict with or disrupt implementation of control measures. Similarly, the proposed General Plan Amendment is also determined to be consistent with the CAP as there would not be a conflict with CAP implementation due to updates in proposed policies and programs set forth therein. The General Plan Amendment is broadly applied citywide and is not site-specific. The potential for conflict with Bay Area Air Plan may be realized or determined when the proposed policies or programs are considered and applied on a site-specific or project -specific basis. The individual impacts of these types of activities will be assessed at the time of specific project review. The proposed General Plan Amendment would not result in a potential for conflict with the adopted Clean Air Plan since the proposed policies and programs therein would not: • Change density parameters for General Plan land use designations. The new "Water" land use designation, applied to certain parcels characterized by their location in the bay, is associated with a density of zero (0) residential units per acre.; • Change residential land use projections that would result in new traffic generation or increased air pollutants from those levels projected under the currently adopted San Rafael General Plan 2020 or the Clean Air Plan. In addition, the City recently adopted a GHG Reduction Plan that incorporates the implementation measures of the City -adopted CCAP, which includes recommendations such as improving the pedestrian/bicycle infrastructure (NTPP), promoting transit -oriented development (TODs), supporting transit services, and SMART station planning, which would reduce vehicle miles traveled, resulting in decreased air pollutants. The subject General Plan Amendment does not conflict with implementation of the Reduction Plan or the CCAP. The potential to violate an air quality standard may be realized or determined when the proposed policies or programs are considered and applied on a site-specific or project - specific basis. The individual impacts of these types of activities will be assessed at the time of specific project review. No impacts beyond those identified in the General Plan EIR are anticipated. Thus, the Project will have no impact on the environment as a result of conflict with an adopted air quality plan and/or an individual or cumulative violation of applicable air quality standard. d) No Impact. The exposure of sensitive receptors would be realized or determined when the policies or programs are considered and applied on a site-specific or project -specific basis. The individual impacts of these types of activities will be assessed at the time of specific project review. Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 31 The General Plan Amendment does not change or increase housing development projections for the planning area that would further expose potential housing to substantial pollutant concentrations beyond what has previously been analyzed. Increased density proximate to high transit areas could be exposed to elevated pollutant concentrations; however, site-specific analysis will be conducted at the project level in order to assess exposure of sensitive receptors. Policies and programs provide for the protection of sensitive receptors and require site- specific analysis where concentrations may be elevated. As the plan areas are developed and more specifics on housing opportunities and recommendations are identified and formalized, a detailed assessment of exposure to pollutant concentrations will be prepared. At the time of environmental review, the technical studies will be required to address potential pollutant concentrations and health risk exposure. The proposed General Plan Amendment does not introduce any policies or programs that would conflict with adopted standards to protect sensitive populations to air quality pollutants. One program to implement an ordinance on fireplace and wood burning stoves has been completed and is therefore deleted. Therefore, the Amendment will have no impact under this criterion. e) No Impact. The creation of potential, objectionable odors may be realized or determined when the policies or programs are considered and applied on a site-specific or project - specific basis. The individual impacts of these types of activities will be assessed at the time of specific project review. Adopting the General Plan Amendments will not create objectionable odors affecting a substantial number of people. No new or increased impact as a result of the General Plan Amendments will occur beyond what is already anticipated in the General Plan EIR. Therefore, the Amendment to the General Plan will have no impact associated with odors. IV. BIOLOGICAL RESOURCES Potentially Less Than Less than No Would the project: Significant Significant Significant Impact Impact with Impact Mitigation Incorporated a) Have a substantial adverse effect, either directly or through habitat modifications, on any species identified as a candidate, sensitive, or special status species in ❑ ❑ ❑ local or regional plans, policies, or regulations, or by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (Formerly Fish and Game) or U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service? b) Have a substantial adverse effect on any riparian ❑ ❑ ❑ habitat or other sensitive natural community identified in local or regional plans, policies, and regulations or by Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 32 the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (formerly Fish and Game) or U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service? c) Have a substantial adverse effect on federally protected wetlands as defined by Section 404 of the ❑ ❑ ❑ Clean Water Act (including, but not limited to, marsh, vernal pool, coastal, etc.) through direct removal, filling, hydrological interruption, or other means? d) Interfere substantially with the movement of any native resident or migratory fish or wildlife species or ❑ ❑ ❑ with established native resident or migratory wildlife corridors, or impede the use of native wildlife nursery sites? e) Conflict with any local policies or ordinances ❑ ❑ ❑ protecting biological resources, such as a tree preservation policy or ordinance? f) Conflict with the provisions of an adopted Habitat Conservation Plan, Natural Community Conservation ❑ ❑ ❑ Plan, or other approved local, regional, or state habitat conservation plan? Sources: 1, 2, 3, and 7 Biological Resources Impact Discussion: a) No Impact. Adopting the General Plan Amendment will not have a substantial adverse effect, either directly or indirectly through habitat modifications, on any species identified as a threatened, endangered, candidate, sensitive, or special status. Potential environmental impacts to special -status, sensitive or candidate species protected by regional plans, policies or regulations of California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) or United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) may be realized or determined when the policies or programs are considered and applied on a site-specific or project -specific basis. The individual impacts of activities will be assessed at the time of specific project review. Therefore, the Amendment will have no impact to sensitive communities and their habitat. b) No Impact. The General Plan Amendment does not introduce any land use changes, zoning changes or policies that would conflict with the protection of sensitive natural communities including sensitive oak savannas and oak woodland communities. The goals and policies of the General Plan serve to protect wetlands, habitat for special -status species, native vegetation, wildlife habitat, and wildlife movement corridors. Additional biological and wetland assessments would be required as part of environmental review for future development. There are no changes to land use that would result from implementation of the proposed General Plan Amendment. There are no new or more severe impacts that would occur relative to what has previously been identified in the General Plan EIR. Therefore, the Amendment will have no impacts to sensitive communities. c) No Impact. The General Plan Amendment does not introduce any new impacts to biological resources beyond those identified in the General Plan EIR. Adopting the General Plan Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 33 Amendment will not have a substantial effect on any federally protected wetlands or other sensitive water bodies. The creation of the new "Water" land use designation in the General Plan classifies parcels that are covered by the bay and are not intended to be developed. The amended policies and programs are broadly applied citywide and are not site-specific. Site-specific analysis of wetlands will occur at the time that development proposals are submitted and will be reviewed in accordance with adopted policies and programs. d) No Impact. Potential environmental impacts to movement of corridors for wildlife may be realized or determined when the policies or programs are considered and applied on a site- specific or project -specific basis. The individual impacts of these types of activities will be assessed at the time of specific project review. Adopting the General Plan Amendment will not result in new or increased impacts beyond those already anticipated in the General Plan EIR. Depending on the attributes of each individual development proposal, future development will be subject to additional environmental review and compliance with all applicable policies related to wildlife species including movement and corridors. Therefore, implementation of the Amendment will have no impacts to migration or movement corridors. e) - f) No Impact. Potential conflicts with the Conservation Element policies and the zoning ordinance provisions and regulations may be realized or determined when the policies or programs are considered and applied on a site-specific basis. The individual impacts of these types of activities will be assessed at the time of specific project review. There are no adopted local, regional or state habitat protection plans that apply to the San Rafael planning area. Thus, the Amendment will have no impacts that conflict with an adopted policy, ordinance or Habitat Conservation Plan. V. CULTURAL RESOURCES b) Cause a substantial adverse change in the ❑ ❑ ❑ 11 significance of an archaeological resource pursuant to § 15064.5? c) Directly or indirectly destroy a unique El ❑ ❑ 11 paleontological resource or site or unique geologic feature? d) Disturb any human remains, including those ❑ ❑ ❑ 11 interred outside of formal cemeteries? Sources: 1, 2, 3, and 7 Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 34 Less Than Potentially Significant Less than No Would the project: Significant Impact with Mitigation Significant Impact Impact p Incorporated a) Cause a substantial adverse change in the ❑ ❑ ❑ significance of a historical resource as defined in § 15064.5? b) Cause a substantial adverse change in the ❑ ❑ ❑ 11 significance of an archaeological resource pursuant to § 15064.5? c) Directly or indirectly destroy a unique El ❑ ❑ 11 paleontological resource or site or unique geologic feature? d) Disturb any human remains, including those ❑ ❑ ❑ 11 interred outside of formal cemeteries? Sources: 1, 2, 3, and 7 Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 34 Cultural Resources Impact Discussion: a) - d) No Impact. Adopting the General Plan Amendments will not directly impact historic, archaeological, and paleontological resources at a site-specific or project specific basis. In compliance with State Senate Bill SB18 and State Senate Bill SB52, the City initiated Tribal Consultation with the Graton Rancheria, Tribal Heritage Preservation Office, by certified mailed letter (Notice to Initiate General Plan Amendment/Request for Tribal Consultation) which was sent on September 8, 2015. A request for tribal consultation was not received by the 90 day time period established for making such requests. Amendments reflect completion of policies and programs in the Culture and Arts Element, including completion of cultural programs in policy CA -1, community arts contributions in CA -6, and cultural facilities in CA -8 and CA -9, leading to deletion of programs. In reviewing these impacts on site specific projects, the City will continue to rely on review of the City - adopted Historical/Architectural Survey and CEQA Guidelines Section 15064.5 to determine the presence of historic resources. The City -adopted Archaeological Resource and Protection Procedures, including: a) a review of the City's Past Finder archaeological sensitivity maps and property priority ranking to determine proximity to potential resources; b) consultation with the Northwest Information Center and local Native American tribe representatives for direction on needed study; c) the preparation of an archaeological resource assessment when deemed necessary; and d) implementation of protective measures such as avoidance, capping or relocation of resources, will be utilized for review of impacts associated with future development proposal. Adopting the General Plan Amendment will not introduce any new programs or policies that would conflict with the protection and preservation of cultural resources. Therefore, the Amendment will have no impacts to cultural resources (including Tribal Cultural Resources). VI. GEOLOGY AND SOILS Less Than Potentially Significant Less than No Would the project: Significant with Significant Impact p 1 Impact Mitigation Impact Incorporated a) Expose people or structures to potential substantial adverse effects, including the risk of loss, injury, or death involving: Rupture of a known earthquake fault, as delineated on the most recent Alquist-Priolo ❑ ❑ ❑ 11 Earthquake Fault Zoning Map issued by the State Geologist for the area or based on Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 35 other substantial evidence of a known fault? Refer to Division of Mines and Geology Publication 42. ii. Strong Seismic ground shaking? ❑ ❑ ❑ iii. Seismic -related ground failure, including liquefaction? ❑ ❑ ❑ iv. Landslides? ❑ ❑ ❑ b) Result in substantial soil erosion or the loss of topsoil? ❑ ❑ ❑ c) Be located on a geologic unit or soil that is unstable, or that would become unstable as a result of the project, and potentially result in on or off-site ❑ ❑ ❑ landslide, lateral spreading, subsidence, liquefaction or collapse? d) Be located on expansive soil, as defined in Table 18-1-B of the Uniform Building Code (1994), creating ❑ ❑ ❑ substantial risks to life or property? e) Have soils incapable of adequately supporting the use of septic tanks or alternative waste water disposal systems where sewers are not available for ❑ ❑ ❑ the disposal of waste water? Sources: 1, 2, 3, and 7 Geoloqv and Soils Impact Discussion: a) No Impact. Adopting the General Plan Amendment will not expose people or structures to potential substantial adverse effects, including the risk of loss, injury or death involving rupture of a known earthquake fault, strong seismic ground shaking, or seismic -related ground failure, including liquefaction and landslides. The San Rafael planning area contains no earthquake faults delineated on the Alquist-Priolo Earthquake Fault Zoning Map. Impacts to persons and property associated with seismic activity resulting from full build -out of the General Plan were addressed in the General Plan EIR. Potential environmental impacts associated with seismic ground shaking, ground failure including liquefaction, landslides and other direct and secondary effect of seismic activity may be realized or determined when the policies or programs are considered and applied to a project or activity, on a site-specific or project -specific basis. Depending on the attributes of each individual development proposal, future development will be subject to additional environmental review and geotechnical evaluation. Conformance with standard Uniform Building Code Guidelines would also minimize potential impacts from seismic shaking. There are no new or more severe impacts introduced as a result of the General Plan Amendment relative to what has previously been analyzed. Therefore, the Amendment will have no impact. Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 36 b) No Impact. Adopting the General Plan Amendment will not result in substantial soil erosion or the loss of topsoil. Impacts to soils resulting from the anticipated growth and development of the City were addressed in the General Plan EIR. No new or increased impact will result beyond what is already anticipated and analyzed in the General Plan EIR. Future development will be subject to additional environmental review and compliance with all applicable policies related to erosion. Therefore, the General Plan Amendment will have no impacts due to soil erosion. c) - d) No Impact. Geologic impacts resulting from the anticipated growth and development of the City were addressed in the General Plan EIR. No new or increased impacts will result above what is already anticipated in the existing environmental documents. Future development will be subject to additional environmental review and compliance with all applicable policies related to landslides, lateral spreading, subsidence, liquefaction, collapse, expansive soils and other soil stability concerns. Therefore, adopting the General Plan Amendment will have no impact under this criterion. e) No Impact. The San Rafael planning area is served by the San Rafael Sanitation District and the Las Gallinas Valley Sanitary District, which provide domestic wastewater/sewer service to all properties. Alternative waste water disposal systems are not permitted within the urban service area. All future development will be required to connect to the existing wastewater system. The proposed update does not increase demands or necessitate additional capacity beyond what has already been anticipated. Therefore, there would be no impact due to use of alternative sewer systems, as none are permitted. VII. GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS b) Conflict with an applicable plan, policy or regulation adopted for the purpose of reducing the El El El Z emissions of greenhouse gases? Sources: 1, 2, 3. 4, and 7 Greenhouse Gas Emissions Impact Discussion: a) - b) No Impact. In 2009 the City of San Rafael adopted the Climate Change Action Plan 2009 (CCAP) in response to AB 32, the California Global Warming Solutions Act. The CCAP includes strategies for transportation, waste reduction, land use, energy conservation and sequestration. The City also adopted a "Sustainability Element" to the General Plan and developed a GHG Emissions Reduction Strategy. Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 37 Less Than Potentially Significant Less than No Would the project: p 1 Significant Impact with Mitigation Significant Impact Impact Incorporated a) Generate greenhouse gas emissions, either El El El Z directly or indirectly, that may have a significant impact on the environment? b) Conflict with an applicable plan, policy or regulation adopted for the purpose of reducing the El El El Z emissions of greenhouse gases? Sources: 1, 2, 3. 4, and 7 Greenhouse Gas Emissions Impact Discussion: a) - b) No Impact. In 2009 the City of San Rafael adopted the Climate Change Action Plan 2009 (CCAP) in response to AB 32, the California Global Warming Solutions Act. The CCAP includes strategies for transportation, waste reduction, land use, energy conservation and sequestration. The City also adopted a "Sustainability Element" to the General Plan and developed a GHG Emissions Reduction Strategy. Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 37 The General Plan Amendment does not conflict with implementation of the Sustainability Element nor does it interfere with implementation of the GHG Emissions Reduction Strategy. The Amendment proposes the merger of certain policies and programs between the Conservation and Sustainability Elements, ultimately leading to the deletion of duplicative programs in one Element so that they can be consolidated in the other Element; merged conservation programs include CON -17b. Green Business Program, CON -23a. City Carpool, CON -24c. City Vehicle Fleet, and CON -24d. Renewable Energy Sources in City Facilities. Other programs within Policies CON -17 to CON -25 are carried over to the Sustainability Element, unless they have already been completed. Any new GHG emissions may be realized or determined when the proposed policies or programs are considered and applied on a site-specific or project -specific basis. The individual impacts of these types of activities will be assessed at the time of specific project review by either: a) complying with the measures in the developed checklist; or b) through preparation of an individual GHG emissions assessment. The GHG Reduction Plan incorporates measures of the City -adopted CCAP, which includes recommendations such as improving the pedestrian/bicycle infrastructure (NTPP), promoting transit -oriented development (TODs), supporting transit services, and SMART station planning, which would increase the performance and safety of public transit, bicycle and pedestrian facilities. The General Plan Amendment is consistent with all established State and local GHG reduction strategies and does not facilitate development that would conflict with the applicable GHG Plan or policies. Therefore, the General Plan Amendment will have no impacts associated with Greenhouse Gas emissions. VIII. HAZARDS/HAZARDOUS MATERIALS b) Create a significant hazard to the public or the environment through reasonably foreseeable upset and accident conditions involving the release of ❑ ❑ ❑ 11 hazardous materials into the environment? c) Emit hazardous emissions or handle hazardous or acutely hazardous materials, substances, or waste within one-quarter mile of an existing or ❑ ❑ ❑ proposed school? d) Be located on a site that is included on a list of ❑ ❑ ❑ hazardous materials sites compiled pursuant to Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 38 Less Than Potentially Significant Less than Would the project: p 1 Significant with Significant No Impact Impact Mitigation Impact Incorporated a) Create a significant hazard to the public or the environment through the routine transport, use, or ❑ ❑ ❑ 11 disposal of hazardous materials? b) Create a significant hazard to the public or the environment through reasonably foreseeable upset and accident conditions involving the release of ❑ ❑ ❑ 11 hazardous materials into the environment? c) Emit hazardous emissions or handle hazardous or acutely hazardous materials, substances, or waste within one-quarter mile of an existing or ❑ ❑ ❑ proposed school? d) Be located on a site that is included on a list of ❑ ❑ ❑ hazardous materials sites compiled pursuant to Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 38 Government Code Section 65962.5 and, as a result, would create a significant hazard to the public or the environment? e) For a project located within an airport land use plan or, where such a plan has not been adopted, within two miles of a public airport of public use ❑ ❑ ❑ airport, would the project result in a safety hazard for people residing or working in the project area? f) For a project within the vicinity of a private airstrip, would the project result in a safety hazard ❑ ❑ ❑ for people residing or working in the project area? g) Impair implementation of or physically interfere with an adopted emergency response plan or ❑ ❑ ❑ emergency evacuation plan? h) Expose people or structures to a significant risk of loss, injury or death involving wildland fires, including where wildlands are adjacent to ❑ ❑ ❑ urbanized areas or where residences are intermixed with wildlands? Sources: 1, 2, 3, 5, 6 and 7 Hazards and Hazardous Materials Impact Discussion: a) - h) No Impact. The proposed General Plan Amendment would not result in new or increased severity in the significant hazard and human health impacts beyond what was addressed in the General Plan EIR. A revision of Policy S-21, Rise in Sea Level, identifies sea level rise as a hazard of local and regional concern requiring coordination. New programs S-21 a. Local Hazard mitigation Plan and S-21 b. Vulnerability Assessment - BayWAVE Program call for long-term mitigation planning and adaptation, highlighting efforts that are underway. Other changes include shifting the oversight body for hazardous materials from the San Rafael Fire Department to the Marin County Certified Unified Program Agency (CUPA), but policies and programs regarding hazardous materials review and management have not changed except to acknowledge CUPA as the responsible agency. No new or increased severity of significant hazard impacts would occur beyond what was addressed in the General Plan EIR. Therefore, the General Plan Amendment will have no impact to hazards and hazardous materials. IX. HYDROLOGY AND WATER QUALITY Would the project: Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 39 Less Than Potentially Significant Less than No Significant with Significant Impact Impact Mitigation Impact Incorporated ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 39 a) Violate any water quality standards or waste discharge requirements? b) Substantially deplete groundwater supplies or interfere substantially with groundwater recharge such that there would be a net deficit in aquifer volume or a lowering of the local groundwater table level (e.g., the ❑ ❑ ❑ production rate of pre-existing nearby wells would drop to a level which would not support existing land uses or planned uses for which permits have been granted)? c) Substantially alter the existing drainage pattern on the site or area, including through the alteration of the course of a stream or river, in a manner that would result ❑ ❑ ❑ in substantial erosion or siltation on- or off-site? d) Substantially alter the existing drainage pattern on the site or area, including through the alteration of the course of a stream or substantially increase the rate or ❑ ❑ ❑ amount of surface runoff in a manner, which would result in flooding on- or off-site? e) Create or contribute runoff water that would exceed the capacity of existing or planned stormwater drainage systems or provide substantial additional sources of ❑ ❑ ❑ polluted runoff? f) Otherwise substantially degrade water quality? ❑ ❑ ❑ g) Place housing within a 100 -year flood hazard area as mapped on a federal Flood Hazard Boundary or Flood ❑ ❑ ❑ Insurance Rate Map or other flood hazard delineation map? h) Place within a 100 -year flood hazard area structures ❑ ❑ ❑ that would impede or redirect flood flows? i) Expose people or structures to a significant risk of ❑ ❑ ❑ loss, injury or death involving flooding, including flooding as a result of the failure of a levee or dam? j) Inundation by seiche, tsunami, or mudflow? ❑ ❑ ❑ Sources: 1, 2, 3, and 7 Hvdroloqv and Water Qualitv Impact Discussion: a) and f) No Impact. The policies and programs are broadly applied citywide and are not site- specific. The updates do not change or revise current water quality standards. Further, potential environmental impacts from development and activities on a site that could violate water quality standards may be realized or determined when the policies or programs are considered and applied on a site-specific or project -specific basis. The General Plan EIR found that residential development will be located almost exclusively in urbanized areas, and that consistency with the 2020 General Plan, would ensure that no discernible effect on Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 40 water quality would occur. The General Plan Amendment does not introduce any new impacts or increase the severity of impacts to water quality beyond what was addressed in the General Plan EIR. The individual impacts of development will be assessed at the time of specific project review. Therefore, General Plan Amendment will have no impact to water quality. b) No Impact. The policies and programs would neither result in a conflict with groundwater recharge nor deplete groundwater reserves. Thus, there would be no new or more severe impacts to groundwater reserves relative to what was analyzed in the General Plan EIR. Therefore, the Amendment will have no impact. c) - d) No Impact. The policies and programs would neither result in a conflict with groundwater recharge nor deplete groundwater reserves. Potential environmental impacts from future development may be realized or determined when the policies or programs are considered and applied on a site-specific or project -specific basis. The individual impacts of these types of activities will be assessed at the time of specific project review. e) No Impact. Amendments to General Plan policies and programs will not directly create or contribute runoff water that would exceed the capacity of existing or planned storm water drainage systems or provide substantial additional sources of polluted runoff. Potential environmental impacts from development and activities will be reviewed and considered on a site-specific or project -specific basis. The individual impacts of these types of activities will be assessed at the time of specific project review. The General Plan Amendment does not result in any new or more severe impacts than what was previously analyzed in the General Plan EIR. g) - h) No Impact. Implementation of the General Plan Amendment will not involve the exposure of people or structures to an elevated flood hazard beyond what has previously been identified. The sites identified for potential residential development in the General Plan Amendment could be located within a 100 -year flood hazard area as mapped on a Federal Flood Hazard Boundary or Flood Insurance Rate Map or other flood hazard delineation map. The individual impacts of these types of activities will be assessed at the time of specific project review. The General Plan Amendment does not result in any new or more severe impact than what was previously analyzed in the General Plan. i) -j) No Impact. Potential environmental impacts associated with a seiche or tsunami to development and activities on a site along the San Rafael bay front or within a FEMA flood hazard zone may be realized or determined when the policies or programs are considered and applied on a site-specific or project -specific basis. Sea level rise and mitigation planning are being addressed in a revised Policy S-21. Rise in Sea Level and in new programs S-21 a. Local Hazard mitigation Plan and S-21 b. Vulnerability Assessment - BayWAVE Program. The General Plan Amendment does not result in any new or more severe impacts than what was previously analyzed in the General Plan. Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 41 X. LAND USE AND PLANNING Potentially Less Than Less than No Significant Significant Significant Impact Impact Would the project: with Mitigation Impact Incorporated ❑ ❑ ❑ a) Physically divide an established community? b) Conflict with any applicable land use plan, policy, or regulation of an agency with jurisdiction over the project (including, but not limited to the general ❑ ❑ ❑ plan, specific plan, local coastal program, or zoning ordinance) adopted for the purpose of avoiding or mitigating an environmental effect? c) Conflict with any applicable habitat conservation ❑ ❑ ❑ plan or natural community conservation plan? Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 Land Use and Planning Impact Discussion: a) - c) No Imaact. The General Plan Amendment does not introduce any new or amended policies and programs that would divide an established community. Changes in the Land Use Element are consistent with established policies on land use and neighborhood character. Zoning amendments have been completed in policies NH -54, NH -75, NH -95, and NH -119. Programs in policy NH -118 have been updated to reflect progress in planning and development. Additionally, policy updates acknowledge the completion of the Canalfront Conceptual Design Plan and Downtown Station Area Plan. The General Plan Amendment proposes introduction of a "Water" land use designation for parcels covered by the bay to more accurately reflect parcels that are not expected to develop because of their location in the water. As development would not be expected on parcels under water, the applied "Water" land use designation would not cause a significant change. The project is compatible to applicable land use plans, policies and regulations. Therefore, the General Plan Amendment will have no new impacts. Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 42 XI. MINERAL RESOURCES XII. NOISE Less Than Less Than Potentially Significant Less than No Significant Would the project: Impact with Mitigation Significant Impact Im act p with Mitigation Incorporated No Impact a) Result in the loss of availability of a known Incorporated mineral resource that would be of value to the ❑ ❑ ❑ region and the residents of the state? levels in excess of standards established in the ❑ ❑ b) Result in the loss of availability of a locally - local general plan or noise ordinance, or important mineral resource recovery site applicable standards of other agencies? delineated on a local general plan, specific plan or ❑ ❑ ❑ other land use plan? Sources: 1, 2, 3, and 7 excessive groundborne vibration or groundborne ❑ ❑ Mineral Resources Impact Discussion: noise levels? a) - b) No Impact. The General Plan does not change any mineral resource designations, operations or mineral resource goals or policies for the San Rafael Planning area. Thus, there would be no impact to mineral resources. noise levels in the project vicinity above levels ❑ XII. NOISE Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 43 Less Than Potentially Significant Less than Would the project result in: Significant Impact with Mitigation Significant Impact No Impact Incorporated a) Exposure of persons to or generation of noise levels in excess of standards established in the ❑ ❑ ❑ local general plan or noise ordinance, or applicable standards of other agencies? b) Exposure of persons to or generation of excessive groundborne vibration or groundborne ❑ ❑ ❑ noise levels? c) A substantial permanent increase in ambient noise levels in the project vicinity above levels ❑ ❑ ❑ 11 existing without the project? d) A substantial temporary or periodic increase in ambient noise levels in the project vicinity above ❑ ❑ ❑ levels existing without the project? e) For a project located within an airport land use plan or, where such a plan has not been adopted, ❑ ❑ ❑ 11 within two miles of a public airport or public use airport, would the project expose people residing Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 43 or working in the project area to excessive noise levels? f) For a project within the vicinity of a private airstrip, would the project expose people residing or working in the project area to excessive noise ❑ ❑ ❑ levels? Sources: 1, 2, 3, and 7 Noise Impact Discussion: a) - b) No Impact. There are no physical improvements proposed as part of the update to the General Plan Amendment. All future development projects would be subject to applicable City noise standards. General Plan Amendment will not result in exposure of persons to or generation of noise levels in excess of established standard. The project proposes no changes to the current City of San Rafael Noise Ordinance that would impact current noise standards or limits. Potential environmental impacts from development and activities on a site that could expose persons to excessive noise levels may be realized or determined when the policies or programs are considered and applied on a site-specific or project - specific basis. The individual impacts of these types of activities will be assessed at the time of specific project review. Therefore, the Amendment will have no impacts due to excessive noise or vibration. c) - d) No Impact. The General Plan Amendment will not result in a substantial permanent or temporary increase in ambient noise levels in the City above existing levels. Potential environmental impacts from future development and activities could be realized or determined when the policies or programs are considered and applied on a site-specific or project -specific basis. The individual impacts of these types of activities will be assessed at the time of specific project review. Impacts associated with temporary and permanent increase in ambient noise levels were addressed in the EIR for the General Plan. Therefore, the Amendment will have no impacts due to temporary and permanent increased in ambient noise. e) - f) Less than Significant Impact. The General Plan Amendment will not result in an increased exposure of people residing or working proximate to a public or private airport beyond what is considered in the General Plan. There are no public airports in the City of San Rafael and there is one private airport, the San Rafael Airport, which is located in the Smith Ranch area. The General Plan Amendment does not propose any changes to the airport that would expose area residents to excessive noise levels. The individual impacts of future projects proximate to the airport will be assessed at the time of review for any specific projects. Therefore, the Amendment will have no impacts associated with noise exposure proximate to airports. Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 44 XIII. POPULATION AND HOUSING: Sources: 1, 2, 3, and 7 Population and Housinq Impacts Discussion: a) No Impact. The General Plan Amendment will not induce substantial population growth in the area. No change have been proposed that would require reconsideration of population projections, housing need, and development densities that were analyzed in the General Plan EIR. The policy changes proposed do not provide for any additional housing, businesses or population growth beyond what was previously analyzed. The General Plan Amendment does not propose changes to the Housing Element beyond reference updates to program numbers and other documents and does not change the analysis prepared in Addendum No.3 to the San Rafael General Plan EIR (SCH#2003052031) for the Housing Element Update (2015-2023). Therefore, the Amendment will have no impacts to population or housing. b) - c) No Impact. The General Plan Amendment will not result in the displacement of housing units or people, necessitating the construction of replacement housing elsewhere. The proposed policies and programs of the General Plan Amendment are broadly applied citywide and are not site-specific. Potential environmental impacts from development and activities on a site that could result in the displacement of existing housing or the need to construct replacement housing may be realized or determined when the policies or programs are considered and applied on a site-specific or project -specific basis. The individual impacts of these types of activities will be assessed at the time of specific project review. Therefore, there would be no impact from the proposed update. Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 45 Less Than Potentially Significant Less than No Would the project: Significant Impact with Mitigation Significant Impact Impact p Incorporated a) Induce substantial growth in an area, either directly (for example, by proposing new homes ❑ ❑ ❑ and businesses) or indirectly (for example, through extension of roads or other infrastructure)? b) Displace substantial numbers of existing housing, necessitating the construction of ❑ ❑ ❑ replacement housing elsewhere? c) Displace substantial numbers of people, necessitating the construction of replacement ❑ ❑ ❑ housing elsewhere? Sources: 1, 2, 3, and 7 Population and Housinq Impacts Discussion: a) No Impact. The General Plan Amendment will not induce substantial population growth in the area. No change have been proposed that would require reconsideration of population projections, housing need, and development densities that were analyzed in the General Plan EIR. The policy changes proposed do not provide for any additional housing, businesses or population growth beyond what was previously analyzed. The General Plan Amendment does not propose changes to the Housing Element beyond reference updates to program numbers and other documents and does not change the analysis prepared in Addendum No.3 to the San Rafael General Plan EIR (SCH#2003052031) for the Housing Element Update (2015-2023). Therefore, the Amendment will have no impacts to population or housing. b) - c) No Impact. The General Plan Amendment will not result in the displacement of housing units or people, necessitating the construction of replacement housing elsewhere. The proposed policies and programs of the General Plan Amendment are broadly applied citywide and are not site-specific. Potential environmental impacts from development and activities on a site that could result in the displacement of existing housing or the need to construct replacement housing may be realized or determined when the policies or programs are considered and applied on a site-specific or project -specific basis. The individual impacts of these types of activities will be assessed at the time of specific project review. Therefore, there would be no impact from the proposed update. Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 45 XIV. PUBLIC SERVICES: Less Than Potentially Significant Less than No Would the Project: Significant with Significant Impact 1 Impact Mitigation Impact Incorporated Would the project result in substantial adverse physical impacts associated with the provision of new or physically altered governmental facilities, need for new or physically altered governmental facilities, the construction of which could cause significant environmental impacts, in order to maintain acceptable service ratios, response times or other performance objectives for any of the public services: a) Fire protection? ❑ ❑ ❑ Significant b) Police protection? ❑ ❑ ❑ Impact c) Schools? ❑ ❑ ❑ d) Parks? ❑ ❑ ❑ e) Other public facilities? ❑ ❑ ❑ Sources: 1, 2, 3, and 7 Public Services Impacts Discussion: a) - e) No Impact. The General Plan Amendment proposes changes in responsibility for hazardous materials oversight by adding the Marin County Certified Unified Program Agency (CUPA) in place of the San Rafael Fire Department in programs S -12a. Environmental Database, S -12b. Environmental History, S -13a. Potentially Hazardous Soils Map, S -13b. Hazardous Soils Cleanup, S -13c. Local Implementing Agency. CUPA is included as an additional responsible party for program S -16a. Safe Transport of Hazardous Material. No changes proposed would directly impact police protection. There are no changes proposed that would impact schools or result in the need for new school facilities. No parks or other public facilities would be impacted by the proposed General Plan Amendment. There are no new impacts to public services beyond what has been previously analyzed. Thus, the General Plan Amendment will have no impacts to fire and police protection, schools, parks and other facilities. XV. RECREATION Less Than Potentially Significant Less than Significant Would the project: with Significant No Impact Impact Mitigation Impact Incorporated ❑ ❑ ❑ 11 Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 46 a) Would the project increase the use of existing neighborhood and regional parks or other recreational facilities such that substantial physical deterioration of the facility would occur or be accelerated? b) Does the project include recreational facilities or require the construction or expansion of recreational facilities which might have an adverse ❑ ❑ ❑ physical effect on the environment? Sources: 1, 2, 3, 5 and 7 Recreation Impacts Discussion: a) - b) No Impact. The General Plan Amendment will not impact regional parks or recreational facilities. No changes are proposed to that would alter recreational amenities citywide. As no specific project or improvement is currently proposed, a site-specific impact cannot be analyzed. The individual impacts to parks and recreation will be assessed at the time of specific project review. There are no new impacts to public services beyond what has been previously analyzed. Thus, the General Plan Amendment will have no impact on parkland and recreational facilities. XVI. TRANSPORTATION AND CIRCULATION Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 47 Less Than Potentially Significant Less than No Would the project: Significant with Significant Impact Impact Mitigation Impact p Incorporated a) Conflict with an applicable plan, ordinance or policy establishing measures of effectiveness for the performance of the circulation system, taking into account all modes of transportation including mass ❑ ❑ ® ❑ transit and non -motorized travel and relevant components of the circulation system, including but not limited to intersections, streets, highways and freeways, pedestrian and bicycle paths, and mass transit? b) Conflict with an applicable congestion management program, including, but not limited to level of service standards and travel demand measures, or other ❑ ❑ ❑ 11 standards established by the county congestion management agency for designated roads or highways? c) Result in a change in air traffic patterns, including either an increase in traffic levels or a change in location ❑ ❑ ❑ 11 that results in substantial safety risks? d) Substantially increase hazards due to a design feature (e.g., sharp curves or dangerous intersections) ❑ ❑ ❑ or incompatible uses (e.g., farm equipment)? Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 47 e) Result in inadequate emergency access? ❑ ❑ ❑ f) Conflict with adopted policies, plans, or programs regarding public transit, bicycle, or pedestrian facilities, or otherwise decrease the performance or safety of such ❑ ❑ ❑ facilities? Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 Transportation and Circulation Impacts Discussion: a) - b) Less than Significant Impact. Updates to programs were required due to progress made in transportation funding, transit service implementation, and in response to Senate Bill 743 which introduces a vehicle miles traveled (VMT) methodology for analyzing impacts to traffic, as opposed to the traditional level of service approach. Program C -2a. Local Transportation Tax, which promoted local transportation improvements and passage of a county transportation tax, was completed with the passage of Measure A; as such this program was deleted. The revisions to programs C -17a. SMART and C -17b. SMART Right -of -Way reflect progress made towards implementation of the SMART commuter rail service in Sonoma and Marin Counties. Amendments to these programs reflect the forthcoming commuter rail service along the SMART corridor and the maintenance of the right-of-way for this service. There are no modifications proposed that would result in a conflict with adopted plans. Policy C-5.1 and Program C-5.1 a introduces the Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT) concept as an alternative to Level of Service (LOS) that may be used in the future once a VMT model is created and approved. The program calls for the development and adoption of a VMT model and for the model to be incorporated into the General Plan EIR. Once developed, and prior to implementation, the VMT model will be evaluated separately to identify any environmental impacts. The introduction of this new policy is in accordance with State Law SB 743 and does not grant the authority to apply a VMT metric. Inclusion of the new policy regarding development of a VMT model does not introduce any new impacts nor does it establish new thresholds of significance. There are no changes proposed as part of the update that would result in elevated traffic trip generation beyond what was previously analyzed in the adopted General Plan EIR. There are no physical improvements proposed as part of the General Plan Amendment. The traffic impacts of any future development will be addressed in separate site-specific studies. The General Plan Amendment does not introduce any new or more severe impacts relative to what was previously analyzed in the General Plan EIR. Future analysis will be performed on the VMT model. Therefore, implementation of the General Plan Amendment updated would have less than significant impact to transportation and circulation. Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 48 c) No Impact. There are no changes to land uses that would affect air traffic patterns or introduce a safety risk. Therefore, the Amendment will have no impacts on air traffic patterns. d) - e) No Impact. No amendments are proposed to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 Circulation Element that substantially increase hazards or result in inadequate emergency access. There are no physical changes proposed as part of the General Plan Amendment. Potential impacts of any future development will be reviewed at the project level when specific site details are defined. Therefore, the Amendment will have no impacts associated with design hazards or emergency vehicle access. f) No Impact. There are no changes proposed that would conflict with the San Rafael Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan. Potential impacts of any future development will be reviewed at the project level when specific site details are defined. The General Plan Amendment does not introduce any new or more severe impacts relative to what was previously analyzed in the General Plan EIR. Therefore, the Amendment will have no impact due to a conflict with the Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan. XVII.UTILITIES AND SERVICE SYSTEMS d) Have sufficient water supplies available to serve ❑ ❑ ❑ the project from existing entitlements and resources, or are new or expanded entitlements needed? e) Result in a determination by the wastewater treatment provider which serves or may serve the ❑ ❑ ❑ project that it has adequate capacity to serve the project's projected demand in addition to the provider's existing commitments? f) Be served by a landfill with sufficient permitted ❑ ❑ ❑ 11 capacity to accommodate the project's solid waste disposal needs? Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 49 Less Than Potentially Significant Less than No Would the project: Significant Impact with Mitigation Significant Impact Im act p Incorporated a) Exceed wastewater treatment requirements of the ❑ ❑ ❑ applicable Regional Water Quality Control Board? b) Require or result in the construction of new water or wastewater treatment facilities or expansion of ❑ ❑ ❑ existing facilities, the construction of which could cause significant environmental effects? c) Require or result in the construction of new storm water drainage facilities or expansion of existing ❑ ❑ ❑ 11 facilities, the construction of which could cause significant environmental effects? d) Have sufficient water supplies available to serve ❑ ❑ ❑ the project from existing entitlements and resources, or are new or expanded entitlements needed? e) Result in a determination by the wastewater treatment provider which serves or may serve the ❑ ❑ ❑ project that it has adequate capacity to serve the project's projected demand in addition to the provider's existing commitments? f) Be served by a landfill with sufficient permitted ❑ ❑ ❑ 11 capacity to accommodate the project's solid waste disposal needs? Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 49 g) Comply with federal, state, and local statutes and regulations related to solid waste? ❑ ❑ ❑ Sources: 1, 2, 3, and 7 Utilities and Service Systems Impacts Discussion: a) No Impact. There are no activities proposed as part of the General Plan Amendment that would exceed wastewater requirements. The General Plan Amendment does not introduce any new or more severe impacts to water quality relative to what was previously analyzed in the General Plan EIR. Therefore, implementation of the General Plan Amendment will have no impacts to wastewater treatment. b) No Impact. There are no changes to land uses that would alter the water or wastewater demands evaluated in the General Plan EIR. No expansion of capacity or new facilities would result from implementing the General Plan Amendment. Therefore, the Amendment will have no impacts to water and wastewater capacity. c) No Impact. The General Plan Amendment will not result in any physical improvements necessitating the construction or expansion of stormwater drainage facilities. There are no new impacts or more severe impacts due to stormwater relative to what was analyzed under the General Plan EIR. Therefore, the Amendment will have no impact. d) - e)No Impact. There are no changes to the General Plan that would alter water supply resources or require additional wastewater treatment capacity. The General Plan EIR evaluated water supply demand and wastewater treatment capacity and there are no new or more severe impacts relative to what was analyzed therein. Therefore there are no impacts to water supplies and waste treatment capacity. f) - g) No Impact. General Plan Amendment will not generate solid waste or conflict with solid waste disposal regulation as no physical development will occur. The Amendment does not increase demand for solid waste or landfill disposal beyond what has previously been identified. Therefore, the Amendment will have no impacts due to solid waste disposal. XVIII. MANDATORY FINDINGS OF SIGNIFICANCE (CAL. PUB. RES. CODE §15065) A focused or full environmental impact report for a project may be required where the project has a significant effect on the environment in any of the following conditions: Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 50 Less Than Potentially Significant Less than No Significant with Significant Impact Would the project: Impact Mitigation Impact Incorporated a) Does the project have the potential to degrade the ❑ ❑ ❑ 11 quality of the environment, substantially reduce the habitat of a fish or wildlife species, cause a fish or wildlife Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 50 population to drop below self-sustaining levels, threaten to eliminate a plant or animal community, reduce the number or restrict the range of a rare or endangered plant or animal or eliminate important examples of the major periods of California history or prehistory? b) Does the project have impacts that are individually limited, but cumulatively considerable? ("Cumulatively considerable" means that the incremental effects of a ❑ ❑ ❑ project are considerable when viewed in connection with the effects of past projects, the effects of other current projects, and the effects of probable future projects)? c) Does the project have environmental effects, which will El El Elcause substantial adverse effects on human beings, either directly or indirectly? Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 (a) No Impact. The General Plan Amendment does not alter policies and programs in a manner that would degrade the quality of the environment, reduce habitat, or affect cultural resources. Therefore, the Amendment will have no impacts due to degradation of the environment. (b) No Impact. The General Plan Amendment is consistent with the City's General Plan land use designations and does not result in any changes to land use or zoning that would affect cumulative conditions. The General Plan EIR previously analyzed potential environmental impacts from buildout of the General Plan and no new or more severe cumulative impacts would result from the proposed Amendments. Therefore, the General Plan Amendment will have no cumulative impacts. (c) No Impact. The General Plan EIR identified policies, program and mitigation measure to ensure that implementation would not result in adverse impacts to humans or the environment. The General Plan Amendment does not propose changes to policies and programs that would significantly change the analysis performed in the General Plan EIR. Therefore, the General Plan Amendment will have no impacts due to substantial adverse environmental effects. F. SOURCE REFERENCES 1. City of San Rafael General Plan 2020, adopted November 15, 2004; as amended through December 2015. 2. San Rafael General Plan 2020, Environmental Impact Report, prepared by Nichols Berman Environmental Planning, August 2004; and as amended through December 2015. 3. City of San Rafael Municipal Code. a. Title 14: Zoning, adopted September 1994, as amended May 1996 b. Title 8, Chapter 8.13: Noise, adopted 2002 c. Title 15: Subdivisions, adopted 2002, as amended 2009 4. San Rafael Climate Change Action Plan, adopted 2009; Implementation Program Update May 2011. Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 51 5. City of San Rafael Bicycle/Pedestrian Master Plan, 2011 Update; adopted 2011 6. FHA's Non -Motorized Transportation Pilot Program (NTPP); 2009 7. Draft San Rafael General Plan 10 -Year Status Report prepared by Metropolitan Planning Group, January 2016 8. Draft Amendments to the City of San Rafael General Plan 2020. January 2016 G. PUBLIC REVIEW Pursuant to the CEQA Guidelines [§15164(c)], this addendum to the 2020 General Plan EIR does not need to be circulated for public review, and shall be included in, or attached to, the certified and amended General Plan EIR. Prepared By: Metropolitan Planning Group Reviewed By: Paul A. Jensen Addendum (No. 4) to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 EIR for Amendments to the General Plan 52 RESOLUTION NO. 14242 RESOLUTION OF THE SAN RAFAEL CITY COUNCIL APPROVING AMENDMENTS TO THE SAN RAFAEL GENERAL PLAN 2020, UPDATING POLICES, PROGRAMS AND LAND USE DESIGNATIONS IN RESPONSE TO THE 10 -YEAR REVIEW (GPA15-001) WHEREAS, on November 14, 2004, the City of San Rafael adopted Resolution Nos. 11664 and 11665 certifying the San Rafael General Plan 2020 Final Environmental Impact Report (General Plan 2020 FEIR) and adopting the San Rafael General Plan 2020 (General Plan 2020); and WHEREAS, the General Plan 2020 is comprised of 16 Elements containing Goals, Policies and Programs, and supportive background data, and the General Plan Land Use Map; and WHEREAS, since the 2004 adoption of the General Plan 2020, the City has adopted several amendments to the Plan consistent with the provisions of State Government Code Section 65358. The State law recognizes that the General Plan is intended to be amended periodically in that over time: a) there are changes in conditions and circumstances; b) there are changes in regulations and laws; and c) community goals and policies evolve. Further, as goals and policies are tested through interpretation and implementation, it is not uncommon that they are revised or amended to improve their application; and WHEREAS, General Plan Amendment GPA15-001 was initiated by the City to address the following activities and actions, grouped together as one general plan amendment action: A. General Plan 2020 Elements Policies and Programs Text Amendments: 1. Minor changes to LU -8, LU -8b, LU -30a, LU -21a, and LU -23c to update references, timeframes and/or responsibilities for implementation, including revision to Exhibit 11 to incorporate the Water land use designation description. 2. Minor changes to H-llb, H-12, H -12a, H-15 and H -19a to update timeframes, references, new zoning regulations, and responsibilities for implementation, including recognizing the adoption of the Junior Second Unit regulations. 3. Minor changes to NH -2a, NH -3, NH -15a, NH -16a, NH -18a, NH -21, NH -22, NH - 34a, NH -36, NH -36b, NH -54a, NH -74a, NH -75, NH-75am NH -76a, NH -86, NH - 86a, NH -88, NH -95, NH -95a, NH -98, NH -118a, NH -118b, NH -118c, NH -119, NH - 119a, NH -126a, NH -126a, NH -150a and NH -156a to reflect completion, incorporate references to completed or updated local and regional planning efforts, update responsibilities or resources, correct text, further facilitate policy or program implementation, change timeframes for implementation and add accomplishments. Specific accomplishments recognized by these changes include encouragement of mixed-use housing development including revisions made to the Neighborhood Commercial (NC) zoning district, adoption of the Canalfront Conceptual Design Plan and the securing of Barbier Park/Gold Hill access to open space. 4. Minor changes to CD -lb, CD3b, CD -3c, CD -4a, CD -4b, CD -4c, CD -4d, CD -5a, CD - 8a, CD -10b, CD -10c, CD -11a, CD -12a, CD -13 and CD -15b to adjust language, acknowledge zoning amendments made to facilitate reuse of historic resources and the completion of the Canalfront Conceptual Design Plan, revise references, and changes made to several implementation timeframes and resources. 5. Minor changes to EV -2e, EV -7a, EV -8b, EV -12b, EV -13a, EV -14, EV -15b and EV17a to delete the Day Laborers program which was implemented as a pilot program and not continued, change certain timeframes and references, and remove completed programs. 6. Minor changes to Goal 12, C -la, C -2a, C-7, C -I Ia, C -11e, C- 14a, C -17a, C -17b, C- 20, C -20a and C -29e to update references, remove outdated text, delete completed programs, reference updated and new policies including reference to the City adopted Complete Streets Directive, update to Exhibit 19 that shows the commute modes in the City, changes made to transit services, and to add new C-5.1 and C-5.1 a on VMT (Vehicle Miles Traveled) for Environmental Review. 7. Minor changes to I -4b, I -8b, I-12, 1-12a, I-13 and I -15b to delete completed programs, update references, remove obsolete programs and sources, including elimination of the Redevelopment Agency, encouraging replacement of street trees with invasive root systems, updating water supply calculations, and update telecommunications technology objective. 8. Minor changes to G-2, G-3, Goal 21, G-5, G-6, G-7, G-8, G -9b, G -I Ia, G- 12b, Goal 22 and G -18c to update references, remove or revise outdated text, expand upon Community Engagement objectives and to support governmental action to encourage a variety of housing options within the City. 9. Minor changes to SU -3a through SU -14d to delete completed items, update references and timeframes, update resources, revise numbering and relocate numerous policies and programs from the Conservation and Parks and Recreation Elements. In particular, modify policies to further encourage and support renewable energy use, local food production, social equity and reduce waste. 10. Minor changes to CA -la, CA -lb, CA -2, CA -6c, CA -8, CA -8a, CA -9a, CA -13a, CA - 14a, CA -14c to delete obsolete or completed items, and revise text or timeframes. This includes implementation of plans to support viable ongoing preservation and use of the Falkirk property. 11. Minor changes to PR -7b, PR -I Ia, PR -16a and PR -24a to remove outdated text, and delete completed or relocated items. 12. Minor changes to 5-12, S -12a, S -12b, S -13a, S -13b, S -13c, S -14a, S -16a, 5-21, S - 21a, new 5-21-b, S -26a, S -30b, S -33e and S -40c to reflect completed items, and references, particularly with regard to changes in oversight hazardous waste programs and disaster planning. 13. Minor changes to N -6b, N -6f, N-IOb, N-IOc and N-1Od to delete completed mixed use housing program, correct program numbering and update a timeframe. 14. Minor changes to OS -2d to update program numbering. 15. Minor changes to Goal 32 and CON -17 to CON -25 to reflect relocation of items to the Sustainability Element, and delete programs for increased energy efficiency in homes which has been effectively achieved by new programs and state building codes. 16. Minor changes to AW -4b and AW -6c to reflect completion of program and reference regarding eliminating fireplaces and woodburning stoves. B. General Plan 2020 Land Use Map Amendments: 1. Amend several SMART owned rights-of-way parcels to the Public/Quasi-Public (P/QP) land use designation. 2. Amend several City and County owned parcels that are being used for dedicated public purposes, to the P/QP or Open Space (OS) designations. 3. Establish a new Water land use designation for a number of publicly and privately owned properties within the Bay and San Rafael Canal, which are undevelopable and navigable open waterways, currently zoned for Water (W) use in the City Zoning Ordinance. 4. Amend the designation for a residential property at 1820 Pt San Pedro Road from Open Space to Low Density Residential (LDR) residential land use designation; and WHEREAS, consistent with City Council Resolution No. 8379 and State Government Code Section 65356, General Plan Amendment GPA15-001 has been processed consistent with adopted referral and scheduling procedures. As required, the project was referred to local agencies and utility/service districts for review and comment; and WHEREAS, on September 8, 2015, in accord with the California Government Code, specifically Section 65352.3(a), the Department of Community Development staff sent an offer for tribal consultation to the representatives of the Federated Indians of the Graton Rancheria (Federated Indians). Tribal consultation is required for all projects that propose an amendment to the local General Plan. The purpose of the tribal consultation is to consult with the local tribe representatives on potential impacts to Native American places, features and objects described in Section 5097.9 and 5097.993 of the California Public Resources Code. The prescribed 90 -day period was observed for the Federated Indians to respond to the offer, but the City received no response; and WHEREAS, consistent with California Government Code Section 65585, the draft amendments to the Housing Element have been distributed to the State of California Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD) for review and comment. HCD staff has reviewed the draft amendments to the Housing Element and determined that the updates proposed to the recently adopted Housing Element as a result of the 10 year status report would be inconsequential; and WHEREAS, following the initiation of the General Plan Amendment GPA15-001 application, the City commenced with environmental review of the project. Consistent with the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) Guidelines and the City of San Rafael Environmental Assessment Procedures Manual, the appropriate steps were followed to complete environmental review of the project, which included: a) review of the certified General Plan 2020 FEIR to determine if it adequately assesses the environmental impacts of the project; and b) the preparation of an Initial Study to determine if the project would result in new significant impacts, an increase in the severity of the impacts, or new or expanded mitigation measures from those analyzed and determined in the General Plan 2020 FEIR. As a result of this review, an Addendum to the General Plan 2020 FEIR (Addendum No. 4) was prepared. The Planning Commission has recommended to the City Council the adoption of Addendum No. 4 by separate resolution; and WHEREAS, on August 23, 2016, the Planning Commission conducted a duly noticed public hearing and reviewed and considered the General Plan Amendments (GPA 15-001) as well as Addendum No. 4 to the General Plan 2020 FEIR, along with the previously certified General Plan 2020 FEIR, and all applicable mitigation measures therein; and WHEREAS, on August 23, 2016, the Planning Commission unanimously adopted Resolution No. 16-21, recommending to the City Council adoption of the Addendum No. 4 to the San Rafael General Plan 2020 Final EIR; and WHEREAS, on August 23, 2016, the Planning Commission unanimously adopted Resolution No. 16-22 recommending to the City Council approval of the General Plan text and land use map amendments (GPA15-001). The Commission's recommendation for approval included one change to the General Plan amendments, specifically to change Housing Program H -15a by modifying the proposed amendments to the "Responsibility" section of H -15a to include both "Community Development" and "Parking Services" in the list of responsible Departments; and WHEREAS, the Planning Commission's recommendation to change Housing Program H -15a has been incorporated into Exhibit A attached hereto and incorporated herein by reference; and WHEREAS, on December 5, 2016, the City Council held a duly noticed public hearing to consider General Plan text and land use map amendments (GPA 15-001), including Addendum No. 4 to the General Plan 2020 FEIR, and accepted and considered all oral and written public testimony and the written report of the Planning Division. WHEREAS, the City Council, through adoption of a separate resolution, adopted Addendum No. 4 to the Certified San Rafael General Plan 2020 FEIR; and WHEREAS, the custodian of documents which constitute the record of proceedings upon which this decision is based, is the Community Development Department. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the City Council approves the General Plan Amendment (GPA15-001), amending the General Plan 2020 with the text edits presented in attached Exhibit A and map edits as presented in attached Exhibit B, incorporated herein by reference. This approval is based on and supported by the following findings: The public interest would be served by the adoption of proposed General Plan Amendment GPA51-001 in that: a. The amendments to delete completed programs and policies, to reassign responsibilities for action on programs, to update timeframes for implementation, and to update references within each of the 16 General Plan 2020 Elements will keep the document current, recognize changes in conditions and circumstances, recognize actions taken to adopt plans and regulations to implement several of the policies and programs, and further support the ongoing implementation of the General Plan through identification of key staff responsibilities and timeframes. b. The amendment to include a Water designation for the Bay and San Rafael Canal provides consistency between the San Rafael General Plan 2020 and the San Rafael Municipal Code, specifically with respect to Title 7 (Tideland Permits) and Title 14 (Zoning). c. The relocation of Goals, policies and programs from the Conservation and Parks and Recreation Element to the Sustainability Element appropriately retains these important short term and long term policies and programs to address sea level rise, climate change, and other actions that will support sustainable local planning efforts. d. The amendment to add a policy and program to the Circulation Element to acknowledge coming changes in state law to require local analysis of Vehicle Miles Traveled for projects appropriately responds to changing circumstances with respect to how these impacts of anticipated development projects would be evaluated on a broader level. 2. Adoption of General Plan Amendment GPA15-001 would not be growth inducing nor would it be precedent setting in that there are no substantive amendments proposed to the Land Use Element or the Housing Element. The changes would not result in a) changes to the adopted residential land use designations or their respective density parameters; b) changes to the adopted land use designations for individual properties/sites; c) changes in the housing projections from those projections published in the currently adopted Housing Element; or d) changes to the City's planning area. Therefore the changes do not induce new growth from that projected under the current General Plan 2020. Adoption of General Plan Amendment GPA15-001 would be consistent and would not conflict with the related elements, goals, policies or programs of the San Rafael General Plan 2020 in that there are no substantive changes proposed and the document has been reviewed and references have been revised to assure internal consistency. I, ESTHER C. BEIRNE, Clerk of the City of San Rafael, hereby certify that the foregoing resolution was duly and regularly introduced and adopted at a regular meeting of the City Council of said City held on Monday, the 5th day of December, 2016, by the following vote, to wit: AYES: COUNCILMEMBERS: Bushey, Colin, Gamblin, McCullough & Mayor Phillips NOES: COUNCILMEMBERS: None ABSENT: COUNCILMEMBERS: None ESTHER C. BEIRNE, City Clerk ATTACHMENTS: Exhibit A- Text Amendments Exhibit B- Land Use Map Amendments Land Use Introduction San Rafael is a highly desirable place to live, work, or own a business because of its natural beauty, its central location in Marin County, and its proximity to San Francisco. The city's residential and commercial areas represent a great variety in land uses, from the intermingling of residential and commercial uses Downtown, to the more prevalent twentieth-century land use patterns separating residential and commercial uses. The City provides many advantages of urban living, while at the same time maintaining a hometown feeling in its residential neighborhoods and a distinctive downtown. Careful planning and community involvement regarding development in the City and the surrounding area preserves important physical features, such as ridgelines, hillsides and natural areas, while also providing for necessary services, employment and housing opportunities. Land Use Benefits and Balance Land use decisions in San Rafael are shaped by the community's desire to preserve and protect its natural resources, unique character, existing land use patterns, and quality of life. The nature and character of existing development and the desire for a continued strong local economy as well as existing and planned infrastructure capacity (including circulation, water, and energy) all influence planning for future land use. San Rafael's local planning efforts must also be responsive to regional and statewide planning agencies such as the Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG), the Marin County Congestion Management Agency and the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans). The amount and type of urban areas in San Rafael will remain essentially the same in 2020 as they are today. Very few vacant parcels remain; growth will occur principally through infill and redevelopment. Our Use of Land San Rafael's Land Use Changes and Successe San Rafael has undergone many changes over the last several decades; here are some of the most notable: Our Vision of Downtown San Rafael led to the revitalization of Downtown, including new high quality buildings, redevelopment of underutilized and vacant lands, entertainment venues, and the construction of hundreds of new homes. San Rafael's Transportation Center has become a major transit hub for buses and other transportation in Marin County. Vision North San Rafael resulted in a planning guide north of Puerto Suello for development of a promenade for bicycles and pedestrians, a new entryway on Freitas, neighborhood -serving improvements at the Northgate shopping areas, and new housing. Large retailers and auto dealers increased sales tax revenue for the City, and occupy prominent locations along the Highway 101 corridor. Expansion of prominent land uses in San Rafael, such as the educational institutions of Dominican University and Marin Academy; the Montecito shopping center, Northgate Mall, and Northgate One benefited the community. Improvements to many parks in San Rafael, including Jean and John Starkweather Shoreline Park along San Rafael Bay, which provides recreational uses along the waterfront and increases the number of recreational opportunities for residents. Historic buildings have been identified and protected, including the Rafael Theatre, the Falkirk mansion, and the Frank Lloyd Wright -designed Marin County Civic Center Administration building. The community's desire for less commercial development, which will in turn require less additional housing, has resulted in 527,000 fewer square feet of commercial growth and 2.5 million fewer square feet of industrial/office development than projected under the previous General Plan 2000. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / LAND USE 11 The policies of this Element guide future change to fit the desired character of San Rafael, preserve the City's historic qualities and natural environment, serve community needs, sustain the local economy, and enhance the quality of life. San Rafael's land use policies balance the different desires of San Rafael's residents. The policies are based on the belief that clear direction will result in decisions and changes that carry on San Rafael's sense of place — a place people are proud to call `home.' Relationship to Other General Plan Elements California law requires the Land Use Element to designate the proposed general distribution, location, and extent of various categories of private and public land uses, and to set building intensity and population density standards. Other General Plan elements ensure that infrastructure, utilities, and public facilities are available to accommodate planned land uses, and that the unique qualities of San Rafael are safeguarded and enhanced. For example, maps, policies and programs related to flooding are located in the Safety Element. In particular, this Element establishes development patterns and densities that support the Circulation Element's strategies for reducing reliance on the automobile, accommodating increased traffic from planned development, and promoting a wide variety of mixed uses and activities in the Downtown and other commercial areas. The Land Use Element includes a Land Use Map. Relationship of the Land Use Element to the Zoning Map and Zoning Ordinance The Land Use Map designates the land use pattern envisioned for the City. Zoning Map designations must be consistent with the General Plan in relationship to each land use category. The Zoning Ordinance sets forth regulations and standards for development to ensure that the policies, goals, and objectives of the General Plan are carried out. Rezoning can be initiated by the City Council, Planning Commission, or by an individual property owner. General Plan 2020 Land Use Designations (acres) Parks/Open Space 43% =amity �ntial YO Multifamily Residential 5% Industrial/Light Commercial Industrial and and Office Public/Quasi- 4% Public 13% 12 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / LAND USE Amended 1/13/2016 GOAL 1: GROWTH TO ENHANCE QUALITY OF LIFE It is the goal of the City of San Rafael to have growth that serves community needs and enhances the quality of life in San Rafael. San Rafael values its historically significant and inspirational natural setting, with the widest variety of cultural, residential, employment, and entertainment offerings in Marin County. While the city will not grow significantly, it will be important to maintain and improve the existing types and areas of development that make San Rafael such a desirable place. Harmonizing change to serve community needs is of tremendous importance to San Rafael residents. New development and other physical alterations must respect the existing character and scale of the city. Change and development must be accomplished in a fashion that enhances and blends with San Rafael's existing qualities, both physical and social. In other words, development should respect the existing social fabric as well as the natural and built environment. General Plan 2020 leaves in place most current development and zoning standards. The City's zoning encourages housing and mixed-use development in Downtown and along the city's transit corridors. General Plan 2020 also calls for new development to contribute to the provision of necessary public improvements to serve current and future populations such as open space, transportation, and affordable housing. Targeting the type and location of new growth allows for the enhancement of areas that would benefit from improvement and adds needed jobs and housing without intruding on neighborhood quality of life. Affordable housing is a significant community need in San Rafael. Present and future residents of San Rafael need housing that is affordable at various income levels. Housing can be part of new buildings in areas of town which need to be improved, in Downtown and other commercial areas and along transit corridors so that residents can walk to work and shopping. At the same time, traffic congestion continues to be a major issue. In 1988, the City began a process called Priority Projects Procedure to allocate traffic capacity in certain areas of town in order to ensure consistency between new development and needed traffic improvements. In 2004, this program was replaced with a Project Selection Process (PSP) that applied citywide and evaluated desired community benefits of new development, while continuing to link new development with necessary roadway mitigations. However, by 2011, the purpose and importance of the PSP diminished because: a) the community is now largely built -out and there are very few remaining land development opportunities: and b) the limited traffic capacity has been used up or needed transportation improvements have been implemented. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 /LAND USE 13 .§ m !- ; !;!� " m m 14 SAN RA 9Rz ,iGNDUSE Amended mm@e Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 /LAND USE 15 N _ m @moo: N I r �1 V7 o N 8 ZL0 CD o o )aLu W Iv rNCnQ Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 /LAND USE 15 General Plan 2020 is based on the following growth assumptions: Exhibit 3: Growth Assumptions LU -1. Planning Area and Growth to 2020. Plan the circulation system and infrastructure to provide capacity for the total development expected by 2020. LU -la. Five -Year Growth Assessment. As part of the five-year General Plan update, review San Rafael's growth, traffic capacity, traffic mitigation list and traffic mitigation fee. Assess growth assumptions and modify land use and circulation policies as needed. Responsibility: Community Development, Public Works, Economic Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time See LU -3a (Project Selection Process). LU -2. Development Timing. For health, safety and general welfare reasons, new development should only occur when adequate infrastructure is available consistent with the following findings: a. Project -related traffic will not cause the level of service established in the Circulation Element to be exceeded; b. Any circulation improvements needed to maintain the level of service standard established in the Circulation Element have been programmed and funding has been committed; c. Environmental review of needed circulation improvement projects has been completed; d. The time frame for completion of the needed circulation improvements will not cause the level of service in the Circulation Element to be exceeded, or the findings set forth in Policy C-5 have been made; and e. Sewer, water, and other infrastructure improvements will be available to serve new development by the time the development is constructed. LU -2a. Development Review. Through the development and environmental review processes, ensure that policy provisions are evaluated and implemented. The City may waive or modify any policy requirement contained herein if it determines that the effect of implementing the same in the issuance of a development condition or other approvals would be to preclude all economically viable use of a subject property. Responsibility: Community Development, Public Works, Fire, Police, City Attorney Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees See also C-5 (Traffic Level of Service Standards). 16 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / LAND USE Amended 1/13/2016 Existing (plus Use approved projects) Projected 2020 % Increase Housing (units) 28,929 32,423 12.0% Commercial (sq. ft.) 9,030,000 9,183,000 1.7% Office/Industrial (sq. ft.) 9,031,000 9,279,000 2.7% Lodging (rooms) 464 821 77.0% Entertainment (seats) 3,010 5,010 166.0% LU -1. Planning Area and Growth to 2020. Plan the circulation system and infrastructure to provide capacity for the total development expected by 2020. LU -la. Five -Year Growth Assessment. As part of the five-year General Plan update, review San Rafael's growth, traffic capacity, traffic mitigation list and traffic mitigation fee. Assess growth assumptions and modify land use and circulation policies as needed. Responsibility: Community Development, Public Works, Economic Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time See LU -3a (Project Selection Process). LU -2. Development Timing. For health, safety and general welfare reasons, new development should only occur when adequate infrastructure is available consistent with the following findings: a. Project -related traffic will not cause the level of service established in the Circulation Element to be exceeded; b. Any circulation improvements needed to maintain the level of service standard established in the Circulation Element have been programmed and funding has been committed; c. Environmental review of needed circulation improvement projects has been completed; d. The time frame for completion of the needed circulation improvements will not cause the level of service in the Circulation Element to be exceeded, or the findings set forth in Policy C-5 have been made; and e. Sewer, water, and other infrastructure improvements will be available to serve new development by the time the development is constructed. LU -2a. Development Review. Through the development and environmental review processes, ensure that policy provisions are evaluated and implemented. The City may waive or modify any policy requirement contained herein if it determines that the effect of implementing the same in the issuance of a development condition or other approvals would be to preclude all economically viable use of a subject property. Responsibility: Community Development, Public Works, Fire, Police, City Attorney Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees See also C-5 (Traffic Level of Service Standards). 16 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / LAND USE Amended 1/13/2016 (LU -3 Deleted) LU -4. Reasonable Interim Use of Property. Allow a landowner reasonable interim use of property in areas where development is precluded pending needed traffic improvements. Structures should not be permanent, and uses should be low- or off-peak traffic generators. LU -4a. Reasonable Interim Uses. In the zoning ordinance establish land uses that allow reasonable interim uses for properties that are in areas with limited traffic capacity for development. Examples include contractor's yards, new car storage, modular office and storage, and outdoor recreation. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time LU -5. Urban Service Area. Oppose urban development in areas adjacent to San Rafael's Urban Service Area boundary. LU -5a. Urban Service Area Review. Review and consider revisions to the City's Urban Service Area every five years as part of the General Plan Review, or in conjunction with a LAFCO-initiated boundary review Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time See also LU -7a (Development Adjacent to San Rafael) Sphere of Influence/ Urban Service Area A Sphere of Influence is the probable physical boundaries and service area of a local agency. (Govt. Code Section 54774). It is recognized that some urban services are provided by special districts. The Urban Service Area is an area that can reasonably be annexed and provided with urban services within a five-year period, given the amount of potential development within City limits and limited circulation and sewage treatment plant capacity or other service constraints. San Rafael's Planning Area includes all the lands currently within the Sphere of Influence shown on Exhibit 1 except for the St. Vincent's and Silviera Ranch properties. Upon LAFCO approval to remove the St. Vincent's and Silveira Ranch properties from San Rafael's Sphere of Influence, the Planning Area and the Sphere of Influence shall be the same. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / LAND USE 17 LU -6. Annexation. Prior to urban development, areas that can reasonably be served through extension of the existing service area of the City should be annexed. a. L A F C Annexation of already developed unincorporated islands (Los Ranchitos, Country Club, Bayside Acres, California Park, Mt. Tamalpais Cemetery) and developed portions of the Marinwood/Lucas Valley neighborhoods should be dependent on resident interest, the cost/revenue implications of the provision of City services to the area, and the O availability of City services. Local Agency Formation Commission (LAFCO) coordinates logical and timely changes in local governmental boundaries, including annexations and detachments of territory, incorporations of cities, formations of special districts, and consolidations, mergers, and dissolutions of districts, as well as reviewing ways to reorganize, simplify, and streamline governmental structure. In addition, LAFCO is responsible for reviewing contractual service agreements between property owners and service providers. b. Developed and undeveloped areas of Santa Venetia are not expected to be annexed to the City within the time frame of the plan due to flood and seismic hazards and urban service costs associated with existing infrastructure conditions. LU -6a. LAFCO. Encourage LAFCO to adopt Urban Service Area and annexation policies for the San Rafael Planning Area consistent with adopted General Plan policies. Consistent with Council Resolution not to annex or serve the St. Vincent's and Silveira properties, work with LAFCO to remove them from the City's Sphere of Influence. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time LU -7. Land Use Planning in Surrounding Jurisdictions. Continue to monitor and work with surrounding jurisdictions to ensure that land uses outside the community will have a positive effect on San Rafael. LU -7a. Development Adjacent to San Rafael. Work with the County and other local jurisdictions to review applications for development in areas adjacent to San Rafael's city limits and within the Sphere of Influence. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time LU -8. Density of Residential Development. Residential densities are shown in Exhibit 11, Land Use Categories, pages 3-49. Maximum densities are not guaranteed but minimum densities are generally required. Density of residential development on any site shall respond to the following factors: site resources and constraints, potentially hazardous conditions, traffic and access, adequacy of infrastructure, City design policies and development patterns and prevailing densities of adjacent developed areas. When development is clustered to avoid sensitive areas of a site, density provided to the entire site may be transferred to the remaining portion of the site, providing all factors listed above can be met. Transfer of density among properties shall only be permitted when unique or special circumstances (e.g., preservation of wetlands or historic buildings) are found to exist which would cause significant environmental impacts if the transfer were not allowed. 18 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / LAND USE Amended 1/13/2016 LU -8a. Residential Zoning. Implement Land Use Element densities by setting appropriate maximum allowed densities in the zoning ordinance. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time LU -8b. Transfer of Density. Continue to implement zoning regulations governing the transfer of density among properties. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees See Housing H -14b4 -9b (Assure -Efficient Use of Multifamily Housing Sites), H-17a24a (Impleme State Density Bonus Law) and OS -lc (Cluster Development). LU -9. Intensity of Nonresidential Development. Commercial and industrial areas have been assigned floor area ratios (FARs) to identify appropriate intensities (see Exhibits 4, 5 and 6). Maximum allowable FARs are not guaranteed, particularly in environmentally sensitive areas. Intensity of commercial and industrial development on any site shall respond to the following factors: site resources and constraints, traffic and access, potentially hazardous conditions, adequacy of infrastructure, and City design policies. Population Density Gross Density is used for long-range planning purposes, and is the number of dwelling units per acre devoted to a site plus the area of streets serving those sites. Gross density is approximately 20 - 30 percent lower than net density. Net Density is used in the Zoning Ordinance to determine project - specific densities, and is the number of dwelling units per acre of land devoted to a site. Net density does not include the area of streets serving those sites, and is approximately 20- 30 percent higher than gross density. In 2000, residential areas have been assigned appropriate densities (see Exhibit 11, Land Use Categories). In San Rafael's Planning Area, there were 2.44 people per household (PPH). ABAG projects that this number will increase to 2.47 PPH by 2010, and return to 2.44 PPH in 2020. a. Where the existing building is larger than the FAR limit and no intensification or change of use is proposed, the property may be redeveloped at the same size as the existing building if parking and design requirements in effect at the time of the new application can be met. b. FAR transfers between or among sites shall not be permitted except where the City Council finds the following: 1. The development of the beneficiary parcel is consistent with the General Plan 2020, except that FARs or maximum densities may be exceeded, and 2. The proposed development will comply with all applicable zoning and design parameters and criteria as well as traffic requirements; and one or both of the following: i) Unique or special circumstances are found to exist (e.g., preservation of wetlands or historic buildings) that would cause significant environmental impacts if the transfer is not allowed, and/or F I o o r A r e a R a t i o ( F A R) FAR is the total gross building square footage divided by the land area, exclusive of public streets. Parking areas, covered or uncovered, and non -leasable covered atriums are not included in calculating FARS. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / LAND USE 19 ii) A significant public benefit will be provided, such as securing a new public facility site (e.g. park, school, library, fire station, police station). c. Through Planned Development rezoning, consider allowing a higher floor area ratio at the shopping center sites located at the crossroads of Andersen Drive, Highway 101, and Francisco Blvd. West where it would facilitate redevelopment with improved parking, access, landscaping and building design. LU -9a. Nonresidential Zoning. Implement nonresidential levels of development and FAR transfer policies through allowed floor area ratios in zoning districts. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time See NH -104a (Development Review Process). 20 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / LAND USE Amended 1/13/2016 •. Exhibit 4 . Floor Area Ratios in Central San Rafael El General Commercial and Neighborhood Commercial: a. Commercial Sales of Bulk Items and Specialty Retail: .26 b. General Retail and Sevice: .18 Office: .22 Light Industrial/Office and Industrial: .33 Hillside Areas: Undeveloped commercial or industrial properties shall be limited to the following development intensities based on slope: Portions with less than 5% slope: 100% of applicable FAR. Portions with 5-15% slope: 50-75% of applicable FAR. Portions with slope greater than 15% slope: 0.01 FAR Clustering of development is encouraged and may be required to avoid sensitive areas. NOTES: FAR for POP and parks is 1.0, and for open space is generally 0.0. Ministorage in industrial and light industriallofce districts has an FAR Of 1.0. ® 0.02 FAR ® 0.50 FAR ® 0.32 FAR - OAOFAR - 0.70 FAR ® 1.00 FAR �■■� FAR - 1 General Commercial and ■ ■ Neighborhood Commercial: a. Commercial Sales of Bulk Items and Specialty Retail: 32 b. General Retail and Sevice: 21 Office: .26 Light Industrial/Office: 44. Light Industrial / Office 75-100 0-25 .38 50-75 25-50 .30 25-50 50-75 .28 0-25 75 -100 .26 El General Commercial and Neighborhood Commercial: a. Commercial Sales of Bulk Items and Specialty Retail: .26 b. General Retail and Sevice: .18 Office: .22 Light Industrial/Office and Industrial: .33 Hillside Areas: Undeveloped commercial or industrial properties shall be limited to the following development intensities based on slope: Portions with less than 5% slope: 100% of applicable FAR. Portions with 5-15% slope: 50-75% of applicable FAR. Portions with slope greater than 15% slope: 0.01 FAR Clustering of development is encouraged and may be required to avoid sensitive areas. NOTES: FAR for POP and parks is 1.0, and for open space is generally 0.0. Ministorage in industrial and light industriallofce districts has an FAR Of 1.0. • Exhibit 5 ' •aM kaYall •YXY lAI lIAX Floor Area Ratios in North San Rafael ® 0.30 FAR ® 0.32 FAR Hillside Areas: Undeveloped commercial or industrial properties shall be limited to the following development intensities based on slope: Portions with less than 5% slope: 100% of applicable FAR. Portions with 5-15% slope: 50-75% of applicable FAR. Portions with slope greater than 15% slope: 0.01 FAR Clustering of development is encouraged and may be required to avoid sensitive areas. NOTES: FAR for PQP and parks is 1.0, and for open space is generally 0.0. Ministorage in industrial and light industrialloffice districts has an FAR Of 1.0. 0 10w M 3wo 4000 sow FMI li poll :l Tr I` LU -10. Planned Development Zoning. Require Planned Development zoning for development on a lot larger than five acres in size, except for the construction of a single-family residence. LU -10a. Planned Development Zoning. Continue to maintain a Planned Development zoning district. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time LU -11. School Site Reuse or Redevelopment. Where it is in the community's interest to retain public recreation facilities in accordance with Parks and Recreation policies, and/or the childcare policy, cluster development so that the public recreation or childcare use may be preserved. The following uses are allowed on school sites retained by the districts: housing and public and quasi -public uses, such as child care programs; adult day care programs; education, recreation, cultural programs and activities; and churches and religious institutions. LU -11a. Zoning for School Sites. Continue to implement school site reuse and redevelopment through zoning regulations and through the development review process. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time See NH -12 (Schools). LU -12. Building Heights. Citywide height limits in San Rafael are described in Exhibits 7 and 8. For Downtown height limits see Exhibit 9: a. Height of buildings existing or approved as of January 1, 1987 shall be considered conforming to zoning standards. b. Hotels have a 54 -foot height limit, except where a taller height is shown on Exhibit 9 (Downtown Building Height Limits). c. Height limits may be exceeded through granting of a zoning exception or variance, or through a height bonus as described in LU -13 (Height Bonuses). See LU -2a (Development Review). Building Height The height of a building is determined by the methods in the latest edition of the Uniform Building Code adopted by the City, except for hillside homes, where height is determined by the methods in the Hillside Design Guidelines. 24 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / LAND USE Amended 1/13/2016 a R a f a e l B a y Exhibit 7 o Building Height Limits in Central San Rafael i 0 500 1000 1.500 Meter. D 05 1 Mile. J San Rafael City Limit Planning Area and Sphere of InBuence Boundary ' 30 Feet 36 Feet -Neighborhood Commercial: 30 feet for a single use building, 36 feet for a mixed use building. 0 500 1000 1.500 Meter. D 05 1 Mile. J Exhibit 8 a OLXLaAIAr LAIr Building Height Limits in North San Rafael San Rafael City Limit Planning Area F- 30 Feet 36 Feet -Neighborhood Commercial: 30 feet fora single use building, 36 feet for a mixed use building. 0500 1000 1500 Meters 0S 1 1.5 Was ■��# �1 rJill Thi. base —pwe. d..eleped en fu aI Ren e.�7e.11re Cly e1 Sen Rafael is——ponelble nor fable nor use 7e1mM he Intended W?— '0 i , i �f I IIA 9F — Exhibit Building Height Limits in Downtown San Rafael Outside of Downtown: 30 Feet 36 Feet •? Neighborhood Commercial: 30 feet for a single use building, 36 feet for a mixed use building. 0 500 taco 1600 U19M 500 1000 rad LU -13. Height Bonuses. A height bonus may be granted with a use permit for a development that provides one or more of the amenities listed in Exhibit 10, provided the building's design is consistent with Community Design policies and design guidelines. No more than one height bonus may be granted for a project. See LU -2a. (Development Review). Exhibit 1 0: Height Bonuses Location Maximum Amenity Height Bonus (May provide one or more of the following) Fourth Street Retail Core Zoning District PG&E site in the Lindaro Office land use district Second/Third Mixed Use East Zoning District Second/Third Mixed Use West District, north of Third Street and east of C Street West End Village Lincoln Avenue between Hammondale and Mission Avenue Marin Square Affordable housing 12 feet Public courtyards, plazas and/or passageways (consistent with Downtown Design Guidelines) Public parking (not facing Fourth Street) Park (privately maintained park with public access, adjacent to Mahon Creek; an 24 feet alternative is tennis courts tied to Albert Park.) Community facility (10,000 sq. ft. or more in size) Affordable housing Public parking 12 feet Overhead crosswalks Mid -block passageways between Fourth Street and parking on Third Street 18 feet Public parking Affordable housing 6 feet Public parking Public passageways (consistent with Downtown Design Guidelines) 12 feet Affordable Housing See NH -120 (Lincoln Avenue) 12 feet Affordable housing North San Rafael Town 24 feet Center Citywide where allowed by 12 feet zoning. (1) See policy LU -20 (Hotels, Motels and Inns) Affordable housing Hotel (1) 28 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / LAND USE Amended 1/13/2016 GOAL 2: BALANCE AND DIVERSITY It is the goal of the City of San Rafael to maintain balance and diversity in the community. San Rafael reflects a mosaic of land use patterns that have changed over time, creating a visual framework for the city that continues to evolve in response to the community's sense of balance and compatibility. Our desire to avoid intensification must be balanced with the development required to provide jobs and housing, and to sustain an evolving, vital community. We must also continue to appreciate the importance and desirability of having neighborhoods of differing levels of density and activity. San Rafael's high quality cultural, business, entertainment and educational resources directly benefit the City's residents and draw businesses, customers, visitors and students from beyond the City's limits, to the benefit of all who live and work in the City. These resources not only culturally enrich San Rafael residents, they enhance San Rafael's regional position, improve San Rafael's business climate, and provide revenue for City services and infrastructure. To maintain our unique character and quality of life, the City must strive to maintain the cultural, social, and economic diversity that is such an important aspect of our City by taking steps to maintain an adequate supply of decent, affordable housing, a range of jobs, and a variety of local goods and services. Other elements in the General Plan address housing, economic vitality, open space, recreation, and cultural facilities; the policies below focus on the nonresidential land uses that make up part of the balance and diversity of San Rafael. LU -14. Land Use Compatibility. Design new development in mixed residential and commercial areas to minimize potential nuisance effects and to enhance their surroundings. LU -14a. Land Use Compatibility. Evaluate the compatibility of proposed residential use in commercial areas through the development review process. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees LU -15. Convenience Shopping. Encourage the retention and improvement of existing retail stores and services in residential neighborhoods that provide needed neighborhood services and reduce traffic. LU -15a. Neighborhood Commercial. Evaluate the compatibility of proposed neighborhood commercial center use or upgrades through the development review process, and involve neighbors early in the development review. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees See NH -155a (Sun Valley Commercial Uses) and CD -3b (Development Standards). Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / LAND USE 29 LU -16. Building and Automotive Services. Maintain availability of sites for building, automotive and service industries important to San Rafael's economy and the convenience of its residents and businesses. LU -16a. Building and Automotive Services. Continue to provide adequate sites for building, automotive and service industries in the appropriate zoning districts. Sites with industrial and light industrial zoning may be redesignated and rezoned to a different land use with Council determination that the new use provides a substantial neighborhood or citywide benefit. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time LU -17. Limited Retail and Service Uses in Industrial and Office Areas. Allow limited retail and service uses that serve area businesses/workers to locate throughout industrial/office and industrial areas. LU -17a. Retail and Service Uses in Industrial and Office Areas. Continue to provide adequate sites for small local -serving retail and service businesses in industrial and office zoning districts. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time The Community Services Department operates the largest day care program in Marin County. LU -18. Lot Consolidation. Commercial and higher density residential parcels less than 6,000 square feet in size should be encouraged to be combined to provide adequate parking and circulation, minimize driveway cuts on busy streets, and maximize development and design potential. LU -18a. Lot Consolidation. Continue to encourage small lot consolidation through zoning regulations. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time LU -19. Childcare. Plan for and encourage the development of new and the retention of existing childcare centers to meet neighborhood and citywide childcare needs. In conjunction with the school districts, encourage continuation of childcare programs at school sites because of their suitability for such uses and convenient locations in residential neighborhoods. LU -19a. Zoning for Childcare Programs. Evaluate and revise if necessary zoning requirements to allow childcare centers in all zoning districts except Hillside Resource Residential, Hillside Residential and Water and Open Space Districts. The City may waive FARs for childcare centers in nonresidential and mixed-use buildings. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time 30 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / LAND USE Amended 1/13/2016 LU -19b. Fees for Childcare Programs. Where possible, waive application and permit fees for childcare centers. Consider exempting childcare centers from traffic mitigation fees. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time LU -20. Hotels, Motels and Inns. Encourage redevelopment and upgrading of existing motels and hotels. Visitor accommodations are a desired land use because they are a low traffic -generator and a high tax -generator, and because they have identifiable benefits to the neighborhood such as job training programs. With a Use Permit, allow hotels, motels and inns in most commercial, multifamily and industrial zoning districts. With a Use Permit, allow bed -and -breakfast inns in High Density, Medium Density and Large Lot Residential Land Use Districts. Hotels are not subject to floor area ratio requirements. The City Council may approve a height bonus per LU -13 (Height Bonuses) if it finds that the hotel will be a significant community benefit and that the design is acceptable and consistent with City design policies and guidelines. LU -20a. Hotel Zoning. F-v�Maintain zoning ordinance an"xiioa v miassa}y to inearpamte-regulations allowins height bonus and exemption from FARs for hotels. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: ShnOn oing Resources: Staff Time See 1U 2a. (Development Review) LU -21. Ministorage and Storage. Ministorage is allowed in light industrial/office and industrial districts. For lots facing Highways 101 or 580 or the Bay, the ministorage use must be located at the rear of the lot behind an active streetfront use. Ministorage may be permitted with an FAR of up to 1.0 if the following findings can be made: a. The facility is needed in the community; b. The project is compatible with surrounding uses; c. The project is designed so that it cannot be converted to other, more intensive uses; and, d. The location is appropriate for this type of use. In other land use districts, ministorage may be allowed in existing buildings, provided that the ministorage is not located along the street frontage and complies with the FAR limits allowable in the districts. LU -21a. Ministorage Zoning. zoning ordinance and revise as necessary to imorNmt.�-reeulations for ministora2c use allowance and location limitations. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Shat4 TeEmOngoing Resources: Staff Time Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / LAND USE 31 LU -22. Odor Impacts. Consider odor impacts when evaluating land uses and development projects near wastewater treatment plants, or treatment plant expansion projects. LU -22a. Project Evaluation. Evaluate odor impacts as part of development review. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees LU -23. Land Use Map and Categories. Land use categories are generalized groupings of land uses and titles that define a predominant land use type (See Exhibit 11). All proposed projects must meet density and FAR standards (See Exhibits 4, 5 and 6) for that type of use, and other applicable development standards. Some listed uses are conditional uses in the zoning ordinance and may be allowed only in limited areas or under limited circumstances. Maintain a Land Use Map that illustrates the distribution and location of land uses as envisioned by General Plan policies. (See Exhibit 11). LU -23a. Zoning Ordinance Amendments. Revise the zoning ordinance, including the zoning map, to implement General Plan land use designations, densities, intensities, and policies, and to meet requirements of State law and court decisions. Responsibility: Community Development, Economic Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time LU -23b. Subdivision Ordinance Amendments. Revise the subdivision ordinance where necessary for conformance with General Plan land use designations, densities, intensities, and policies and include provisions for adequate enforcement of conditions of subdivision map approval. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time LU -23c. Live/work Regulations. Revise live/work zoning regulations to ensure that live/work units are appropriately designed and used for combined residential and business uses. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: ShoALong Term Resources: Staff Time LU -23d. Industrial Zoning Districts. Reevaluate and modify as needed definitions and FARs for Industrial and Light Industrial/Office Zoning District. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time 32 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / LAND USE Amended 1/13/2016 Exhibit 1 1: Land Use Categories Gross Density Land Use Residential Category Units/Acre Residential Land Uses Residential, open space/conservation, parks/playgrounds, schools, churches, plant nurseries, group day care and large day care facilities. In medium and high density neighborhoods, hotels/motels, clubs and similar uses may be allowed. Public/quasi public uses, such as churches and schools, in residential zones shall not exceed a 1.0 FAR and shall meet City development standards including the zoning height and setback requirements. Hillside Resource 0.1 - 0.5 Characterized by very steep slopes which have geologic and Residential seismic constraints and which have community visual significance or which have been identified as having very limited potential through prior development approvals. This designation is typical of sensitive hillside areas in the Planning Area. Hillside 0.5 - 2 Characterized by moderate to steep slopes; may have unstable Residential geology and/or local visual significance. Typical of developed hillside residential areas in the Planning Area. Large Lot 0.5 - 2 Flat or gently sloping single-family large lots/large lot subdivision. Residential Low Density 2 - 6.5 Typical of single-family areas. Residential Medium Density 6.5 - 15 Typical of duplex, garden apartment, and condominiums. Residential High Density 15 32 Typical of apartment densities. Residential Mixed Use Fifth/Mission 15 32 Residential uses and office uses are allowed. Ground floor retail Residential/Office and personal services uses are allowed from "C" Street east, on cross streets between Fourth Street and Fifth Avenue. Fourth Street 32 62 Retail, service, entertainment, cultural, office, residential and Retail Core live/work uses are allowed. Residential uses are allowed on the rear ground floor, second floor and above. On Fourth Street, first floor street frontage uses which encourage an active and healthy retail center are characterized by all of the following: high customer turnover, large volume of pedestrian traffic, windows, storefront displays and signs, and merchandise or service likely to be obtained in a multiple stop trip, or similar activity which draws large number of people Downtown. General 15 — 32 General retail and service uses, restaurants, automobile sales and Commercial service uses, and hotels/motels. Offices as secondary uses except along Francisco Blvd. West where retail redevelopment is strongly encouraged Netherton Office 32 — 62 Office use; and ground floor retail, personal service, food service and live/work uses are allowed. Residential and live -work uses are permitted on the upper floors on Fourth Street, and on the ground floor and above elsewhere. Lindaro Mixed 6.5 - 15 Motor vehicle service, contractor uses, light manufacturing; Use distribution, warehousing and storage, and incidental employee - serving retail/service allowed. Live/work use allowed. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / LAND USE 33 Gross Density Land Use Residential Category Units/Acre Land Uses Lindaro Office 15 — 32 Office, hotel, cultural or entertainment facility; or residential if feasible. Marine Related 6.5 — 15 Water dependent businesses such as boat building; boat repair, sales and service uses; marinas; and boat charter services. Other uses that draw people to the waterfront that may be allowed include shopping centers, restaurants, hotels/motels, retail, and parks. Residential use and non -marine related office use is allowed on the second floor and above. Neighborhood 6.5 15 Neighborhood -serving retail and service uses such as pharmacies, Commercial supermarkets and dry cleaners. Residential use allowed. Ancillary office uses allowed. Office 15 — 32 General offices, medical and professional offices, administrative or headquarters offices, and residential uses. Public/Quasi- 15-32 Government or quasi -public buildings or facilities; utility facilities Public and similar facilities owned or operated by public/non-profit agencies; residential. An exemption to development standards may be granted if findings are made that a higher height or FAR is necessary for health or safety purposes. Residential/Office 15 — 32 Residential and office uses allowed. Limited retail or service uses may be permitted as conditional uses. Retail/Office 15 — 32 Retail and service uses, offices, and residential uses allowed. Second/Third 32- 62 Office and office -support retail and service uses (such as copy Street Mixed -Use shops, food service and cleaners) are encouraged throughout the district. Residential uses and additional retail uses are allowed as follows: On Second and Third Streets east of "B" Street, limited auto - serving retail (such as gas stations), and residential uses as part of a mixed-use development are allowed. On Second and Third Streets west of "B" Street, retail usually accessed by car including daily needs retail (such as grocery and drug stores), limited auto -serving retail (such as gas stations), large item retail (such as furniture stores) and residential uses are allowed. On the cross streets, neighborhood serving and specialty retail uses are encouraged in order to have an active pedestrian environment. Residential use is also encouraged, especially west of "B" Street. West End Village 15 32 Retail uses, especially specialty and neighborhood serving retail and restaurants. Personal service, high customer -volume office and limited amounts of other office uses are also allowed. Residential and live -work uses are permitted on the upper floor of Fourth Street, and on the ground floor and above elsewhere. Nonresidential Industrial 0 Motor vehicle service, contractor uses and yards; manufacturing; storage uses; wholesale; incidental employee -serving retail/service uses; specialty retail uses consistent with industrial uses; rock, sand and gravel plants; solid waste management and recycling facilities; trucking yards or terminals; ancillary offices and small offices. Light Industrial/ 0 Allowed uses include: motor vehicle service, contractor uses and Office yards; light manufacturing; distribution; warehousing and storage, incidental employee -serving retail/service; office use; and region - serving specialty retail when contained in a building of 50,000 square feet or greater in size and located on a site greater than 1C acres. Other specialty retail uses may be allowed to occupy minor portions of the Light Industrial/Office districts provided that intensity and traffic standards are met and the integrity of the district is not threatened. 34 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / LAND USE Amended 1/13/2016 Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / LAND USE 35 Gross Density Land Use Residential Category Units/Acre Land Uses Airport/ 0 Uses on this site are governed by a land use covenant agreed to by Recreation the City, the County, and the property owner. Recognize the unique and valuable recreational and environmental characteristics of the airport site. The following uses are allowed on the property: Uses consistent with the 2002 Master Use Permit, including the airport and ancillary airport services and light industrial uses. Private and public recreational uses. Public utility uses. Mineral 0 Quarry and brick yard uses, which utilize mineral resources of Resources regional significance. Parks 0 Parks Open Space 0 Secured public and private open space. Conservation - Areas identified as having visual or other natural resource significance that should be protected through the development review process. The conservation designation is applied to environmentally sensitive areas that are part of a larger site of contiguous parcels under common ownership. Absent evidence that some portion of the area is appropriate for development, no development of residential, industrial or commercial buildings shall be allowed. The City will consider some level of intensity and density of development upon evidence that such use is appropriate. Upon evidence, the land use designation(s) may be revised through the General Plan amendment process. Water 0 Maior navigable bodies of water, applicable to the bav, and canal, excluding creeks and drainage ways. The Wate- District provides an opportunity for limited water -dependent uses w rich require access to the water as a central element of its basic function, and which contribute to the maritime character of the area. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / LAND USE 35 36 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / LAND USE Amended 1/13/2016 Exhibit 12, Land Use Map (available under separate cover) Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / LAND USE 37 Housing Element Resolution No. 13863 EIR Addendum Resolution No. 13862 i S %, .N1W&91;W7�♦V0boll 1107,t;1�' 2015 - 2023 Housing Element FOR (1 a r F y vA ETIs IS I Policies and Programs January 5, 2015 Acknowledgements Citv Council Gary O. Phillips, Mayor Andrew Cuyugan McCullough, Vice Mayor Kate Colin Maribeth Bushey John Gamblin Planning Commission Jack Robertson, Chair Barrett Schaefer, Vice Chair Gerald Belletto Mark Lubamersky Larry Paul Charles Pick Viktoriya Wise Citv Manager Nancy Mackle Community Development Paul Jensen, AICP, Community Development Director Raffi Boloyan, Planning Manager Economic Development Stephanie Lovette, Economic Development Manager Consultants Metropolitan Planning Group (M -Group) Geoff I. Bradley, AICP, Principal Dave Javid, AICP, LEED AP, Project Manager Justin Shiu, Assistant Planner Karen Warner Associates, Inc. Karen Warner, AICP, Owner Introduction to Policies and Program (2015-2023 Housing Element) In developing the 2015-2023 Housing Element, the City saw the opportunity to consolidate, reorganize, and refine the Policies and Programs sections to more effectively communicate the goals, aspirations, and direction of housing policies. Using the 2009-2014 Housing Element Policies and Programs section as the basis for the updated section, the policies and programs were evaluated on their accomplishments, effectiveness, and appropriateness for the 2015-2023 Housing Element. The City of San Rafael has taken this opportunity to organize this set of policies and programs in a way that allows the City to keep building off of the successes and accomplishments of the previous Housing Element. The Policies and Programs section of the 2009-2014 Housing Element, was an integrated part of the City's General Plan. As such, this policy document is intended to take the place of the previous Housing Element on pages 39-62 of the 2020 General Plan. Public Participation Government Code Section 65583(c)(8) states that each Housing Element shall "include a diligent effort by the local government to achieve public participation of all economic segments of the community in the development of the Housing Element, and the program shall describe this effort." Through meetings that facilitated discussion on housing needs and appropriate housing programs for San Rafael, the City has provided opportunities for the community to become part of the process that would set the framework for housing development. The City provided notice of the Housing Element update to members of the community and interested parties, in formats ranging in scale from public meetings to smaller group presentations. Notification was provided in the newspaper and direct notification was sent to over 100 interested groups and individuals, including nonprofit organizations, advocacy groups, homeowners associations, local agencies, and other interested parties. A list of parties that were on the noticing list is shown in Appendix B. The City solicited public input in two Planning Commission Study Session meetings. The first meeting was held on April 29, 2014. Information from the completed Housing Needs Assessment was presented, covering prominent housing issues that currently affect the community and will be lasting concerns over the planning period. The second meeting was held on August 12, 2014. A draft of the Housing Element, which was available to the public in advance, was discussed at the meeting. In addition, City staff met with groups representing diverse housing needs. A summary of the housing needs assessment and draft Housing Element Update was given and made accessible to neighborhood and homeowners associations, including the North San Rafael Coalition and Federation of San Rafael Neighborhoods. Through notifications or direct contact, the City reached out to advocacy groups and organizations promoting quality housing for low income and special needs groups. These organizations included EDEN Housing, Marin Environmental Housing Collaborative, Fair Housing of Marin, Canal Alliance, and Habitat for Humanity. The City held smaller informational focus group meetings with organizations for those that requested them. The list in Appendix B-6 Public Participation shows the organizations that received notifications. Comments that arose from the meetings included the following: • Concern about the affordability of housing. • Preservation of programs to help lower income and special needs households. • Desire to promote second units and junior second units. • Consideration of impact of development on the character of the city. • Support provision of affordable housing through securing new funding sources and offering technical assistance for affordable housing development. • Consideration of expanding incentives to promote affordable housing development. These comments have been considered and addressed by Planning Commissioners and City staff present at the meetings and reflected in the Housing Element. Programs under Policy H- 7 Protection of Existing Housing Stock, Policy H-11 House Sharing and Policy H-16 Second Units cover strategies to preserve the affordable housing stock and increase alternative lower income housing options. Programs under Policy H-9 Special Needs aim to promote quality housing opportunities for special needs populations. The consideration of development impacts are addressed in programs under Policy H-2 Design that Fits into the Neighborhood Context. Within Policy H-6 Funding for Affordable Housing, programs address objectives to secure funding sources. Programs under Policy H-14 Adequate Sites and Policy H-17 Regulatory Processes and Incentives for Affordable Housing discuss incentives that can be explored or offered for affordable housing. Upon completion of the draft Housing Element, the City circulates a Notice of Availability to a variety of interested organizations. The Notice defines a 60 -day review and comment period. Relationship to Other General Plan Elements The General Plan serves as the 'constitution' for development in the city. It is a long-range planning document that describes goals, policies, and programs to guide decision making. Once the General Plan is adopted, all development -related decisions must be consistent with the plan. If a development proposal is not consistent with the plan, the proposal must be revised or the plan itself must be amended. State law requires a community's General Plan to be internally consistent. This means that the Housing Element, although subject to special requirements and a different schedule of updates, must function as an integral part of the overall General Plan, with consistency between it and the other General Plan elements. Land use and development projections of the General Plan are also linked to planned facilities and infrastructure capacity. Specific issues addressed in other sections of the General Plan that are linked to and supported in the Housing Element, include: (1) the design of housing; (2) housing and circulation; (3) reduction of greenhouse gases; and (4) support services and infrastructure for the community. The City will ensure consistency between the Housing Element and the other General Plan elements so that policies introduced in one element are consistent with other elements. Whenever any element of the General Plan is amended in the future, the Housing Element will be reviewed and modified, if necessary, to ensure continued consistency between elements. Table of Contents Introduction to Policies and Program (2015-2023 Housing Element) .................................. i PublicParticipation.................................................................................................................... i Relationship to Other General Plan Elements....................................................................... ii Introduction............................................................................................................................. 39 Building Upon Past Successes................................................................................................ 40 HousingNeeds........................................................................................................................ 41 WhoNeeds Housing?............................................................................................................. 42 What Kind of Housing is Needed?........................................................................................ 42 Overview of Key Recommendations.................................................................................... 43 GOAL3: HOUSING NEEDS............................................................................................. 45 H-1. Housing Distribution......................................................................................................45 H-2. Design That Fits into the Neighborhood Context....................................................45 H-3. Public Information and Participation..........................................................................46 H-4. Governmental and Community Collaboration...........................................................47 H-5. Fair Housing.....................................................................................................................47 H-6. Funding for Affordable Housing..................................................................................48 GOAL 4: A DIVERSE HOUSING SUPPLY..................................................................... 49 H-7. Protection of the Existing Housing Stock..................................................................49 H-8. Housing Conditions and Maintenance........................................................................51 H-9. Special Needs...................................................................................................................52 H-10. Innovative Housing Approaches................................................................................53 H-11. House Sharing................................................................................................................53 H-12. Residential Care Facilities and Emergency Shelters................................................54 H-13. Senior Housing..............................................................................................................55 H-14. Adequate Sites................................................................................................................56 H-15. Infill Near Transit.........................................................................................................58 H-16. Second Units..................................................................................................................59 H-17. Regulatory Processes and Incentives for Affordable Housing..............................59 H-18. Inclusionary Housing Requirements..........................................................................60 H-19. Energy Conservation and Sustainability....................................................................61 Summary of Quantified Objectives....................................................................................... 62 IV Housing Introduction Nestled among hills on the edge of the San Francisco Bay, San Rafael is a wonderful place to call home. San Rafael is a great place to grow up, work, raise a family, and retire. It has a broad-based economy, a vibrant cultural life, and high quality educational opportunities. The city has a broad mix of incomes, ages, and cultures. San Rafael is a city with a long history and many neighborhoods that are distinctive and representative of that history. There are older neighborhoods, from the days when San Rafael's residences were a mix of large ornate homes for wealthy merchants, summer retreats for San Francisco residents, and smaller simpler homes for workers from other countries. Neighborhoods built before World War II were developed with narrow tree -lined streets, neighborhood stores, and homes with front porches. The larger suburbs built in the 1960s and 1970s, with three- and four- bedroom homes, tend toward a similarity in design, such as the Eichler -designed homes which strive to unify indoor spaces with the outdoors while maintaining privacy. More recently, attached housing, including condominiums, apartments, and townhomes, ranging in size from single rooms to four - bedrooms, has been located throughout the city. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, almost half of the housing is renter -occupied, over one-quarter of the households are families with children, another quarter are senior households, and a third of the households are people living alone. Trends show that today's seniors are growing into their 80s and beyond and there will be an increase in assisted living needs. Baby boomers and empty nesters will be relocating to smaller homes. Young adults in San Rafael, grown children of residents, new employees, and college graduates will want to set up their own households to stay close to their families or work. Consistent with the State of California's goal to provide "decent housing and a suitable living environment for every California family," and the City's vision to "provide housing for people at all stages of life, at all income levels " policies and programs preserve existing housing Our Use of Land Definitions Abatement — The removal or legalization of a condition in violation of City regulations. Affordability — The generally accepted banking/ government standard for determining whether a person can afford housing is defined as spending no more than 30 percent of one's gross monthly household income on housing costs, which for owner housing would include principal, interest, utilities and insurance. Below Market Rate Housing Programs — The term "below -market -rate" (BMR) housing is used to describe units offered at rents or sales prices below that which they could command on the open market. Co -Housing — A type of share housing arrangement. Co -housing developments have individual units with kitchens, combined with a common kitchen and meeting rooms. Illegal Unit — A unit built without required permits (building, electrical, plumbing). Inclusionary Requirements — These programs require a percentage of low and moderate income housing to be provided in market -rate new residential developments. Mixed Use — Properties on which various uses, such as office, commercial, institutional, and residential, are combined in a single building or on a single site in an integrated development project with significant functional interrelationships and a coherent physical design. Second Unit - A self-contained living unit either attached to or detached from, and in addition to, the primary residential unit on a single lot. Sometimes called "granny flat" or a "mother-in-law" unit. Junior second units refer to repurposed existing space (under 500 sq ft) within a single- family home to create an independent living unit. Single Room Occupancy (SRO) — One of the most traditional forms of affordable private housing for single and elderly low-income people and for new arrivals to an area. An SRO unit is usually small, between 80 and 250 square feet. It typically has a sink and a closet but shares a bathroom, shower, and kitchen with other rooms. and encourage new housing. With proactive City leadership, the activities of Community Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / HOUSING 39 Development and Economic Development Departments, and a community -wide partnership to implement housing programs, San Rafael will continue to be a leader in providing a variety of housing types to meet the diverse needs of its residents. Building Upon Past Successes The city of San Rafael is sensitive to the many converging and competing interests, desires and views in the city relating to development of housing, preservation of the character of San Rafael's neighborhoods, ease of getting around, and protection of environmentally sensitive areas. To encourage housing in the Downtown, General Plan incentives were adopted in 1988 and 1996 that: (1) allow height and density bonuses for affordable housing; (2) encourage mixed-use development by modifying development potential calculations; (3) reduce the parking requirement for downtown units; (4) provide live/work opportunities; and (5) provide for single -room occupancy units. As a means of further encouraging mixed use in commercial areas outside the Downtown, General Plan 2020 extends Downtown's modified development potential calculations throughout all commercial areas of the city. In addition, in 2001 the General Plan was amended to revise inclusionary requirements to better target new housing to very low- and low-income households. San Rafael supports the development and acquisition of affordable housing units by non- profit and for-profit developers. Since 1991, the former San Rafael Redevelopment Agency provided financial assistance that resulted in the long-term affordability of 840 affordable rental units. All of these units have ongoing affordability restrictions monitored by the City. Community Development and Economic Development staff works closely with housing advocates and developers to create financially viable projects. Financial support is available in a variety of forms, from loans and grants to tax credits and outright purchases. The Planning Commission and City Council have unanimously supported new housing development. Housing development in the past 25 years has provided a significant amount of affordable housing projects including Centertown, Maria B. Freitas Senior Housing, Lone Palm Apartments, Baypoint Lagoon and Ecology House. In addition, over these years many market rate residential projects have been developed that include a component of below-market rate units. These development projects include, among others, Redwood Village, Peacock Ridge, 33 North (San Pablo Avenue) and the Rafael Town Center. San Rafael's Economic Development Department tracks the "below market rate" units and ensures that they are providing housing for households of the targeted incomes. The City's inclusionary and density bonus policies, and the investment of the former Redevelopment Agency has resulted in over 1,400 affordable rental units and 113 ownership units representing about 25 percent of the new housing in San Rafael. In short, implementing San Rafael's housing policies is a team effort, grounded by General Plan policies and empowered by a vision that affordable units are an essential part of San Rafael's housing stock and maintaining its diverse population. The City continues to support a multi -faceted approach to housing that builds upon these successes, maximizes the chances for broad community consensus and fulfills the State of California's requirement that adequate housing potential exists to meet specified housing needs. 40 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / HOUSING Amended 1/13/2016 Housing Needs The lack of affordable housing has long been a top issue in San Rafael, with the City's existing and projected housing needs documented in the 2014 Housing Needs Assessment (refer to Appendix B-1). Both the 1974 and 1988 General Plans identified affordable (also known as workforce) housing as a vital community need. The topic was identified again as a top planning issue in the Trends Report (2000) and the Issues Report (2000) where community members ranked affordable housing as one of the top three issues facing San Rafael. High rents, employee recruitment and retention challenges, congestion on local highways and lengthening of commute time all result from a lack of affordable housing in San Rafael. A detailed examination of San Rafael's housing need, housing supply, cost of housing, population, household characteristics and quantified objectives to meet those needs is provided in Appendix B. There are five levels of affordability discussed in the Housing Element: • Extremely low income households earn less than 30 percent of the median household income. • Very low income households earn less than 50 percent of the median household income. • Low income households earn between 50 and 80 percent of the median household income. • Moderate income households earn between 80 and 120 percent of the median household income. • Above moderate income households earn more than 120 percent of the median household income. Table 1: Marin County Income Levels, 2014 MARIN COUNTY INCOME LEVELS, 2 0 1 4 Household incomes are described in terms of family size and are determined on an annual basis. The table above lists Marin County income levels for 2014, as determined by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. For example, using the table above, a family of three with an income below $81,450 would be considered a low-income household. The final column of the table identifies the median income levels in 2009 as presented in San Rafael's last Housing Element, and indicates a modest 6.4 percent increase in median incomes levels between 2009 and 2014. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / HOUSING 41 Extremely Low 2014 2009 House Income Very Low Income Low Income Moderate Income Median Median -hold (less than 30% (less than 50% (50 - 80% (80 - 120% Income Income Size median income) median income) median income) median income) 1 $23,750 and below $23,751- $39,600 $39,601 $63,350 $63,351 $88,500 $72,100 $67,750 2 $27,150 and below $27,151- $45,250 $45,251 $72,400 $72,401 $98,900 $82,400 $77,450 3 $30,550 and below $30,551- $50,900 $50,901 - $81,450 $81,451 $111,250 $92,700 $87,100 4 $33,950 and below $33,951- $56,550 $56,551 - $90,500 $90,501 - $123,600 $103,000 $96,800 5 $36,650 and below $36,651- $61,050 $61,051 $97,700 $97,701 $133,500 $104,951 $143,400 $111,250 $104,550 6 $39,400 and below $39,401- $65,600 $65,601 $104,950 $119,500 $112,300 Household incomes are described in terms of family size and are determined on an annual basis. The table above lists Marin County income levels for 2014, as determined by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. For example, using the table above, a family of three with an income below $81,450 would be considered a low-income household. The final column of the table identifies the median income levels in 2009 as presented in San Rafael's last Housing Element, and indicates a modest 6.4 percent increase in median incomes levels between 2009 and 2014. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / HOUSING 41 Who Needs Housing? • Low- and moderate -income families living in overcrowded housing where families double up, or larger families living in one and two-bedroom apartments. • Seniors with very low and low incomes, living primarily off of SSI benefits, and perhaps some retirement savings. Many own their own house, some live alone. Not all have the resources to maintain their house, and some may need to live closer to services. • Students at Dominican University and College of Marin, and young adults in local businesses. • Employees in local businesses, commuting on Highway 101 or 1-580. People who live in the community where they work do not have a lengthy commute. • Very low income households, including those without a place to call home. • People with disabilities who have specific design or service considerations, such as wheelchair -accessible apartments or group homes with semi-independent living. What Kind of Housing is Needed? • Rental units, particularly Single Room Occupancy Units and studios affordable to those with low and very low incomes, and two or more bedroom units affordable to moderate and below income households. • Ownership family units. • Smaller and attached for -sale units affordable to very low, low, and moderate income households. • Senior housing affordable to very low, low, and moderate income households. • Second units and junior second units (repurposing existing space such as the conversion of a bedroom to a small, independent unit) which would encourage seniors to remain in their homes. • Housing with a service component. • Emergency Housing One unique aspect of the State's Housing Element law is the assistance provided to local governments in quantifying housing needs. Under California law, every city and county has a legal obligation to respond to its fair share of the projected future housing needs in the region in which it is located. For San Rafael and other Bay Area jurisdictions, the regional housing need is determined by the Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG), based upon an overall regional need number established by the State. The fair share numbers establish goals to guide local planning and development decision-making. Housing needs are described in terms of affordability to various household incomes. The ABAG Regional Housing Needs Allocation (RHNA) for San Rafael call for a demonstrated planning capacity total of 1,007 housing units between January 1, 2014 and October 31, 2022 (see Exhibit 14). San Rafael must demonstrate that adequate provisions are made to support the development of housing at the various income levels to meet its fair share of the projected regional housing needs. San Rafael's housing objective is based on the identified housing needs for San Rafael. Between January 2014 and July 2014, of projects that include 3 or more units, 19 units have received planning entitlements or are under construction in San Rafael. There are two perspectives from which to understand the ABAG housing needs and how they relate to San Rafael's adequate sites analysis: 42 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / HOUSING Amended 1/13/2016 • Are there adequate sites to meet the city's total housing needs? • Are there adequate sites at sufficient densities to meet the city's need for very low-, low - and moderate -income housing? Based on surveys of existing rents, second units and market rate apartments are generally affordable to moderate income households. The State assumes that a density of at least 30 units/acre is usually needed to create opportunities for very low- and low-income housing to be built. The density allows for savings in construction, long-term management and maintenance costs, as well as competitiveness for tax credit financing and land costs. Specific areas of San Rafael have been identified as potential housing opportunity sites (Appendix B). In addition to addressing the ABAG housing needs requirements, General Plan 2020 looks at the housing for San Rafael in the longer-term. Overview of Key Recommendations San Rafael's housing strategies are to: • Preserve and strengthen San Rafael's neighborhoods so that they continue to improve over time. • Be proactive in new housing so that changes continue to enhance San Rafael, making it an ever -increasingly attractive place to live. • Target resources for effective partnerships involving property owners, developers, neighborhoods, businesses, civic and service organizations, and the County to address housing needs. • Foster land use patterns and densities which support lifestyles which rely less on carbon - based transportation. The City's strong commitment to meeting the needs for affordable housing is demonstrated through permit streamlining, financial support, and community involvement. Housing policies are written so that affordable housing is targeted to a variety of economic levels, integrated into projects and dispersed throughout the community. Support is also provided by elected officials and members of the business community who understand the critical role affordable housing has in making San Rafael a balanced and healthy community. Because San Rafael has little remaining vacant land available for large-scale development, building on smaller or under-utilized sites scattered throughout the city will be important in meeting its housing needs. These "infill" sites must be developed in a way that best adds value to a neighborhood. Encouraging new housing development at appropriate densities, promoting mixed -uses where housing can be incorporated into areas of commercial -only or industrial -only uses, and supporting continued development of second units will help make better use of our land resources and to address San Rafael's housing needs. Housing policies must be integrated with related issues such as land use, design, traffic capacity, economic development, and adequate infrastructure. For example, design policies for multifamily housing will try to ensure enhancement of neighborhood identity and sense of community by having new housing sensitively address scale and compatibility in design to the surrounding neighborhood. Linkages with land use strategies that encourage use of transit are also supported in housing policies. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / HOUSING 43 Table 2: San Rafael's Regional Housing Need San Rafael's Regional Housing Need By Household Income, 2 0 1 5 - 2 0 2 3 * Extremely low income household need is a subset of very low income household need. The major actions proposed are to: • Continue the City's proactive role in protecting existing housing and assuring that new housing continues to enhance the city's diversity, economy, and quality of life. • Broaden affordability requirements in new housing developments. Establish higher percentages of affordable units when traffic allocation and density bonuses are requested. • Require new nonresidential development to contribute to the production of affordable housing, such as providing housing on- or off-site, subsidizing mortgages and/or rents, and payment of in -lieu fees. • Support housing development either as redevelopment or infill to improve certain areas of town. • Encourage second units as a means of dispersing small, affordable units throughout the community by modifying zoning regulations and processing requirements. Promote creation of junior second units through the repurposing of existing space in single-family homes as independent rental units. • Require that illegal units are abated/removed or legalized. • Expand allowances for mixed-use and infill housing development in commercial areas in order to create housing near workplaces. • Encourage development at higher densities within easy walking distance to transit where reduced automobile usage and parking requirements are possible. • Continue to support housing for population groups who require special assistance, such as homeless persons, people living with disabilities, seniors, large families, and single -parent households. 44 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / HOUSING Amended 1/13/2016 Above Very Low Moderate Moderate Average Housing Income Low Income Income Income Yearly Need Households Households Households Households Need 240 1,007 Extremely 148 181 438 125 low income*: 120 * Extremely low income household need is a subset of very low income household need. The major actions proposed are to: • Continue the City's proactive role in protecting existing housing and assuring that new housing continues to enhance the city's diversity, economy, and quality of life. • Broaden affordability requirements in new housing developments. Establish higher percentages of affordable units when traffic allocation and density bonuses are requested. • Require new nonresidential development to contribute to the production of affordable housing, such as providing housing on- or off-site, subsidizing mortgages and/or rents, and payment of in -lieu fees. • Support housing development either as redevelopment or infill to improve certain areas of town. • Encourage second units as a means of dispersing small, affordable units throughout the community by modifying zoning regulations and processing requirements. Promote creation of junior second units through the repurposing of existing space in single-family homes as independent rental units. • Require that illegal units are abated/removed or legalized. • Expand allowances for mixed-use and infill housing development in commercial areas in order to create housing near workplaces. • Encourage development at higher densities within easy walking distance to transit where reduced automobile usage and parking requirements are possible. • Continue to support housing for population groups who require special assistance, such as homeless persons, people living with disabilities, seniors, large families, and single -parent households. 44 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / HOUSING Amended 1/13/2016 GOAL 3: HOUSING NEEDS It is the goal of San Rafael to have a strong sense of community and responsibility in meeting housing needs. Historically, San Rafael has provided housing of all types to meet the varied needs of 'its population in settings that enhance the feeling of community. It is important to enhance our sense of community by identifying responsibilities of all sectors within the community (neighborhoods, business, non -profits, government, etc.) to effectively address the city's housing needs and to assure effective application of Fair Housing laws. The intent in this approach is to continue to be purposeful and creative in finding ways to increase local funding resources and/or financially equivalent incentives for lower income and special needs housing, and to take a proactive approach in creating and responding to opportunities to achieve San Rafael's housing goals. New development must be compatible with and enhance existing community character. San Rafael residents at the 2020 Visioning session stated that maintaining community diversity is one of their highest priorities. The City's policies encompass two approaches. The first is that the City and its neighborhoods share a responsibility in helping to meet housing needs; investment in new housing and improvements should be distributed throughout the city. Second, new housing development must recognize and enhance the design character of the surrounding neighborhood. In the end, future development is planned based on community wide needs, sound citywide policies, neighborhood involvement, capital improvements, and public facility and service capacity. H-1. Housing Distribution. Promote the distribution of new and affordable housing of quality construction throughout the city to meet local housing needs. H -la. Annual Housing Element Review. Provide an annual Housing Element progress report for review by the public and City decision -makers. The Report will document: • San Rafael's annual residential building activity, including identification of any deed restricted affordable units; • Progress towards the Regional Housing Needs Allocation since the start of the planning period; and • Implementation status of Housing Element programs Responsibility: Community Development, Economic Development Timeframe: Annually Resources: Fees H-2. Design That Fits into the Neighborhood Context. Recognize that construction of new housing and improvements on existing properties can add to the appearance and value of the neighborhood if they fit into the established character of the area. Design new housing, remodels, and additions to be compatible to the surrounding neighborhood. Incorporate transitions in height and setbacks from adjacent properties to respect adjacent development character and privacy. Respect existing landforms and minimize effects on adjacent properties. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / HOUSING 45 H -2a. Design Concerns of Single -Family Homes. Examine and amend, as needed, zoning regulations and guidelines for single-family homes to address concerns about bulk, height, setbacks privacy, and other impacts of new homes and of additions to existing homes. Consider potential cost impacts on housing development when developing new regulations and guidelines. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Mid Term (2017) Resources: Staff Time H -2b. Compatibility of Building Patterns. Adopt design guidelines to ensure compatibility of neighborhood building patterns. Guidelines may address setback patterns, garage and driveway patterns, and building scale. Further develop the character -defining elements of the neighborhood. Guidelines may address entries, roof design, windows, architectural style, materials, and detailing. Consider potential cost impacts on housing development when developing new regulations and guidelines. The City is currently operating under interim design guidelines adopted with the 2020 General Plan, which has been providing direction to the development community. Program Objective: Adopt Residential and Mixed Use Development Design Guidelines Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Mid Term (2017) Resources: Staff Time See LU -2a (Development Review) and CD -1 la (Compatibility of Building Patterns). H-3. Public Information and Participation. Provide information on housing programs and related issues. Require and support public participation in the formulation and review of the City's housing policy, including encouraging neighborhood involvement in development review. Work with community groups to advocate programs that will increase affordable housing supply and opportunities. Ensure appropriate and adequate involvement so that the design of new housing will strengthen the character and integrity of the neighborhood. H -3a. Neighborhood Meetings. Require neighborhood meetings, as provided for by the City Council resolution for Neighborhood Meeting Procedures, for larger housing development proposals and those that have potential to change neighborhood character. In larger projects, the City requests that developers participate in formal meetings with the community. The City facilitates outreach by helping applicants find information on the appropriate neighborhood groups to contact. City staff attends meetings as a staff resource and conducts noticing of meetings. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing (as part of project review) Resources: Fees H -3b. Information and Outreach on Housing Issues. Continue to provide information to improve awareness of housing needs, issues and programs, and to collaborate with housing organizations to publicize in-service training, press releases, fair housing laws, contacts, and phone numbers. For example, provide links on the Community Development webpage to housing resources, such as the State Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD). Responsibility: City Manager, Community Development, Economic Development Timeframe: Annually Resources: Fees See also CD -15a (Notification and Information about Development Projects) and G -7a (Review of Facilities Proposed by Other Public Agencies). 46 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / HOUSING Amended 1/13/2016 H-4. Governmental and Community Collaboration. Collaborate when possible with other jurisdictions in Marin County in addressing regional housing needs. Support community partnerships to assist in the development of needed housing and continue to provide technical assistance to owners, developers, and non -profits. Participate in local and regional housing assistance programs and establish relationships and coordinate with other public agencies, non-profit housing sponsors, and for-profit housing sponsors in the use of available programs and funding resources to provide lower-cost housing in San Rafael. Take leadership in attaining the goals of the Housing Element by coordinating with interested parties and carrying out prescribed actions in a timely manner. H -4a. Inter -Jurisdictional Housing Activities and Resources. Continue to implement shared responsibilities, common regulations, coordinated lobbying efforts and the housing data clearinghouse to efficiently and effectively respond to housing needs within the cities and county of Marin. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees H -4b. Community Collaboration. Encourage cooperative and joint ventures between owners, developers, and community non-profit groups in the provision of affordable housing. Give technical assistance to non-profit developers by providing information on other local sources of funding for affordable housing and introductions to other funders. As appropriate, write letters of support and serve as a co -applicant for project funding, such as for affordable housing funds available through California's cap -and -trade system. Work with businesses, public agencies, and local school districts to seek opportunities to help employees find local housing. Responsibility: Community Development, Economic Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees, Staff Time See also H -6c (Funding Applications). H-5. Fair Housing Take action when necessary to prevent discrimination on the basis of race, religion, sex, marital status, ancestry, national origin, color, familial status or disability in San Rafael's housing market. H -5a. Fair Housing Program. Designate the Community Development Director as the Equal Opportunity Coordinator in San Rafael. Ensure that written materials regarding fair housing law are provided at various public locations, and that information about fair housing agencies and phone numbers is posted in places such as the City's website, at City Hall, the Public Library, and other public places. As part of the Cooperative Agreement with the County on CDBG funding, continue to require a portion of the City's allocation be directed to Fair Housing of Marin and/or other fair housing organizations. Continue to refer discrimination and tenant/landlord complaints to Fair Housing of Marin, or the appropriate legal service, county, state, or federal agency. Responsibility: Community Development, Economic Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / HOUSING 47 H-6- Fundina fnr Affordable Housing. Given the loss of Redevelopment funds, combined with reductions in federal housing funding, the City's ability to directly finance affordable housing is significantly diminished. San Rafael's primary tool to support the development of affordable housing is through its Affordable Housing Ordinance, which produces both affordable units and generates in -lieu fees. The City will continue to actively pursue outside funding sources to leverage local funds and maximize assistance. In addition to applying for those funds directly available to municipalities, the City plays an important role in supporting developers to secure outside funds. H -6a. In -Lieu Fees for Affordable Housing. Affordable Housing In -Lieu Fees generated from non-residential development and fees generated from residential developments pursuant to San Rafael Zoning Code Section 14.16.030 are placed in a citywide housing in -lieu fee fund to be used to increase the supply of housing affordable to very low, low, and moderate income households. As of the end of fiscal year 2013/14, San Rafael's Housing In -Lieu Fee Fund has a current balance of approximately $1.2 million, with an estimated $100,000 in additional fees which could be generated during the planning period. Given this relatively limited amount of funding, the City will focus these resources on projects which emphasize leverage with outside funds and maximize the number and affordability of units provided. Funded activities may include: acquisition and rehabilitation of existing housing through non -profits; new construction of affordable housing; and provision of rehabilitation funds to privately owned rental housing in exchange for affordability covenants. Pursuant to State Law, the City will dedicate a portion of these in lieu fees for housing for extremely low and very low income households. Program Objective: Contribute funding towards at least one affordable rental project for lower income households. Responsibility: Community Development, Economic Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Housing in -lieu fees H -6b. Funding Resources. Work with community and elected leaders to identify potential public and private funding resources for affordable housing funds. Program Objective: Seek to secure at least two new funding sources and a minimum of $200,000 in outside funds during the planning period. Responsibility: Economic Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time H -6c. Funding Applications. As opportunities for funding become available, coordinate applications for State and Federal subsidies for affordable housing, and (1) provide technical assistance in public funding resources and local processing requirements, including community involvement; (2) consider project funding and timing needs in the processing and review of the application; and (3) work with applicants to identify appropriate submittal materials to enable a timely determination of application completeness. Responsibility: Community Development, Economic Development Timeframe: Annually Resources: Fees 48 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / HOUSING Amended 1/13/2016 GOAL 4: A DIVERSE HOUSING SUPPLY It is the goal of San Rafael to have an adequate housing supply and mix that matches the needs of people of all ages, income levels, and special requirements. San Rafael has a wide range of housing types. People who work in San Rafael should be able to live here and there should be adequate housing for seniors and very low- ineome households. The present housing situation in San Rafael effectively limits the right to shelter to the well- to-do, and limits opportunities for seniors and young adults to remain in their community. It limits the ability of teachers and other public service employees, people who work in local businesses and people who provide childcare and elder care to find housing so that they can live in the community where they work. More housing choices can be created through mixed-use housing, shared housing, live -work units, higher density housing close to public transit and services, and sensitive development of unused or underutilized lands. Revisions made to California State law in 2003 make it easier for single-family property owners to add a second unit. At the same time, the City will continue to pursue abatement of illegal units — units built without required building permits. The City will assist property owners in legalizing units where feasible. Protection and Maintenance of Existing Housing H-7. Protection of the Existing Housing Stock. Continue to protect existing housing from conversion to nonresidential uses. Ensure that affordable housing provided through government subsidy programs, incentives, and deed restrictions remains affordable over the required time period, and intervene when possible to help preserve such housing. H -7a. Condominium Conversion Ordinance. As stated in the zoning ordinance, prohibit conversion of existing multifamily rental units to market rate condominium units unless the city's rental vacancy rate is above 5.0 percent, as determined by the State of California Finance Department annual Population Estimates. Exceptions include limited equity cooperatives, co -housing, and other innovative housing proposals that are affordable to low- and moderate -income households. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing (as part of project review) Resources: Staff Time Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / HOUSING 49 H -7b. Preserving Existing Rental Housing Affordable to Low Income Households At Risk of Conversion. Eight assisted rental projects in San Rafael (totaling 291 units) are technically at -risk of conversion to market rate prior to 2025. However, all eight projects are owned and managed by non-profit organizations with a public purpose to maintain affordable housing for low income and special needs populations. The majority of these developments receive Federal and State funding, rather than local funding, and therefore are not subject to the City's rent and income monitoring requirements. The City will however monitor each project's potential affordability expiration, and contact the non- profit owners within one year of the expiration date to address any future loss of funding which may put these units at risk. Program Objective: Conservation of all 291 very low income rental units as affordable Responsibility: Economic Development, Community Development Timeframe: Contact non-profit owners within one year of potential affordability expiration. Resources: State funding, City in -lieu funds and Successor Agency affordable housing funds. H -7c. Preserving Existing Rental Housing Affordable to Low Income Households through Ongoing Affordability Restrictions. The City of San Rafael and the former Redevelopment Agency is responsible for the annual monitoring of over 1,400 units in forty one publicly and privately owned rental developments. In addition, City policies have resulted in the development of 115 affordable ownership units. All of these rental and ownership units have long term affordability covenants. Program Objective: For units owned by non- profit agencies, continue to monitor these units as required by the original funding source (State, Federal or Redevelopment Agency). For private units produced pursuant to City inclusionary requirements, continue to monitor through annual income and rent certificate from property owners. Responsibility: Economic Development Timeframe: Annual rent and income certification Resources: Annual reporting fees, City in -lieu funds and Successor Agency affordable housing funds See also H -17c (Waiver or Reduction of Fees). H -7d. BMR Resale Regulations. Continue to require resale controls on ownership Below Market Rate (BMR) units to assure that units remain affordable to very low, low, and moderate -income households. Continue to monitor database with Marin Housing. Responsibility: Economic Development Timeframe: Annually, affordable housing funds and City in -lieu fees Resources: Successor Agency Funds H -7e. Retention of Mobilehomes and Preservation of Existing Mobilehome Sites. Retain where possible this type of housing, which includes the 400 -home Contempo Marin and the 30 -home B -Bar -A mobilehome park, and its affordability by continuing to implement the Mobilehome Rent Stabilization Ordinance. Mobilehomes typically provide lower cost housing by the nature of their size and design. Responsibility: City Attorney Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time 50 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / HOUSING Amended 1/13/2016 H-8. Housing Conditions and Maintenance. Protect and conserve the existing housing stock and existing residential areas. Protect residents and maintain the housing stock by enforcing the housing code for all types of residential units. Support good management practices and the long-term maintenance and improvement of existing housing. H -8a. Apartment Inspection Program. To assure safe living conditions, continue to enforce housing codes for all apartment projects, three units or larger in size. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Inspect all apartment units in the city every 5 years Resources: Fees H -8b. Code Enforcement and Public Information Programs. Coordinate housing, building and fire code enforcement to ensure compliance with basic health and safety building standards and provide information about rehabilitation loan programs for use by qualifying property owners. Continue to investigate reported illegal units and abate or legalize where possible units built without permits or occupied in violation of San Rafael's ordinances. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Bi -weekly meetings of the Development Coordinating Committee Resources: Staff Time H -8c. Residential Rehabilitation Loan Program. As part of the Cooperative Agreement with the County on CDBG funding, continue to require a portion of the City's allocation be directed to the Marin Housing Authority to provide property improvement loans and technical assistance to qualified very -low-income homeowners to make basic repairs and improvements, correct substandard conditions, and eliminate health and safety hazards. Continue to advertise the Rehabilitation Program on the City's website, and disseminate program brochures at City Hall. Program Objective: Rehabilitation assistance to 3 very low income households annually, subject to funding availability. Responsibility: Economic Development Timeframe: Annual through the CDBG funding allocation process Resources: Grants (Community Development Block Grant) H -8d. Relocation Assistance. Require applicants to provide certain limited relocation assistance, per Section 14.16.279, for low-income tenants displaced by new development or property improvements such as unit renovation or rehabilitation that results in the vacancy of the unit, including referring tenants to Marin Housing and providing cash compensation. Require notice of displacement to be distributed at least 60 days before the property is to be vacated. Responsibility: Community Development, Economic Development Timeframe: Ongoing (as part of project review) Resources: Staff Time Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / HOUSING 51 Variety of Housing Choices for a Diverse Population Many members of the community cannot occupy or afford traditional ownership and rental units. Alternative housing options are needed to maintain diversity and to provide safe shelter to all members of the community. H-9. Special Needs. Encourage a mix of housing unit types throughout San Rafael, including very low- and low- income housing for families with children, single parents, students, young families, lower income seniors, homeless and the disabled. Accessible units shall be provided in multi -family developments, consistent with State and Federal law. H -9a. Adaptive Housing. Ensure compliance with State and Federal requirements for accessible units. Conduct regular "coffee and codes" meetings with design and construction industry members to discuss requirements under the Americans with Disabilities (ADA) Act. An average of 2-3 meetings are held per year, consisting of simplified explanations of technical information and a range of topics aimed at clarifying development standards. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees H -9b. Reasonable Accommodation. Encourage and facilitate the provision of housing for persons with disabilities. Implement zoning regulations to provide individuals with disabilities reasonable accommodation in rules, policies, practices, and procedures that may be necessary to ensure equal access to housing. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time H -9c. Housing Opportunities for Persons Living with Disabilities: The Golden Gate Regional Center (GGRC) provides services and support for adults and children with developmental disabilities, including over 400 San Rafael residents. The GGRC reports that 60 percent of their adult clients with developmental disabilities live with their parents, and as these parents age and become frailer their adult disabled children will require alternative housing options. The City will coordinate with the GGRC to implement an outreach program informing San Rafael families of housing and services available for persons with developmental disabilities, including making information available on the City's website. Program Objective: Disseminate information on resources available to persons with developmental disabilities. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: 2015 Resources: Staff Time H -9d. Housing for Extremely Low Income Households. To meet the needs of extremely low income households, prioritize some housing fees for the development of housing affordable to extremely low-income households, to encourage the development of programs to assist age -in-place seniors, to increase the amount of senior housing, to increase the production of second units, and to facilitate the construction of multifamily and supportive housing. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Annually Resources: City in -lieu funds and Successor Agency affordable housing funds 52 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / HOUSING Amended 1/13/2016 H-10. Innovative Housing Approaches. Provide opportunities and facilitate innovative housing approaches in financing, design and construction of units to increase the availability of low- and moderate -income housing and especially for housing that meets the city's housing needs. Examples include: a. Limited Equity Cooperatives. Encourage limited equity residential cooperatives and other non-profit enterprises such as self-help projects designed to provide affordable housing. b. Manufactured Housing (Modular, Mobile homes). Allow, consistent with state law, creative, quality manufactured housing as a means for providing affordable housing. c. Single Room Occupancy (SRO) Units. Encourage construction of new SRO units and protection of the existing SRO unit supply. d. Live/Work Housing. This type of housing is intended for a resident and their business, typically on different floors of the same unit, and well suited to San Rafael's downtown. H -10a. Co -Housing, Cooperatives, and Similar Collaborative Housing Development. Provide zoning flexibility through Planned Development District zoning to allow housing development that is based on co -housing and similar approaches that feature housing units clustered around a common area and shared kitchen, dining, laundry, and day care facilities. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing (as part of project review) Resources: Fees See also LU -2a (Development Review). H -10b. Manufactured Housing. Continue to allow quality manufactured housing in all zoning districts which allow single-family residences. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing (as part of project review) Resources: Staff Time H -10c. Single Room Occupancy (SRO) Units. Actively promote existing incentives for SRO apartments, such as no density regulations and lower parking standards, in multifamily and mixed use districts in recognition of their small size and low impacts. Where needed, encourage linkages to social services. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees, Staff Time H -10d. Zoning for Live/Work Opportunities. Continue to accommodate live/work quarters in commercial districts, and allow for flexibility in parking requirements as supported by a parking study. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time H-11. House Sharing. Support organizations that facilitate house sharing, linking seniors and small households with potential boarders to more efficiently use existing housing stock. H -11a. Homesharing and Tenant Matching Opportunities. Continue to support, and consider increased participation in, the Shared Housing Project in collaboration with community partners. Responsibility: Community Development, Nonprofit Housing Providers, Social Service Organizations Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / HOUSING 53 H -11b. Junior Second Units. Monitor the "Junior Second Unit" provisions adopted in 2016 Coordinate with other"tarin julmi dietions i ,,luating iate zoning regulations support in -the creation of "Junior Second Units" of less than 500 square feet in size. Such units would be created through the repurposing of existing space within a single-family dwelling to create a semi -private living situation for a renter or caregiver in conjunction with the owner -occupied unit. Junior second units would be required to have exterior access, and meet the U.S. Census definition of a housing unit to qualify for credit towards the City's Regional Housing Needs Allocation (RHNA). Program Objective: Adept -Monitor standards adopted to facilitate junior second units. Seek to issue permits for at least 20 units during planning period. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Adopt Standards by 20 5On2oine_ . with initial two-vear review by 2018 Resources: Staff Time See also H -16a (Second Units) H-12. Residential Care Facilities and Emergency Shelters. Encourage a dispersion of residential care facilities and emergency shelters, and avoid an over concentration of residential care facilities and shelters for the homeless in any given area consistent with state and federal laws. Allow emergency shelter beds in appropriate zoning districts in order to accommodate San Rafael's unsheltered homeless population. Recognize transitional and supportive housing units as residential units, and eliminate governmental constraints to the operation or construction of transitional, supportive, and emergency housing consistent with State law. Support the implementation of the San Rafael Homeless Action Plan. H -12a. Countywide Efforts to Address Homeless Needs. Work with other jurisdictions and agencies in Marin to provide emergency, transitional, and supportive housing and assistance throughout Marin, and continue City staffs role as the homeless coordinator for the County. Continue to support and allocate funds, as appropriate, for programs providing emergency, supportive, and/or transitional shelter and counseling services for families and individuals who are homeless or at -risk of homelessness. Implement strategies identified in the San Rafael 2013 Homeless Action Plan to prevent homelessness to those who are precariouslv housed and provide a path to stable housim for those who are homeless. Responsibility: Community Development, Economic Development, Nonprofit Housing Providers, Marin Housing, County of Marin (funding) Timeframe: Ongoing (as part of project review) Resources: Staff Time H -12b. Good Neighborhood Relations Involving Emergency Shelters and Residential Care Facilities. Where determined necessary during review of an application, encourage positive relations between neighborhoods and providers of emergency shelters and residential care facilities by requiring shelter outreach communication programs with the neighborhoods. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: As part of project review Resources: Staff Time H -12c. Residential Care Facilities. Regularly update zoning regulations that govern residential care facilities to conform to Federal and State laws and to encourage their location in areas that do not result in overconcentration of care facilities. Explore the feasibility of requiring affordable units in assisted living facilities, for example, reduced rate rentals with access to market -rate services. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Mid Term (2018) Resources: Staff Time 1 The 2010 U.S. Census defines a "housing unit" as a house, an apartment, a mobile home, a group of homes, or a single room that is occupied (of if vacant, is intended for occupancy) as separate living quarters. Separate living quarters are those in which the occupants live and eat separately from any other persons in the building and which have direct access from the outside of the building or through a common hall. 54 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / HOUSING Amended 1/13/2016 H -12d. Emergency Shelters, Transitional and Supportive Housing. Implement Zoning Code Section 14.16.115 to allow emergency shelters as a permitted use in the General Commercial (GC) and Light Industrial (LI/O) zoning districts south of Bellam and east of Highway 580 and with appropriate performance standards as allowed by State law. Continue to allow emergency shelters with a use permit in areas zoned for office, commercial, light industrial and public/quasi-public use. Implement the City's Zoning Code (Zoning Code Chapter 14.03 - Definitions), consistent with State and Federal law, to recognize transitional and supportive housing as residential uses, subject to the same restrictions and standards of similar residential dwellings in the same zone. Based on input from State HCD, amend Zoning Code Section 14.16.115 to clarify requirements for staff and services to be provided to assist residents in obtaining permanent shelter and income are permissive, rather than mandatory. In addition, clarify that while a written Management Plan is required, it is not subject to discretionary approval. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Amend the Zoning Code in 2015 Resources: Staff Time See also H -5a (Fair Housing Program) H-13. Senior Housing. Encourage housing that meets the needs of San Rafael's older population, particularly affordable units and affordable care facilities that foster aging within the community. Support development that provides housing options so that seniors can find suitable housing to rent or purchase. H -13a. Assisted Living. Evaluate current zoning regulations for new assisted living housing, and assess options to regulate as a residential, rather than a commercial use. Evaluate establishing inclusionary housing requirements for assisted living. Program Objective: Undertake study of zoning for assisted living, and amend zoning ordinance accordingly. Responsibility: Community Development, Economic Development Timeframe: Mid Term (2018) Resources: Staff Time H -13b. "Age -in -Place" Assistance. Continue to provide assistance to older residents who want to remain independent and in their homes for as long as possible, such as the Police Department's "Are You OK?" program, the Fire Department's "Safety Check" program, Code Enforcement's continuing cooperation with the Marin County Social Services, and Community Services social activities offered through the Community Centers. Responsibility: Community Development, Police, Fire, Community Services Timeframe: Annually Resources: Staff Time, Grants, Partnerships with Community Partners See also H-1 lb (Junior Second Units) and H -16a (New Second Units) Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / HOUSING 55 Use Land Efficiently to Provide Affordable Housing San Rafael is a city with very little remaining vacant land, much of it in environmentally sensitive areas. The City of San Rafael has identified sites and areas as having the potential to provide housing to help meet local demand, as well as meet State law and regional need requirements. (See Housing Background, Appendix B.) This potential is based on the properties' availability for development, land use designations, size and other physical characteristics, and relative lack of environmental constraints. Each site may have unique issues pertaining to its neighborhood context that will need to be addressed during review of any development proposal. These issues are identified in site- specific policies in the Neighborhoods Element. The city's zoning capacity for housing is greater than the `total remaining need' listed below. These lands zoned for housing are available for development and sufficient to accommodate San Rafael's housing needs within the State's planning timeframe. H-14. Adequate Sites. Maintain an adequate supply of land designated for all types of residential development to meet the housing needs of all economic segments in San Rafael. Within this total, the City shall also maintain a sufficient supply of land for multifamily housing to meet the quantified housing need of very low, low, and moderate income housing units. Encourage development of residential uses in commercial areas where the vitality of the area will not be adversely affected and the site or area will be enhanced by linking workers to jobs, and by providing shared use of the site or area. H -14a. Residential and Mixed Use Sites Inventory. Encourage residential development in areas appropriate and feasible for new housing. These areas are identified in Appendix B, Housing Element Background, Summary of Potential Housing Sites (available for view on the City's website). Explore effective ways to share housing site information and developer and financing information to encourage development of underutilized institutional land. The City has employed different strategies to find the most effective way to deliver information about development. It is an ongoing and evolving process that has included practices such as preparing fact sheets for sites with multiple inquiries. Program Objective: Maintain a current inventory of suitable sites, and provide this information to interested developers along with information on incentives. Responsibility: Community Development, Economic Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time H -14b. Efficient Use of Multifamily Housing Sites. Do not approve residential -only development below minimum designated General Plan densities unless physical or environmental constraints preclude its achievement. Residential -only projects should be approved at the mid- to high -range of the zoning density. If development on a site is to occur over time the applicant must show that the proposed development does not prevent subsequent development of the site to its minimum density and provide guarantees that the remaining phases will, in fact, be developed. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing (as part of project review) Resources: Fees 56 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / HOUSING Amended 1/13/2016 H -14c. Continue to Implement Zoning Provisions to Encourage Mixed Use. San Rafael has been effective in integrating both vertical mixed use and higher density residential development within its Downtown. As a means of further encouraging mixed use in commercial areas outside the Downtown, General Plan 2020 now allows site development capacities to encompass the aggregate of the maximum residential density PLUS the maximum FAR for the site, thereby increasing development potential on mixed use sites. The City will continue to review development standards to facilitate mixed use, including: a. Encourage adaptive reuse of vacant buildings and underutilized sites with residential and mixed use development on retail, office, and appropriate industrial sites b. Explore zoning regulation incentives to encourage lot consolidation where needed to facilitate housing. c. Review zoning requirements for retail in a mixed use building or site, and amend the zoning ordinance as necessary to allow for residential -only buildings in appropriate mixed-use zoning districts. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Mid Term (2017) Resources: Staff Time See also H -15a (Downtown Station Area Plan). H -14d. Air Rights Development. Take an active role in evaluating the feasibility of air rights development and consider possible zoning incentives for such development. Encourage developers of affordable housing to utilize air rights, such as above public parking lots or commercial uses Downtown. Responsibility: Community Development, Public Works, Parking Services Timeframe: Long Term (2020) Resources: Fees Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / HOUSING 57 H-15. Infill Near Transit. Encourage higher densities on sites adjacent to a transit hub, focusing on the Priority Development Area surrounding the San Rafael Transportation Center and future Downtown SMART station. H -15a. Downtown Station Area Plan. The coming of SMART rail service to Downtown San Rafael in 2016 is an opportunity to build on the work that the City has undertaken to revitalize the Downtown and to create a variety of transportation and housing options, economic stability, and vibrant community gathering places in the heart of San Rafael. General Plan 2020, adopted in 2004, allowed for higher residential densities and reduced residential parking standards to encourage housing development within the heart of Downtown that would suppolocal rt businesses and allow people to live close to their place of work. The Downtown Station Area Plan, accepted by City Council in June 2012, establishes a series of implementing actions, the following of which specifically serve to facilitate higher density residential and mixed use infill in the area. ✓ Conduct parking study in Station Area to evaluate options to addressing small parcels and on-site parking constraints to development (study underway, complete in 2015). ✓ Evaluate relocation of existing Bettini Transit C enter, and potential reuse as mixed use site (study underway, complete in 2015). ✓ Evaluate additional height and FAR on certain blocks adjacent to US 101 (as defined in the Downtown Station Area Plan), facilitating redevelopment of the Transit Center into a vibrant, mixed use environment (long term). ✓ Evaluate allowing additional height and FAR increases in certain areas to match the adjacent height and FAR limits in exchange for community amenities. The blocks recommended for study are: A. West side of US 101 -Tamalpais Avenue to Hetherton Street between Mission Avenue and Second Streets, including the transit center; and B. On the east side of US 101 - The west side of Irwin Street between Fourth and Second Streets and the south side of Fourth Street between Irwin Street and Grand Avenue, and consider adopting a form based code instead of the current density and FAR requirement (long term). ✓ Review parking requirements and develop additional municipal parking resources to reduce onsite parking burden (long term). Program Objective: Complete Station Area parking study and Transit Center relocation analysis in 2015. Following the commencement of operation of SMART (2016), study other Station Area Plan recommendations to increase housing opportunities near transit, and implement through Zoning Code changes where appropriate. Build upon lessons learned from the Station Area parking analysis to re-evaluate parking standards on a citywide basis. Responsibility: Gom comity Develop eat arkine Services Timeframe: One year after the start of SMART services in the city. Resources: Staff Time, PDA Funding 58 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / HOUSING Amended 1/13/2016 H -15b. Civic Center Station Area Plan. The City completed the Civic Center Station Area Plan, which was accepted by the City Council in August 2012 and amended in 2013. Development around the station area will be guided by considerations for station access and transportation connections by various modes, as well as promotion of land uses that embrace the opportunities of a transit -oriented site and are compatible with the character of the surrounding area. Following the commencement of the operation of SMART (2016), study Station Area Plan recommendations to facilitate housing opportunities near transit, and implement through General Plan amendments and Zoning Code changes where appropriate. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: One year after the start of SMART operation in the city. Resources: Staff Time, PDA Funding H-16. Second Units. Second dwelling units offer several benefits. First, they typically rent for less than apartments of comparable size, and can offer affordable rental options for seniors and single persons. Second, the primary homeowner receives supplementary income by renting out the second unit, which can help many modest income and elderly homeowners afford to remain in their homes. San Rafael has continuously promoted second units as an affordable housing option. Efforts have included providing a comprehensive handout explaining the second -unit process, posting information about second units on the City's website, promoting the second unit program through the San Rafael Focus City newsletter, offering staff consultation for adding or legalizing a second unit, holding workshops to educate homeowners about the process to add a second unit, and implementing an amnesty program for legalization of illegal second units. In addition, San Rafael staff worked with local utility agencies to reduce fees for water and sewer service for second units, and in 2012 the City adopted a Citywide Traffic mitigation fee amendment to waive the traffic mitigation fee for second units. H -16a. New Second Units. Continue to encourage the provision of second units to provide housing options for seniors, caregivers, and other lower and extremely low income households. Program Objectives: Based on past trends, support the production of an average of five second units annually, with the goal of achieving 40 units over the planning period. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees See also H -I Ib (Junior Second Units). H-17. Regulatory Processes and Incentives for Affordable Housing. San Rafael implements a variety of regulatory processes to address potential governmental constraints and incentivize the provision of affordable housing, including density bonuses, height bonuses, fee waivers, and reduced parking requirements. San Rafael's primary tool to support the development of affordable housing is through its Affordable Housing Ordinance which both produces affordable units and generates affordable housing in -lieu fees. San Rafael was one of the first cities in the State to adopt such an affordable housing requirement in the 1980's. This policy has resulted in the construction of numerous affordable units within market rate developments and provided additional funding for 100% affordable developments. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / HOUSING 59 H -17a. State Density Bonus Law. Under Government Code section 65915-65918, for housing projects of at least five units cities must grant density bonuses ranging from 5% to 35% (depending on the affordability provided by the housing project) when requested by the project sponsor, and provide up to three incentives or concessions unless specific findings can be made. San Rafael has integrated State density bonus requirements within its Affordable Housing Ordinance (Zoning Code Section 14.16.030), depicting the connection with the City's Inclusionary Housing requirements. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing (as part of project review) Resources: Fees H -17b. Height Bonuses. Continue to offer height bonuses for projects that include affordable housing units as provided in Exhibit 10 of the Land Use Element. Provide early design review to assist with potential design issues. Height increases may be granted with a use permit. Evaluate utilizing height bonuses as a tool to incentivize lot consolidation. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Evaluate lot consolidation incentives by 2016. Resources: Staff Time H -17c. Waiver or Reduction of Fees. Continue to offer fee waivers and reductions for applications including affordable units, consistent with Resolution 11025. Facilitate the production of second units through elimination of the traffic mitigation fee (adopted in 2012), and coordination with local jurisdictions to lobby Las Gallinas Valley Sanitary District to reduce sewer connection fees for second units and affordable housing. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing (as part of project review) Resources: General Fund H -17d. Efficient Project Review. San Rafael has fully implemented the provisions of the Permit Streamlining Act (AB 884), and provides concurrent processing through over-the- counter one-stop permitting. Planning staff continue to inform developers of density bonus incentives for affordable housing, and consistent with State requirements, any modified development standards provided as part of a density bonus incentives package are exempt from the variance process. The City utilizes allowable California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) exemptions for qualified urban infill and other residential projects where site characteristics and an absence of potentially significant environmental impacts allow. Responsibility: Community Development, Economic Development Timeframe: Ongoing (as part of project review) Resources: Fees H-18. Inclusionary Housing Requirements. The City of San Rafael first adopted inclusionary requirements in the 1980's. The City requires residential projects to provide a percentage of affordable units on site and/or pay in -lieu of fees for the development of affordable units in another location. The City's program requires the units remain affordable for the longest feasible time, or at least 55 years. The City's primary intent is the construction of units on-site. The units should be of a similar mix and type to that of the development as a whole, and dispersed throughout the development. If this is not practical or not permitted by law, the City will consider other alternatives of equal value, such as in -lieu fees, construction of units off-site, donation of a portion of the property for future non-profit housing development, etc. Allow for flexibility in providing affordable units as long as the intent of this policy is met. Specific requirements are: 60 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / HOUSING Amended 1/13/2016 Table 3. Inclusionary Requirement by Project and Size. Project Size % Affordable Units Req'd 2 — 10 Housing Units* 10% 11 — 20 Housing Units 15% 21+ Housing Units 20% * Exemptions for smaller projects units may be provided for in the Zoning Ordinance. Rental Units. Provide, consistent with State law, a minimum of 50% of the BMR units affordable to very low-income households at below 50% of median income, with the remainder affordable to low income households at 50-80% of median income. Sale/Ownership Units. Provide a minimum of 50% of the BMR units affordable to low income households at 50-80% of median income, with the remainder affordable to moderate income households at 80-120% of median income. Calculation of In -lieu Fee. Continue to provide a calculation for in -lieu fees for affordable housing. For fractions of affordable units, if 0.5 or more of a unit, the developer shall construct the next higher whole number of affordable units, and if less than 0.5 of a unit, the developer shall provide an in -lieu fee. H -18a. Inclusionary Housing Nexus Study. Conduct an Inclusionary Housing Nexus Study and engage with the local development community and affordable housing advocates to evaluate the Inclusionary Housing Ordinance and in -lieu fee requirements for effectiveness in providing affordable housing under current market conditions. Amend the Inclusionary Housing Ordinance as appropriate, to enhance the Program's effectiveness and consistent with recent court decisions. Program Objective: Conduct affordable housing nexus study and amend the Inclusionary Housing Program as warranted. Responsibility: Community Development, Economic Development Timeframe: 2016 Resources: Fees, Staff Time H-79. Energy Conservation and Sustainability The City of San Rafael promotes resource conservation and energy efficiency through the Sustainability Element of the General Plan. In implementing the policies and programs of the Sustainability Element, the City will also achieve its objectives for greater sustainability in residential projects. H -19a. Sustainability Policies and Programs. Refer to the Sustainability Element in the San Rafael General Plan to guide housing development and renovation. SU -4a Renewable Energy lays out programs to increase the supply of renewable energy. SU -5a Reduce Use of Non -Renewable Resources promotes efficiency in resource consumption. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff time Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / HOUSING 61 Summary of Quantified Objectives The following table summarizes the City's quantified objectives for the 2015-2023 Housing Element planning period. The objectives include the City's new construction objectives to meet its Regional Housing Needs Allocation (RHNA); rehabilitation objectives to reflect Marin Housing's Rehabilitation Loan Program; and conservation objectives to reflect preservation of existing rent -restricted affordable housing at risk of conversion. Table 4: Quantified Objectives Income Level New Construction Rehabilitation Conservation Objectives** Objectives*** Objectives**** Extremely Low* (0% - 30% AMI) 120 6 291 Very Low (31% - 50% AMI) 120 18 Low 148 (51% - 80% AMI) Moderate 181 (81% - 120% AMI) Above Moderate 438 (>120% AMI) Totals 1,007 24 291 * Of San Rafael's RHNA allocation for 240 very low income units, half is allocated to extremely low income households, and half to very low income households. ** New Construction objectives reflect RHNA for the 2015-2023 planning period. *** Rehabilitation objectives are based on a goal to assist three households annually through Marin Housing's Rehabilitation Loan Program. **** Conservation objectives reflect preservation of 291 at -risk rent -restricted units in eight publicly - assisted projects owned by non -profits. 62 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / HOUSING Amended 1/13/2016 Neighborhoods Introduction San Rafael is a city of neighborhoods. Each neighborhood is one of the basic social units and physical building blocks of San Rafael. Surrounded by great natural beauty, San Rafael's neighborhoods form a quilt of homes, shops, churches, schools and parks that together create the distinct character of the overall city. With respect for the legacy of each neighborhood, the policies and programs below are intended to encourage safe neighborhoods, excellent schools, diverse and well-maintained housing, friendly streets, investment in desired changes, convenient access to goods and services, and protection of natural resources. The City of San Rafael has been planning for and improving neighborhoods since the 1970s. The 1974 General Plan called for a neighborhood planning process in response to changes in some of San Rafael's neighborhoods during the 1960s. Plans have been prepared for nine San Rafael neighborhoods. This element merges the best parts of the existing neighborhood plans in order to create general policies applicable to all San Rafael neighborhoods while at the same time creating specific policies for each neighborhood. Existing neighborhood plans include the following: • Gerstle Park (1979) • Neighborhood 13/14 [SunValley/Fairhills] (1980) • Peacock Gap (1980) • Northgate Activity Center (1982) • East San Rafael (1991) • Our Vision of Downtown (1993) • Montecito/Happy Valley (1996) • Canal Voice (1996) • Vision North San Rafael (1997) Sources for Neighborhood Element policies includet neighborhood policies in General Plan 2000, policy recommendations from General Plan Task Group work in 2001, policies from individual neighborhood plans, policy statements and ideas from Vision North San Rafael and Canal Voice, and policy suggestions from neighborhood organizations and the Chamber of Commerce. Our Use of Land N e i g h b o r h o o d Plans A neighborhood plan is a process where there is a place at the table for everyone with an interest in the area, including residents (renters and owners), merchants, and people from the neighborhood institutions. Together, participants develop shared values, decide what to keep and what to change, and develop a plan to shape the economic, social and physical environment in which they live. Many of the issues in San Rafael's neighborhoods are addressed in this element, yet many concerns are citywide. For example, traffic and parking, design, and housing are topics of interest throughout the city. To reduce the number of duplicated policies, citywide concerns are addressed through policies in the appropriate element, such as Circulation, Community Design, and Housing. However, where there is an issue specific to a neighborhood and a current policy speaks to that issue, the neighborhood -specific policy is included in this element. The City has, as long-standing principle, believed that future residential development should be harmoniously integrated within existing neighborhoods, and that existing Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS 63 housing should be protected and conserved. San Rafael's neighborhood policies are not intended to maintain the status quo, but to foster those actions that will make the neighborhoods more attractive and livable places. By choosing change for the better, the City can take advantage of opportunities to improve neighborhoods. In most neighborhoods, only a small amount of change is anticipated, in others residents expect some change to make the neighborhood a better place than it's been, and in some areas, such as along the Canal and waterfront, residents expect significant improvements. In San Rafael, no neighborhood is an island. For example, the shops for one area may be in the neighborhood next door, the playing fields may be on the other side of the hill, or the class may be across town. In visiting a friend in another area, eating at a restaurant in a nearby neighborhood, or going to church in another part of town, each resident in San Rafael shares in the richness of city life. Simply, the livability of San Rafael as a whole depends on the vitality of each neighborhood. Policies applicable to neighborhoods throughout the city appear first in this element. Following the citywide policies are policies for Downtown, a neighborhood that belongs to all who live in San Rafael, and policies for neighborhoods in the rest of the City. Neighborhoods are included in alphabetical order. Each has a brief description about the neighborhood's character and vision of the future. Many have policies addressing specific topics of interest to the neighborhood. Neighborhood policies are organized around four main topics. Because many of San Rafael's neighborhoods are quite small, not all four topics are discussed for each neighborhood. The topic areas are: Neighborhood Homes includes policies for issues related to where families and friends gather, owners and renters live their lives, and residents display their identities. Neighborhood Circulation includes policies for streets, sidewalks, and pedestrian safety and activity. Neighborhood Economy and Culture includes policies for educational, religious and cultural places where community life is enhanced. Policies for commercial uses are also in this section. Neighborhood Design includes policies on public places and open spaces, parks, gardens and gathering places. Where neighborhood policies are not listed, citywide policies apply. Additional policies on housing, local businesses, environmental protection, traffic, and design found in other elements should be consulted as well. 64 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS Amended 1/13/2016 3 �.H.xf S c�e-am sem. bl cro N Sen w bW is ml resp -W p "fable +a use rtsinfe.�eaa ourwse. 22 lk\% 24 12 a n P a b l o B a y 1 p 7 4i S a n R a f a e l B a y Exhibit 16 San Rafael Neighborhoods 1. Bay Islands 2. Lucas Valley 3. Marinwood 4. Canal waterfront 5. Terra Linda 6. Mont Marin/San Rafael Park 7. North San Rafael Commercial Center 8. Smith Ranch 9. Rafael Meadows/Los Ranchitos 10. Civic Center 11. Santa Venetia 12. China Camp 13. Sun Valley 14. Fairhills 15. Lincoln/San Rafael Hill 16. Domincan/Black Canyon 17. Country Club 18. Loch Lomond 19. Bayside Acres 20. Glenwood 21. Peacock Gap 22. West End 23. Downtown 24. Montecito/Happy Valley 25. Gerstle Park 26. Picnic Valley 27. Francisco Boulevard West 28. Bret Harte 29. California Park 30. Canal 0 500 100p 1500 Meters L— A 1 Miles GOAL 5: DISTINCTIVE NEIGHBORHOODS It is the goal for San Rafael to have neighborhoods of integrity and distinctive hometown character. San Rafael is a city of neighborhoods that support each other and provide a network of parks, gathering places and services. The unique identity, distinctive design and upkeep of each neighborhood will continue to be a source of pride. Each of San Rafael's neighborhoods is unique in its character, design and physical amenities, and each contributes to the diversity and vitality of the city. This uniqueness should be celebrated and preserved, but opportunities should also be taken to enhance these qualities when possible. Only through active partnerships among residents, property owners and the City can effective neighborhood planning occur and common issues be addressed. NH -1. Neighborhood Planning. Engage neighborhood associations in preparing neighborhood plans for their area. NH -la. Neighborhood Planning Process. Develop a neighborhood planning process where there is significant desire or need for a neighborhood plan. As of July, 2003, neighborhoods expressing a desire for a neighborhood plan are Bret Harte, Gerstle Park, Lincoln/San Rafael Hill, the Santa Margarita area in the Terra Linda neighborhood and the Canal. Responsibility: Community Development Timing: Short Term (priorities to be determined by Council) Resources: Staff Time, Partnerships Neighborhood Homes NH -2. New Development in Residential Neighborhoods. Preserve, enhance and maintain the residential character of neighborhoods to make them desirable places to live. New development should: • Enhance neighborhood image and quality of life, • Incorporate sensitive transitions in height and setbacks from adjacent properties to respect adjacent development character and privacy, • Preserve historic and architecturally significant structures, • Respect existing landforms and natural features, • Maintain or enhance infrastructure service levels, and • Provide adequate parking. NH -2a. Zoning Ordinance. Continue to implement and update the Zoning Ordinance as needed to include the criteria listed above. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Fees, Staff Time See CD -3b (Development Standards), CA -13b (Preservation Ordinance), LU -14a (Land Use -Compatibility), I -la (Capital Improvement Programming), H-2a3a (Design Concerns of Single -Family Homes), NH -8a (Restore Parking Spaces), NH -8b (Additional On -Site Parking), NH -8c (Permit Parking) and NH -8d (Zoning Ordinance Review). 66 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS Amended 1/13/2016 NH -3. Housing Mix. Encourage a housing mix with a broad range of affordability, character, and sizes. In areas with a predominance of rental housing, encourage ownership units to increase the variety of housing types. See H-7eTW (Retention of Mobilehomes and Preservation of Existine Mobilehome Sites). H-IOd44b (Zoning for Live/Work Opportunities), H-IOc44e (Single Room Occupancy JSRO) Units), H -18a4-% (Inclusionary Housing Nexus Studv), H -14c2 -3a (Continue to Imnlement Zoning Provisions Standards to Encourage Mixed Use), H-16aH-25a (New Second Units) and LU -24a (Zoning Ordinance Amendments). NH -4. Improve Property Maintenance. Require owners to maintain their properties in good condition and appearance and to eliminate unsafe and unhealthy conditions. NH -4a. Code Enforcement. Maintain an effective Code Enforcement program that engages with neighborhoods and business groups and works in partnerships with appropriate City staff to address nuisances and zoning code violations. Responsibility: Community Development Time Frame: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time, Fines NH -4b. Design Review Conditions of Approval. Through development review, require that design review approval include language whereby owners maintain landscaping in good condition. Responsibility: Community Development Time Frame: Ongoing Resources: Fees NH -4c. Property Maintenance Standards Ordinance. Consider adoption of a property maintenance standards ordinance to maintain minimum standards of the appearance of property, and to sustain property values in a neighborhood. Responsibility: Community Development Time Frame: Long Term Resources: Staff Time Neighborhood Circulation NH -5. Safe Streets. Provide neighborhood streets that are safe, pleasant, and attractive to walk, cycle and drive along. See C -21a (Traffic Calming Program), I -8a (Street Tree Program) and I -8b (Street Trees for New Development). Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS 67 NH -6. Bicycle- and Pedestrian -Friendly Streets. Create bicycle -and pedestrian -friendly residential streets with large street trees, sidewalks and other appropriate amenities. NH -6a. Narrow Streets. In new streets, consider modifying street standards to allow narrower streets that promote bicycle and pedestrian activity and safety, while still providing for emergency and service access. Public streets must be designed to Caltrans and American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials standards. Responsibility: Public Works, Community Development, Fire, Police Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time, Fees. See also C -26a (Implementation), C -27a (Implementation), I -6c (Sidewalk Repair) and C - 4b (Street Design Criteria to Support Alternative Modes). NH -7. Neighborhood Identity and Landmarks. Enhance neighborhood identity and sense of community by retaining and creating gateways, landmarks, and landscape improvements that help to define neighborhood entries and focal points. See CD -4a (Historic Resources Information), CD -4b (Adaptive Reuse), CD -5a (Views) and CD -8a (Gateways). NH -8. Parking. Maintain well -landscaped parking lots and front setbacks in commercial and institutional properties that are located in or adjacent to residential neighborhoods. Promote ways to encourage parking opportunities that are consistent with the design guidelines. NH -8a. Restore Parking Spaces. Continue Code Enforcement efforts to work with apartment owners to restore parking spaces being used for storage. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time, Fines, Fees NH -8b. Additional On -Site Parking. In neighborhoods with excessive on -street parking, work with property owners to add on-site parking where feasible as part of review of expansion or remodels. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees NH -8c. Permit Parking. In neighborhoods with excessive on -street parking, evaluate the benefits and drawbacks of a Permit Parking Program (i.e. to limit cars per unit and/or to limit nonresidential cars) where supported by a significant majority of neighborhood residents. Responsibility: Police, Public Works Timing: Long Term Resources: Staff Time NH -8d. Zoning Ordinance Review. Evaluate and amend as necessary zoning regulations to ensure adequate on-site parking, and sufficient screening of parking areas adjacent to residences. Responsibility: Community Development Timing: Short Term Resources: Staff Time 68 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS Amended 1/13/2016 NH -9. Nuisance Vehicles. Minimize the number of abandoned vehicles, excessive signs on vehicles and vehicles being used as homes, on streets and private property. NH -9a. Abandoned Vehicle Program. Continue the abandoned vehicle abatement program. Responsibility: Police Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time NH -9b. Vehicles as Residences. Continue to implement, and strengthen as necessary, City ordinances that prohibit overnight residential use of vehicles within the public right- of-way on public property, and on private property. Responsibility: Police Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time Neighborhood Economy and Culture NH -10. Neighborhood Centers. Support the vitality of attractive, viable neighborhood centers by using incentives to encourage desired mixed-use, local -services and to create areas for the community to gather. Assist these centers to adapt to changing community needs. Retain existing neighborhood centers unless it can be clearly demonstrated that local -serving uses are not economically feasible. See LU -2a (Development Review) and EV -13 (Business Areas). NH -11. Needed Neighborhood Serving Uses. Give priority to "needed neighborhood serving uses". Examples of needed neighborhood serving uses are: supermarkets; craft stores; cafes; restaurants; drug stores; neighborhood shopping centers which include uses such as dry cleaners, delis and markets, video stores, etc.; health and medical facilities and services; as well as improved public uses and services such as parks, schools, child care, and police services. Other similar uses that serve primarily neighborhood residents and/or employees and receive broad neighborhood support may also qualify. See LU -15 (Convenience Shopping). NH -12. Schools. Work with the school districts to use active school sites as neighborhood gathering places and recreational amenities. Retain local schools where possible, but when reuse is necessary, housing development at prevailing densities in the immediate area should be the appropriate land use. Where it is in the community's interest to retain public recreation, on-site density transfers will be allowed to the remaining school site acreage, provided the resulting housing design is compatible with the neighborhood character. See LU -1 la (Zoning for School Sites) and PR -20b (School Site Recreational Facilities). Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS 69 Over 5,000 people enjoy the Downtown Farmers Market each week. NH -13. Religious Institutions, Educational Facilities, and other Community Organizations. Support community partnerships and communication between neighborhoods and schools, religious and other institutions to enhance mutual understanding and the benefits of collaboration. NH-13a.Community Partnerships. Through the development review process, encourage or require the establishment of committees which include both neighborhood and institutional representatives to address potential impacts and foster better communications. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees See G- 14a (Communication with the School Districts), G -15a (Joint Use of Educational Facilities) and G -16a (Internships). Neighborhood Design NH -14. Gathering Places and Events. To spark social interaction and create a greater sense of community, encourage both daytime and nighttime gathering places and events in appropriate locations, such as cafes, restaurants, outdoor eating places, bookstores, shopping facilities, libraries, schools, churches, parks, recreation facilities, community gardens, farmers' markets, transit stops, parks, recreation facilities, commercial facilities, cultural facilities, teen facilities, and City -sanctioned street closures for festivals, parades, and block parties. Improve parks and their facilities to include active recreation and passive social interaction areas, and, where appropriate, incorporate areas that can accommodate group activities such as social events, picnics and concerts in a manner respectful of nearby residents. NH-14a.Community Events. Explore supporting neighborhood and homeowner associations by promoting community events on the City's website. Responsibility: City Manager, Community Services Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time NH -14b. Gathering Spaces. Through the Design Review process, consider opportunities for public gathering places, where appropriate. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees See also NH -19a (Downtown Events), PR -6a (Community Center Improvements) and PR - 7a (Community Park Improvements). 70 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS Amended 1/13/2016 GOAL 6: A VIBRANT DOWNTOWN It is the goal for San Rafael to have a vibrant, active, and attractive Downtown. San Rafael's Downtown continues to maintain its role as the center of the City's business, cultural, and historical infrastructure by offering quality shopping, a wide range of cultural and entertainment venues, a variety of restaurants, galleries, professional and financial services, employment opportunities, office space, and housing. DOWNTOWN Downtown is a beloved part of San Rafael. It is the business, financial and retail center for San Rafael and Marin County. A wide range of housing, shopping and employment is provided. It has events, celebrations and festivals that attract the entire community. It is the heart and soul of San Rafael, the focal point of the community. NH -15. Downtown Vision. Continue to implement Our Vision of Downtown San Rafael. NH -15a. Downtown Vision. Base periodic review of Downtown policies on the Vision. Responsibility: Economic Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Redevelop. entEconomic Develooment Downtown Economy NH -16. Economic Success. Substantially expand Downtown's economic success and increase opportunities for retail, office and residential development. M NH -16a. Business Development Efforts. Support business development efforts downtown to create a robust retail mix, reinforce a strong office market and promote evening activities, restaurants and entertainment. This includes encouraging cooperative and coordinated programs to manage, recruit and market Downtown businesses. Responsibility: Economic Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Redevelop entEconomic Develooment Residents and visitors enjoy the vibrancy of Fourth Street in Downtown. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS 71 Our Vision of Downtown Our Vision of Downtown San Rafael was developed in the early 1990s through a broad- based collaborative community visioning process. Our Vision contains a narrative picture of what our community wants Downtown to feel and look like in 2020. The following is a brief summary of the most important images envisioned for Downtown San Rafael from Our Vision. Downtown, with its sense of nurturing community, remains the place where a person can rediscover one's roots and sense of history. Downtown San Rafael is our hometown. While safe, friendly, warm, welcoming, and a comfortable mix of old and new, Downtown is alive with the excitement of an urban community and multidimensional city. Downtown generates a climate of good cheer and companionship where people want to socialize, reside, or conduct business. Downtown is a healthy economic center. Thriving and profitable retail is a barometer of the health and vitality of Downtown. Shops provide that personal touch where customers are treated as neighbors and friends whether they are visitors, entrepreneurs who work in Downtown's new class "A" office buildings and in the restored and refurbished Victorians, or those who are attracted to the ambiance of local, personalized retailing. Downtown is a wonderful place to live. Downtown provides a plethora of housing opportunities at both affordable and market rates for those who choose the amenities and advantages of an urban community lifestyle. A young professional beginning a career, a single parent in need of nearby shopping, services, and transit, a senior couple wishing to downsize their suburban home, or a Downtown worker, can find the right living arrangement in one of the condominiums, apartments, duplexes, townhouses, single family homes, or single resident rooms in Downtown San Rafael. Downtown flourishes as our social, cultural, recreational and entertainment center. Many activities are concentrated here, from Falkirk Cultural Center to live theater at Belrose, to movies at the Rafael Film Center, forming the most interesting entertainment venue in the Northern Bay Area. City residents, visitors from neighboring towns, and tourists enjoy our cultural riches: the bookstores, the library, the Mission, art galleries, theater, museums, displays and performances at the community center, as well as street fairs and outdoor entertainment. Downtown puts the spotlight on life. Parades, festivals, fiestas, events, gatherings all happen Downtown: Italian Street Painting, Film Festival, Classic Cars Parade, Halloween Trick or Treat, Winter Lights, Easter Egg Roll, and the Downtown Farmers' Market Festival. The sidewalks are bustling with people meeting friends for coffee at one of the outdoor cafes or restaurants, browsing at the popular farmers' market and shopping in our specialty stores. Downtown celebrates diversity, accepting and valuing differences, creating new relationships among groups, peoples, and individuals of all cultures, economic status and interests. Children, teens, adults, seniors all feel welcome and find something to do. Families especially feel comfortable here and enjoy their Downtown outings. Downtown grows multicolored with the splendor of flowers in boxes and planting areas and streets lined with trees. Downtown is a beautiful place to stroll among a blend of buildings that reflect the area's history and our dynamic times. Downtown is a park -like setting where the urban landscape is softened by the workings of nature and adorned with public art. 72 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS Amended 1/13/2016 NH -17. Competing Concerns. In reviewing and making decisions on projects, there are competing economic, housing, environmental and design concerns that must be balanced. No one factor should dominate; however, economic and housing development are high priorities to the health of Downtown. NH -18. Economic Center. Strengthen Downtown's position as a major business, financial and office center for the city and the county by maintaining a diversified economic base reflecting a mutually supportive combination of retail, office, service and government uses. NH -18a. Hotel/Cineplex. Support the development of a hotel to sustain the office market and a Cineplex to enhance the retail, restaurant and entertainment offerings in Downtown. Responsibility: Community DevelonmentEE(mm.&k Do ,,&TwkN *amity MxxnaBer Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Redevelop.. en Economic Development NH -19. Healthy Retail Sector. Promote a healthy retail sector, essential to a successful and prosperous Downtown. See NH -15a (Downtown Vision). NH -20. Event Center. Expand Downtown's reputation as the event center for the city by encouraging parades, festivals, celebrations, promotional sales and sports events. These activities may occur throughout Downtown; in the streets, parking lots, sidewalks, lawn areas and private property; and are sponsored by public, private and non-profit organizations, individuals and businesses. NH -20a. Downtown Events. Continue to encourage high profile, signature events to bring people Downtown and to promote Downtown San Rafael. These events should include, but are not limited to, promotional events, youth and family entertainment, and the activities at Downtown cultural facilities. Responsibility: Economic Development, Community Development, Community Services Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees, Donations NH -20b. Entertainment Activities. Promote entertainment activities in Downtown. Responsibility: Economic Development, Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time The City Plaza is home to local celebrations. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS 73 NH -21. Cultural and Entertainment Promotion. Promote Downtown as the cultural and entertainment center of San Rafael and the County to bring people Downtown and stimulate other business opportunities. See NH -18a (Hotel/Cineplex) and—NH-20a (Downtown Events) a44 Community Vision of Gutuf .,,,a n :0 ir. E.�'R�&N,4). Downtown Homes NH -22. Housing Downtown. Create a popular and attractive residential environment that contributes to the activity and sense of community Downtown. This includes: a. Preserving and upgrading existing units, b. Providing incentives to encourage new private sector construction of housing, particularly affordable housing, live/work units, and single room occupancy (SRO) units, c. Designing units that take advantage of Downtown's views, proximity to shopping and services, and transit, and d. Implementing zoning standards that reflect Downtown's urban character. See H -14c (Continue to Implement Zoning Provisions to Encourage Mixed Use)14 23 (Zoning Standards to Encoufage Mixed Use)7 Downtown Circulation NH -23. Full Use of Street System. To enable our desired uses and activities to happen Downtown, encourage full use of streets and alleyways reflecting Downtown's urban character. See C -3a (Transportation Technology), C -4a (Street Pattern and Traffic Flow), C -4b (Street Design Criteria to Support Alternative Modes, C - 6a (Updated Proposed Circulation Improvements). NH -24. Full Range of Transportation Options. In addition to autos, encourage a variety of ways for people to travel to, in, and through Downtown, including: • Bicycle and walking paths to other neighborhoods, Boyd and Albert Parks, and along Mahon Creek, • Bike lanes where appropriate, • Efficient bus service, • The Mahon Creek A rail transitway, and . Path is a recent Shuttle buses. pedestrian/ bicycle path and See C -10a. (Advocating Alternative Mode Projects) and C-1 la (Car and Vanpooling) C - environmental 1 l (Car Sharing), C-1lc (Low -Impact Alternative Vehicles) and C-1 Id (Bike to Work enhancement. Day). 74 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS Amended 1/13/2016 NH -25. Pedestrian Comfort and Safety. Make Downtown's street systems more comfortable and safe for pedestrians by: • Balancing between the needs of pedestrians and the desire for efficient traffic flow, • Slowing traffic where necessary, • Providing two-way traffic where feasible, • Making pedestrian crossings direct and safe, • Establishing pedestrian environments unique to each District, • Improving and/or expanding sidewalks, street trees, landscaping and other sidewalk amenities, • Increasing visibility to storefronts and businesses, • Seeking innovative solutions and ideas. See C -27a (Implementation), C -27b (Prioritizing Pedestrian Improvements), C -27c (Bay Trail), C -27d (Pedestrian Safety Enforcement), C -27e (Pedestrian Safety) and C -28a (Urban Trail Network Project). NH -26. Refine Look of Lincoln, Hetherton, Lindaro and Andersen Drive. Improve the look and function of these important streets by emphasizing safe and efficient movement of pedestrians, cars and, where feasible, bicycles traveling into and through Downtown. NH -26a. Pedestrian Lighting. Evaluate pedestrian lighting along Lincoln Avenue for safety. Responsibility: Public Works, Police Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time See C -4a (Street Pattern and Traffic Flow), C -4b (Street Design Criteria to Support Alternative Modes) and C -23a (Better Signage). NH -27. Parking. Continue to make parking convenient and easy to find by encouraging solutions that address Downtown's urban parking situation. Needed improvements include: • Providing a range of long and short-term parking. • Facilitating the joint use of parking areas where appropriate. • Reducing the visual impacts of parking areas through design and landscaping. • Improving pedestrian safety in parking lots and garages. • Alleviating parking congestion where appropriate by converting underdeveloped open lots into public and private parking lots. • Improving signage and visibility of public parking facilities. NH-27a.Downtown Parking Strategy. Continue to maintain a comprehensive parking strategy including the management of the operations (revenue, enforcement and maintenance). Responsibility: Management Services, Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Parking Services Fund See C -30a (Downtown Parking District). Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS 75 Downtown Urban Design NH -28. Special Place. Preserve Downtown's reputation as a special place by developing a design strategy that capitalizes on Downtown's existing strengths: • Unique urban characteristics and density, • Diversity in architectural design, and • Historic heritage and buildings. See NH -29a (Implement Downtown Design Guidelines). NH -29. Downtown Design. New and remodeled buildings must contribute to Downtown's hometown feel. Design elements that enhance Downtown's identity and complement the existing attractive environment are encouraged, and may be required for locations with high visibility or for compatibility with historic structures. Design considerations include: • Varied and distinctive building designs, • Sensitive treatment of historic resources, • Generous landscaping to accent buildings, • Appropriate materials and construction, and • Site design and streetscape continuity. NH -29a. Implement Downtown Design Guidelines. Implement the Downtown Design Guidelines through the design review process. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time NH -29b. Update Downtown Design Guidelines. Update the Downtown Design Guidelines and zoning regulations as needed. Responsibility: Community Development, Economic Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time, General Fund Sidewalk dining is encouraged in the downtown. NH -30. Pedestrian Environments. Enhance Downtown's streets by establishing pedestrian environments appropriate to each District. These environments could include the following: • Well-designed window displays and views into retail stores, • Outdoor businesses and street vendors, • Signs that are easy for pedestrians to see and read, • Sun -filled outdoor courtyards, plazas and seating areas, • Attractive street furniture and lighting, • Information kiosks and public art. See NH -29a. (Implement Downtown Design Guidelines), NH -29b (Update Downtown Design Guidelines), EV -2e (Street Vendors). 76 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS Amended 1/13/2016 NH -31. Ground Floor Designed for Pedestrians. Ensure that all buildings, regardless of height, are comfortable for people at the street level. This includes: • Relating wall and window heights to the height of people, • Use of architectural elements to create visual interest, • Adding landscaping and insets and alcoves for pedestrian interest, and, • Stepping upper stories back as building height increases. See NH -29a (Implement Downtown Design Guidelines), NH -29b (Update Downtown Design Guidelines). NH -32. Historic Character. Recognize and use the unique character of Downtown's many attractive, well -liked, historic buildings. Encourage new development on sites in the Downtown area to be compatible with nearby historic buildings, the historic Downtown street pattern, and the area's historic, pedestrian -oriented character. See LU -2a (Development Review), CD -4a (Historic Resources Information), CD -4b (Adaptive Reuse), CA -13a (Inventory Update) and CA -13b (Preservation Ordinance). NH -33. Downtown's Neighbors. Distinguish Downtown from adjoining neighborhood areas by: • Establishing major entrances to Downtown with gateway treatments, • Keeping all Downtown activities within the Downtown area, and • Providing a gradual transition into adjacent residential neighborhoods in terms of building scale and intensity of use. See CD -la (Gateway Enhancements) NH -29a (Implement Downtown Design Guidelines), and NH -29b (Update Downtown Design Guidelines). Downtown Districts Downtown San Rafael is a mosaic of six districts, each of which has a unique character. The individual character of each district is well defined; the districts are interconnected and together make up our whole Downtown. The Districts are: • Fourth Street Retail Core • Netherton Office District • Lindaro Office District Our Vision of Downtown describes six districts within the Downtown area. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS 77 • Second/Third Mixed -Use District • West End Village • Fifth/Mission Residential/Office District Vision districts have been translated into General Plan land use designations, which closely follow the boundaries described in the Vision. Three districts are not expected to change significantly: Fifth/Mission, the West End Village, and the Fourth Street Retail Core. Other parts of Downtown are expected to have greater changes over time, particularly the Lindaro Office District, w"i ow priA ~Ily vaGaRt. Fourth Street Retail Core Fourth Street Retail Core: The heart of Downtown, the primary shopping area and the center of entertainment, public events and social activities. This district encompasses Fourth Street from Lincoln to E Street. Restored after the 1989 earthquake, the Rafael Film Center features films from around the world. NH -34. Fourth Street Retail Core. a. Mix of Uses. Make the Fourth Street Retail Core the center of San Rafael's activities, with a diverse mix of uses including retail, service, entertainment, cultural, finance, office and housing. Housing and general office uses are encouraged on upper floors. b. Successful retail area. Develop Downtown San Rafael as one of the most interesting and popular shopping areas in the Bay Area by making it vibrant and alive all day and evening, full of people and activities and offering a wide variety of unique shops. With uses such as restaurants, coffee houses and bookstores, Fourth Street and the cross streets will be a vigorous and growing retail center highly valued by Marin County residents. C. "Alive -after -five." Maintain a mix of businesses active at different times of the day and the week, especially to keep Fourth Street active and busy after 5 PM; by encouraging existing businesses to remain open in the evenings; and by attracting new businesses, that are open later in the day. d. Entertainment Center. Encourage the location of additional entertainment venues in the Fourth Street corridor, which will attract people from throughout the Bay Area, and benefit Downtown businesses and the San Rafael community. NH -34a. Downtown Management. Coordinate and encourage property and business owners, the San Rafael Chamber of Commerce, city officials and the Business Improvement District (BID) in efforts to market Downtown businesses. Responsibility: Economic Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Redovelopmen Economic Development 78 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS Amended 1/13/2016 NH -34b. Fourth Street Staging Area. Use the Fourth Street Retail Core as the primary staging area for Downtown events and activities. Continue to accommodate enterprises ranging from the Downtown Farmers Market, parades, fiestas and sidewalk sales to outdoor cafes and vendors. Responsibility: Economic Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time, Partnerships See LU -2a (Development Review), NH -16a (Business Development Efforts), and NH -20a (Downtown Events). NH -35. Fourth Street Retail Core Design Considerations. a. Heart of Downtown. Enhance the image of the San Rafael City Plaza as the Heart of Downtown, so it will be the area that first comes to mind when people think of Downtown. Promote Fourth Street as a lively area where people congregate before moving on to the Rafael Theater, shopping areas and evening activities. b. Outdoor Gathering Places. Encourage a variety of inviting and safe public and private outdoor gathering places for community celebrations, people watching and recreation. c. Fourth Street Core Improvements. Improve City Plaza i n the appearance of Fourth Street through Downtown, landscaping and additional trees, street and sidewalk enhancements, infilling created by closing undeveloped lots, discouraging curb cuts, and renovating building facades. part of Court Street, opened in 2002. d. Parking lot connections. Improve pedestrian connections between public parking lots and Fourth Street. e. Heights. Heights of individual buildings will vary, ranging from two to four stories, with increased height permitted in some locations consistent with bonus height policies. Buildings on the south side of Fourth Street should limit the blockage of sunlight on the sidewalks on the north side of Fourth Street. NH -35a. Plaza Improvements. Consider improvements for the Plaza such as additional landscaping including shade trees, seating and public art, and retain its function as a community -gathering place. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Capital Improvement See NH -29a (Implement Downtown Design Guidelines), NH -29b (Update Downtown Design Guidelines) and CD -17a (Street Furnishings). Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS 79 Hetherton Office District The major gateway to Downtown and center of our transportation system. This office district is adjacent to Highway 101. NH -36. Hetherton Office District. a. Office Center. Emphasize development related to the Transportation Center, especially office and professional service buildings, which could include limited areas for street -level retail uses. Residential is also strongly encouraged in this area. b. Transportation Hub. Use the Transportation Center to coordinate and facilitate the different ways people move to and around Downtown, including bus, rail, auto, bicycle and on foot. Include safe pedestrian and bicycle connections linking this area to the stores, services, cultural facilities, and recreational opportunities in other parts of Downtown. Expand connections from the Transportation Center to other parts of the City by: • Encouraging expanded bus transit, • Considering shuttle service to feasible locales when such service is warranted and can be funded, • Incorporating a rail station 4with the initiation of rail service • • Improving walking and biking facilities, • Providing a safe connection to Mahon Path, • Facilitating the movement of commuters to and from the neighborhoods, and • Creating safer pedestrian crossings on Second and Third Streets. NH -36a. Zoning Ordinance. Amend the Zoning Ordinance to allow more flexibility in uses in Hetherton Office zoning district. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time NH -36b. Transit Service. Support efforts by Caltrans, the Golden Gate Bridge District, the Marin County Transit District. Sonoma -Marin Area Rail Transit (SMART) District and other transportation providers to increase transit service at the Transportation Center. Pursue the implementation of the Downtown Station Area Plan in coordination with transit services. Responsibility: Public Works, Community Development Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time See C -17a (SMART Service), C -20a (Transit Hubs) and LU -2a (Development Review). NH -37. Hetherton Office District Design Considerations. a. Downtown Gateway. Transform the Hetherton Office District into an elegant transition into Downtown San Rafael. Improve the entries to Downtown at Third Street, Fifth Street, Mission Avenue, Lincoln Avenue and the freeway ramps with entrance graphics, enhanced planting and lighting. Buildings should complement the district's entryway treatment and provide an attractive facade along Hetherton Street. b. Fourth and Hetherton. Announce and mark this primary gateway to Downtown with a distinctive gateway treatment at Fourth Street and Hetherton, which is gracious and welcoming in character. Design issues to consider are: 80 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS Amended 1/13/2016 • Plaza or other open space areas both public and private, • Public art, • Strong landscaping design, and • Retail uses opening on to a plaza or other open space areas. Hetherton Design. Encourage projects of high quality and varied design with landmark features that enhance the District's gateway image. Examples include: • Building design emphasizing the gateway character and complementing the district's transitional treatment by incorporating accent elements, public art and other feature items, • Upper stories stepped back, • Ground floor areas have a pedestrian scale, • Retail uses opening onto public areas, • Useable outdoor spaces, courtyards and arcades that are landscaped, in sunny locations and protected from freeway noise. d. Under Highway 101 Viaduct. Work with Caltrans to make the area under the freeway attractive and safe with, for example, maintained landscaping, public art, creek enhancements or fencing. e. Height. Building heights of three to five stories are allowed west of the rail transitway, and typically up to three stories east of the rail transitway. NH-37a.Freeway Ramps. Work with Caltrans, civic organizations and neighborhood associations to beautify the freeway ramps with enhanced landscaping. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time See NH -29a (Implement Downtown Design Guidelines), NH -29b (Update Downtown Design Guidelines). Lindaro Office District At the southeast corner of Downtown, a major development area with office and some retail uses. NH -38. Lindaro Office District. a. Strategically significant gateway. Continue the transformation of the Lindaro Office District into one of the most handsome urban places in Marin County by developing landmark, well-designed buildings. This District will be a special asset to the city and enhance Downtown's image as a high quality business center. The primary purpose of this district is to attract new people that would shop and use the rest of Downtown, particularly the Fourth Street Retail Core. b. Mix of uses. Encourage an office complex that may include limited and incidental office -serving retail uses, a major hotel, cultural or entertainment facility, or residential, if feasible. Large community -serving ("big box") retail and shopping The San Rafael Corporate Center, Class A office development, is a redevelopment of Brownfield site in Downtown. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS 81 centers are not allowed in this District. Any project must achieve the objectives described in (a) above. c. San Rafael Corporate Center. Encourage the completion of the development of the San Rafael Corporate Center as a distinctive, high quality office center, which can include a coordinated mix of uses as stated above complementing, not competing with other Downtown Districts, especially the Fourth Street Retail Core. This project's superior design quality will be the major identifying characteristic of the District and must be a graceful addition to the views of Downtown from Highway 101. See LU -2a (Development Review), NH -16a (Business Development Efforts), NH -29a (Implement Downtown Design Guidelines), NH -29b (Update Downtown Design Guidelines). NH -39. Lindaro Office District Design Considerations. a. Building design and sense of place. Evoke a strong sense of place through site and building design that includes: • Buildings oriented to take advantage of the Creek frontage and views of Mt. Tamalpais, • Variety in architectural styles, • Varied setbacks on Second Street, • Arcades and courtyards, • Buildings that are inviting and attractive on all sides facing the street or pedestrian areas, • Reduced visual impact of parking areas through site design and landscaping, • Screened PG&E transformer area, and • Screened areas for service vehicles. b. Regional and neighborhood emphasis. Although the District should be architecturally distinctive and urban in character, appealing to the broader region, blend development carefully with neighborhoods to the south and with adjacent office development in the Second/Third Corridor and Hetherton Gateway Districts. c. Active ground floor. Enhance the pedestrians' environment through active street frontages and buildings with a human scale at the ground level. d. Lindaro connections. Tie the different properties and developments in the area together through a wide variety of elements including: • Compatible uses and tenant mix, • A network of public spaces linked by pedestrian pathways, and • Enhanced appearances of Lincoln Avenue, Lindaro Street and Andersen Drive through continuity of streetscape features such as lighting, street trees and sidewalks. e. Links to other districts. Connect Lindaro to the rest of Downtown through site design and streetscape continuity with adjoining districts. f. Mahon Creek improvements. Continue to improve access to Mahon Creek through useable recreation areas, landscaping, bike paths and walkways. g. Height. Provide a variety of heights in individual buildings: two to four stories, with a height bonus up to six stories. 82 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS Amended 1/13/2016 NH -39a. Mahon Creek. Complete the implementation of the adopted Mahon Creek Final Conceptual Plan. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Grants, Donations, Capital Improvement See NH -29a (Implement Downtown Design Guidelines), NH -29b (Update Downtown Design Guidelines). Second/Third Mixed Use District An attractive, safe and efficient transportation corridor along Second and Third Streets. NH -40. Second/Third Mixed -Use District. a. Auto -oriented uses. Allow a vital, varied and compatible mix of offices, retail uses, and residential uses, where appropriate. Uses usually accessed by car should be concentrated along the west end of Second Street to take advantage of the high traffic volumes. 2 Enhance pedestrian character. Enhance the pedestrian character of the A and B cross streets by encouraging a variety of uses, including neighborhood serving and specialty retail uses, and residential uses. PG&E office building site. This site offers a major redevelopment opportunity as an infill site that could accommodate a mix of land uses, including residential if feasible, that would take advantage of the site's high visibility from Second and Third Streets, extend the uses on the San Rafael Corporate Center, or provide patrons for the Fourth Street Retail Core. d. Transportation Corridor. Make Second and Third Streets a very attractive, safe and efficient transportation corridor that allows smooth travel through Downtown, provides easy access to the Fourth Street Core via the cross streets and is safe to walk along and cross. Substantially improve Second and Third Streets through: • Screening pedestrians from the perception of traffic noise and encouraging pedestrian use of other streets, • Improving pedestrian connections to Fourth Street, • Providing safe crosswalks at all intersections, • Reducing the number of driveways that interrupt sidewalks, and • Managing traffic flow for efficiency, not speed. e. Improved parking. Develop attractive, screened and easy -to -find public and private parking areas serving both the Fourth Street Retail Core and the Second/Third Street Corridor. NH -40a. Zoning Ordinance. Amend the Zoning Ordinance to allow more flexibility in uses in CSMU, 2/3 MUE, and MUW zoning districts. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time Palm trees frame the view up A Street from Albert Park to St. Raphael's Church. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS 83 See LU -2a (Development Review), NH -18a (Hotel/Cineplex) and NH -29a (Implement Downtown Design Guidelines), NH -29b (Update Downtown Design Guidelines). NH -41. Second/Third Mixed Use District Design Considerations. a. An inviting appearance. Create an inviting appearance to people traveling Second and Third Streets. Encourage attractive, creative and varied architecture on Second and Third Streets, with design detail on all sides of buildings visible to the street or pedestrians. b. Unique character of cross streets. A, B, C and D Streets are important links from Fourth Street to neighborhoods south of Downtown. Strengthen the unique character of these cross streets by giving special treatment to: • A Street as an important visual and pedestrian connection between Mission San Rafael Arcangel and Albert Park and Andersen Drive, • B Street as an area of strong historic character, and • B, C and D Streets as major pedestrian connections between the Gerstle Park Neighborhood and the Fourth Street Retail Core. c. Height. Individual building heights will vary and typically range from two to four stories east of B Street, and from one to three stories generally west of B Street. See NH -29a (Implement Downtown Design Guidelines), NH -29b (Update Downtown Design Guidelines), LU -13 (Height Bonuses), Exhibit 9 (Building Height Limits in Downtown San Rafael). West End Village A mixed-use village with strong connections to the Retail Core. This district is located along Fourth Street west of E Street. NH -42. West End Village. a. Village within Downtown. Keep the West End Village a unique, friendly, desirable place to live and shop. Activities in this district help meet the needs of the surrounding neighborhoods. Encourage residential use on the upper floors of buildings. b. Unique shopping district. Continue to encourage development that makes the West End Village a unique place to shop. One -of -a -kind businesses, such as bakeries, restaurants, craft stores, art galleries and furniture stores; outdoor uses such as sidewalk cafes; and a major retail anchor use are all part of the West End's special blend of retail. c. Retail anchor. Encourage upgrading the Yardbird's Center retail anchor by: • Integrating all the individual properties and parking lots into a well designed center, • Coordinating and connecting the shopping center with the other stores and services along the west end of Fourth Street, • Providing a wide variety of goods and services, and • Including outdoor restaurants, sales and activities. 84 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS Amended 1/13/2016 d. Improve parking. Upgrade existing parking and create new, easy to find parking areas by: • Requiring new development to provide adequate new parking areas, • Screening parking areas with landscaping, and • Locating parking lot entrances on side streets where possible. e. Parking Lots on Fourth Street. Encourage the redevelopment of parking lot sites (such as car dealers and private, open parking lots) on Fourth Street west of Shaver Street. See LU -2a (Development Review), NH -29a (Implement Downtown Design Guidelines), NH -29b (Update Downtown Design Guidelines). NH -43. West End Village Design Considerations. a. Residential design. Blend new multifamily development on Second and Third Streets into the character and appearance of the Latham Street neighborhood. For example, new development should have elements similar to existing structures, entrances oriented toward the street, and driveways and garages that are recessed or under the buildings. Encourage lot consolidation for better site design. b. Village identity. Create a distinct identity for the Village with, for example, a sign program or bench program unique to the District. c. Historic neighborhood shopping district. Preserve the West End Village as a beautiful, inviting, relaxed place with a comfortable neighborhood character. Keep its historic appearance and small-scale buildings. West End Village design includes: • Retaining the small storefront pattern, and building to the sidewalk, and • Facade improvements and lighter and brighter building colors. d. Attractive outdoor setting. Increase interest for pedestrians with: • Outdoor cafes and other activities, • Streetscape improvements, such as decorative banners, benches and public art, • Small staging areas for events in the Village and/or extend into the Core, • Sidewalk repairs, • Views to the creek where possible, and • Plentiful and colorful landscaping. e. Fourth Street Retail Core connection. Visually connect the Village to the Core, for example, by installing street lighting and trees similar to those in the Core. f. Height. Respect the low scale development of buildings one to three stories in height with housing or office above ground floor retail. See NH -29a (Implement Downtown Design Guidelines), NH -29b (Update Downtown Design Guidelines), LU -13 (Height Bonuses), Exhibit 9 (Building Height Limits in Downtown San Rafael). Fifth/Mission Residential/Office District Our civic center and cultural district, with residential and office uses. This district is located along Fifth and Mission, west of Irwin Street. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS 85 NH -44. Fifth/Mission Residential/Office District. a. San Rafael City Hall. Retain government services at San Rafael City Hall. b. Office and residential uses. Intermingle office and residential uses throughout the District. East of B Street is a comfortable blend of mid-sized office buildings and residential developments. Medical services, social service providers and non- profit organizations are concentrated in the attractive Victorian buildings west of E Street. c. Cultural district. Encourage a thriving cultural district, based on the many community -cultural activities at the theaters, schools, library, museum, churches and historic buildings. See LU -2a (Development Review) and CA -1 la (Facility Needs). NH -45. Fifth/Mission Residential/Office District Design Considerations. a. Culturally -rich historic district. Reinforce the graceful, historic and cultural strengths of the District by showcasing resources, such as the Falkirk Cultural Center, the City Library building, the Boyd House and the many Victorian structures by, for example: • Retaining public spaces, such as the lawn area in front of Falkirk Cultural Center, • Opening the front of the Boyd House landscaping to the street and promoting adaptive reuse of the historic home and landscape, • Adding a historic museum in Boyd Park and creating a more identifiable and accessible entrance into Boyd Park, • Improving pedestrian safety along Mission Street, and • Connecting this area into the activities at Courthouse Square and the City Plaza. b. Fifth Avenue and A Street. Retain the open areas at the intersection of Fifth Avenue and A Street on the north side of Fifth Avenue in front of St. Raphael's Church, and along the Courthouse Square Building. c. Fifth/Mission design. Encourage an interesting diversity of building styles in the Fifth/Mission District ranging from historic Victorians to well -articulated new office buildings. On Fifth Avenue west of E Street and on the east and west ends of Mission Avenue: • Design infill office and residential development to be compatible with existing neighborhood qualities, and • Include landscaped front yards and historic building characteristics. d. Fifth/Mission pedestrian character. Enhance the pedestrian character by preserving mature landscaping, planting more street trees and by enhancing views down the cross streets. In addition, establish a strong visual and pedestrian access connection on B Street from Boyd Park to Albert Park, and stronger connections between the Fifth/Mission District and surrounding neighborhoods. 86 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS Amended 1/13/2016 Height. Heights of individual buildings will vary, but be similar in scale to existing buildings west of E Street, and on the east end of Mission. Two to three story offices are anticipated east of B Street. F_ See NH -29a (Implement Downtown Design Guidelines), NH -29b (Update Downtown Design Guidelines). BAYSIDE ACRES Bayside Acres is in an unincorporated portion of the City along Point San Pedro Road primarily developed with large single-family homes on hillside lots. Homes located west of Point San Pedro and along the Bay are developed on smaller lots. A few properties have been annexed into San Rafael in recent years. -314li:/_1alim Formerly a dairy farm, Bret Harte is a historical district developed after World War II. Land use in this neighborhood is primarily residential with single-family homes and high-density apartments along Woodland Avenue. Residents of Bret Harte travel through an adjacent industrial area to access their neighborhood, thus upgrades to Francisco Boulevard West and Woodland Avenue are of great interest. Due to the smaller size of many of the homes, Bret Harte is considered a more affordable housing area and attracts many young couples and families. The Bret Harte Park is a central fixture of the neighborhood and is the setting for many community events and activities. NH -46. Bret Harte Neighborhood Plan. Prepare a plan for the neighborhood to address neighborhood concerns. See NH -la. (Neighborhood Planning Process). CALIFORNIA PARK California Park is an unincorporated area of the City, east of the Bret Harte neighborhood. The 103 -acre neighborhood consists of single- family homes and apartments. The undeveloped Scheutzen Subdivision, located along Auburn Street, consists of very small lots within a wetland area. NH -47. California Park. Absent significant environmental constraints, a medium density residential General Plan amendment could be considered for the Scheutzen site due to the subdivision's proximity to the proposed transitway and a potential transit station location. Future development on the site shall protect all on-site wetland areas. See LU -7 (Land Use Planning in Surrounding Jurisdictions). V i s i o n o f Bayside Acres Bayside Acres, located in an unincorporated area of the County, is one of San Rafael's less dense neighborhoods and is not expected to change. However, annexation of more properties into the City will remain a possibility. V i s i o n o f Bret Harte New development in this neighborhood is expected to be minimal, with development limited to a few single-family homes on hillside lots. This area also needs to be protected from the potential impacts of nearby industrial businesses. Vision of C a l i f o r n i a P a r k This neighborhood, located in an unincorporated area of the County, has some development potential remaining on the Scheutzen parcels. Any development of these parcels will need to protect the on-site wetlands. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS 87 CANAL NEIGHBORHOOD The Canal Neighborhood encompasses the residential and nonresidential areas south of the San Rafael Canal and east of Highway 101. The residential portion, including the Canal, Spinnaker and Bay Point houses more people than any other part of San Rafael. It is comprised of many large apartment buildings, condominium complexes, townhomes and duplexes, as well as single-family homes along the Canalfront. The nonresidential areas include an older industrial area north of Bellam Blvd. and west of Belvedere Street, a newer light industrial/office area south of Bellam Blvd., and a light industrial/office and industrial area between 1-580 and Highway 101. Businesses within the neighborhood include industrial, commercial, car dealerships, and office. The neighborhood has a major impact on the local economy comprising 15 percent of the City's jobs. The neighborhood also has outstanding natural features including the San Rafael Vision of the Canal There will not be much more development in the area. Marin Square is the Southern Gateway to San Rafael. Potential land uses include a hotel (Gary Place site), and mixed-use (neighborhood and region serving), with retail on the ground level and residential above or behind the street frontage. The Medway/Vivian Way area is the heart of the Canal neighborhood, and should be redeveloped with neighborhood serving mixed -uses. Gathering places with pedestrian connections through the Medway -Vivian block should also be encouraged. The corridor from Francisco Boulevard East along Medway Road to Canal Street is the major entryway into the Canal neighborhood, a true gateway for residents, business owners, students, and shoppers. Sidewalks will be widened, lighting and landscaping installed and amenities such as benches and signage will be added. All of this will make the corridor more inviting and safer by striking a balance between pedestrians and bicyclists and the numerous cars, buses and trucks that drive through the corridor every day. General commercial should be allowed along Francisco Boulevard East, with neighborhood retail and services uses such as a health center, police station, and childcare. Canal, a two-mile long Bay Shoreline Parkband featuring the Bay Trail, regionally important wetlands, and the San Quentin Ridge hillside. Parks and schools include Pickleweed Park and Bahia Vista Elementary School. Neighborhood Homes NH -48. New Residential Areas. Develop well-designed new residential areas at medium to high densities in the neighborhood. Provide residential development opportunities close to jobs, and support and enhance the existing residential neighborhood. See LU -14a (Land Use Compatibility). NH -49. Conflicting Uses. Prevent the encroachment of new residential development into the Light Industrial/Office District to minimize conflicts. Businesses locating adjacent to residential areas shall be designed to minimize nuisance impacts. See LU -14a (Land Use Compatibility) and CD - 12a (Compatibility of Building Patterns). NH -50. Canal Neighborhood Plan. Prepare a new Canal Neighborhood Plan. Building on the results of Canal Voice, create a vision for the neighborhood that addresses the need for better access, more shopping and services, and improved housing. See NH -1a. (Neighborhood Planning). SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS Amended 1/13/2016 Neighborhood Economy and Culture NH -51. Existing Business Areas. Support and encourage the upgrading of existing business areas, consistent with infrastructure needs. Encourage redevelopment and upgrading of existing sites. See EV -13a (Zoning Regulations). NH -52. New Business Development. Encourage and give priority to new business development that benefits the neighborhood through provision of needed services, low traffic impacts, or employment of a high percentage of neighborhood residents. Encourage opportunities for local residents to own and operate businesses. See EV -2b (Infill and Reuse Opportunities) and LU -14a (Land Use Compatibility). NH -53. Building and Automotive Services. Maintain availability of sites for building, automotive and related service industries important to San Rafael's economy and needed for the convenience of its residents and businesses. See LU -16a (Building and Automotive Services). NH -54. Medway/Vivian Redevelopment. Encourage the following in the Medway/Vivian Way area: • Neighborhood serving -uses, such as a health center, neighborhood retail and services, and childcare; • Community gathering places; and • Pedestrian connections through the MedwayNivian block. NH -54a. Expansion of the NC District. Maintain or -di anee and map to �par� tl:- NC District zoning to encourage neighborhood -serving commercial uses and housing in the area. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Short TermOngoing Resources: Staff Time NH -55. Canalways. Recognize the high resource value of the site's wetlands that provide habitat to many species, which may include rare and endangered species. In addition, recognize that this site is in an area affected by traffic congestion. With any development of this property, buffer site wetlands from buildings and parking lots, and obtain trail easements and improvements for the Jean and John Starkweather Shoreline Park. Development shall be located along the western edge of the site and to the greatest extent feasible in areas outside of delineated wetlands or areas determined as critical upland habitat for endangered species. NH -55a. Wetlands Enhancement. Require a wetlands delineation and wetland habitat analysis to assist in identifying appropriate area for development. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Fees Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS 89 NH -56. Windward Way (APN 009-330-01). Allow medium density residential use on the privately owned 2.5 -acre parcel with development clustered at the south end to retain views of the park site from Windward Way. Avoid conflicts with overhead wires. See LU -2a. (Development Review) and PR -9 (New Parks). NH -57. City Lot at Southwest Corner of Bellam and Windward Way. Use this site, or proceeds from development of the site, to provide needed neighborhood services. See LU -2a (Development Review). NH -58. Marin Square/Gary Place Redevelopment. Encourage joint planning for the Marin Square/Gary Place area, including improved access to Gary Place. With any future redevelopment of the Marin Square shopping center and Gary Place, emphasize the following land uses: mixed-use (retail on the ground level and residential above), and possibly a hotel. Marin Square could be redeveloped as a mixed- use center, with housing and a hotel. NH -58a. Development Review Process. As part of a development application, consider land use changes to Gary Place to allow redevelopment of the site. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Fees See LU -2a (Development Review). NH -59. Cal -Pox Site (East of Home Depot). Allow light industrial/office, specialty retail, and region -serving specialty retail uses. Traffic congestion in the area, prior to needed roadway improvements, may limit development on the site to low traffic - generating uses. Hotel use may be considered for the site provided that environmental analysis demonstrates that potentially hazardous soils conditions are in compliance with State and Federal laws and that geo-seismic conditions and commercial use conflicts have been mitigated. NH -59a. Development Review Process. As part of a development application, consider land use changes to Cal -Pox Site to allow for redevelopment. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Fees See LU -2a (Development Review). 90 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS Amended 1/13/2016 NH -60. Marin Rod & Gun Club. Should the club discontinue use of the site for recreational activities, allow high density residential or hotel use and provide for public access. NH -60a. Development Review Process. As part of a development application, consider land use changes to the Marin Rod and Gun Club to allow for redevelopment. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Fees See LU -2a (Development Review). Neighborhood Design NH -61. Public Plaza. Encourage the creation of a public plaza to serve the Canal community. NH -61a. Public Plaza. Through development review process, encourage a public plaza area. If funding becomes available, identify a location and purchase land for a plaza. Responsibility: Community Development, Economic Development Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Grants, Donations, Staff Time NH -62. Parks and Recreation. Increase recreation opportunities and facilities to serve neighborhood residents and employees. Complete planned Pickleweed Park and Starkweather Shoreline Park improvements, enhance Beach Park, and plan and implement park improvements at the Bellam/Windward Way site. See PR -5a (Needs Survey), PR -7a (Community Park Improvements), PR -8a (Neighborhood Park Improvements), PR -9 (Bellam/Windward Way site) and PR -13a (Commercial Recreation). NH -63. Community Meeting Rooms. Meet the need for affordable meeting/activity space, during prime times for the community for resident serving programs and activities such as English as a Second Language classes and other programs and activities, with priority given to neighborhood residents. NH -63a. Community Use of Pickleweed Park. Continue to encourage neighborhood use of Pickleweed Community Center. Responsibility: Community Services Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time, Partnerships NH -64. Schools. Support efforts of the School District to provide adequate space for increasing student enrollments. Encourage continued City/School dialogue on such issues. NH -64a. Schools. Continue to support School District efforts to provide to expand or replace the existing Bahia Vista School in the Canal neighborhoods. Responsibility: City Manager Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS 91 NH -65. Library Services. Support expanded library services in the Canal Neighborhood. See CA -12a (Opportunities for Community -Based Libraries). NH -66. Childcare. Provide more affordable, quality, childcare facilities that support the community. See LU -19a (Zoning for Childcare Programs) and G -15a (Joint Use of Educational Facilities). NH -67. Community Classes and Programs. Provide more programming at Pickleweed, such as College of Marin bilingual classes, library services, Kids' Club, pre-school and after-school programs. See PR -27a (Recreational Programs) and PR -28a (Summer Programs). NH -68. Shoreline Embankments. Require riprap on the outside face of levees facing the Bay. After large storms, inspect existing riprap on levee faces. Repair and replace as necessary to provide adequate wave erosion protection. Starkweather Shoreline Park is a beautiful setting to enjoy the bayfront. NH -68a. Riprap. When the levees are improved, require riprap of the type and size approved by the Public Works Department on the outside face of the levee. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time See S -17a (Title 18 Flood Protection Standards). NH -69. San Quentin Ridge. Preserve San Quentin Ridge as open space through the development process due to its visual significance, importance as a community separator, slope stability problems and wildlife/endangered species habitat value. The exact delineation of "conservation" and "development" portions of the site on the land use map is schematic, with development to be limited to the lower, less steep portion of the site. Provide a public access trail. See OS -lb (Preservation Opportunities), OS -3a (Management of Private Open Space) and CON -12a (Hillside Design Guidelines). NH -70. Access to Open Space. Provide public access to open space areas when projects are approved, including access to and along the shoreline, portions of the Canalfront, and San Quentin Ridge. Minimize public access conflicts with sensitive habitat areas and with nearby development, including parking conflicts. See OS -4a (Access Points). 92 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS Amended 1/13/2016 NH -71. Gathering Places. Support efforts to provide places where neighbors can meet each other, such as at Pickleweed Park, the Community Center, or a public plaza. NH -71a. Development Review Process. Through the development review process, encourage the provision of neighborhood gathering places. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Fees Neighborhood Circulation NH -72. Neighborhood Design. Improve neighborhood entry roads and landscaping, and retain views. NH -72a. Medway Improvements. Complete the design phase and construction of streetscape improvements of the Medway/Canal project funded in part by a grant from the Metropolitan Transportation Commission. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Grants, Fees, Staff Time See CD -8a (Gateways) and CD -9a (Corridor Design Guidelines). NH -73. 1-580/101/Bellam Blvd. Interchange Improvements. Pursue improvement of the I-580/101/Bellam Blvd. interchange. NH -73a. Caltrans. Work with Caltrans on an effective and attractive design for the Highway 101 and I-580 interchange. Responsibility: Public Works, Community Development Timeframe• Long Term Resources: State and Federal Fund, Mitigation Fees Vision of the Canal Waterfront CANAL WATERFRONT The San Rafael Canal, stretching from Albert Park to the Bay, is an underutilized community asset. Existing uses transition from single-family homes and apartments east of Harbor Street, and commercial uses from Harbor Street to Grand Avenue. Most of these commercial uses are marine -oriented, including four marinas, yacht brokerages, boat repair, fishing supplies and commercial fishing operations. Other commercial uses include restaurants, the Montecito Shopping Center, the Harbor Shopping Center, and limited office space. Existing public access to the Canal is limited. Beach Park was improved in conjunction with the renovations at the Seafood Peddler restaurant, and Pickleweed Park has a pathway along the Canalfront. In addition, Montecito Shopping Center and the Grand Landing Office building have walkways along the waterway. Improved public access to and along the Canal, both visual and pedestrian, should be actively promoted through redevelopment of properties between Grand Avenue and Harbor Street. A public promenade on either side of the Canal is a high priority. Water dependent industry will continue to be encouraged, but other pedestrian - oriented services, such as restaurants and retail, will also be allowed on ground floors, and housing allowed above. Live -aboard boats will continue to provide additional affordable housing, while adding to the marine character of the area. Improved access to commercial businesses from the water for boaters will also be encouraged. Maintenance of the Canal as a navigable waterway is essential and will require a local funding source for periodic dredging. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS 93 Neighborhood Economy and Culture NH -74. Community -wide Asset. Promote and improve the San Rafael Canal as a community -wide asset for public and marine related uses, where public access, use and views of the water are maximized, and sensitive wildlife habitat areas are protected. The San Rafael Canal shall be maintained as a navigable waterway. NH -74a. Design Plan and Vision for the Canalfront. Implement the Canalfront Conceptual Design Plan, which was completed in 2010. This vision document includes a list of recommendations to be studied and pursued. Improve circulation and access, including widening the Grand Avenue bridge in order to improve pedestrian and bicvcle circulation. Prepare ., Canal Wa4e -.. ay Vision to dete f. ine the 1.,«,1 , needs of the eommumty, provide saltifiens to iimpr-eve the appeafanee of the Canal and its waterffaR4 ana�o pzublij a,.ees ineluding possible expansionof Be && Bxft. Tka Vision with iner-ehants, esi&rtL', buoixms people, 1.ea4e. .,...a ,.wl live, wer4E near, Responsibility: Community Development, Public Works Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time, State and Federal Grants See NH -79a (Dredging Program). NH -75. Canal Waterfront Uses. Promote marine -related commercial uses west of Harbor Street to serve the recreational and live -aboard boating community. Other commercial uses that encourage pedestrian traffic, such as restaurant and retail uses, will also be allowed on the ground floor. Residential and office uses are allowed above the ground floor. East of Harbor Street, residential uses are to be retained. NH -75a. Zoning Ordinance. Amend the Zoning r,..dina e Maintain zoning provisions to allow non -marine -related and residential uses. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: 51'ijrt To\=Om n _going Resources: Staff Time NH -76. Recreational Boat Facilities. Redevelopment along Existing recreational boat launch facilities along the canal shall not be reduced unless the Canalfront t o the demand those aces no longer exists or adequate substitutes ace can be improve public d fthfacilities l lic access g q p is a major goal o f the provided. Encourage the addition of boat launch facilities, boat trailer parking, and plan. sewage pump -out facilities where appropriate. NH -76a. Maritime Service Demand. Evaluate the market demand for maritime service uses in developing the Canal Waterfront Vision. Responsibility: Community Development, Economic Development, Management Services Timeframe: ShertLong Term Resources: Staff Time 94 SAN RAFAEL 2020 /NEIGHBORHOODS Amended 1/13/2016 NH -76b. Public Boat Launching Facilities. Promote the addition of public boat launching facilities, for example for kayaks at Beach Park or behind Montecito Shopping Center. Responsibility: Community Development, Community Services, Economic Development Timeframe: Long Term Resources: State Lands Mitigation Funds, Property Owners, Partnerships, Concessionaires, Staff Time NH -77. State Lands Commission Title Claims. Continue to resolve public trust title claims with individual property owners and the State Lands Commission in order to assist in the redevelopment of the affected properties. NH -77a. State Lands Commission Title Claims. To assist in redevelopment of affected properties, resolve public trust title claims consistent with State Law Chapter 1742, Statutes of 1971, which allows the City to convey or exchange, subject to approval of the State Lands Commission, certain filled lands which are found to be no longer useful or susceptible to use for the public trust purposes of harbors, commerce, navigation, fisheries, or appurtenances thereto. Responsibility: Economic Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time Neighborhood Design NH -78. Waterfront Design. Require low scale buildings that provide public views of the water and which do not dominate the Canal. Design factors important in reviewing specific development proposals include pedestrian access, building setbacks from the water, height, landscaping, Canal view protection and enhancement, wildlife habitat protection and high quality architectural design. Until a design plan is prepared, new Canalfront buildings and substantial reconstruction of existing buildings and structures should: a. Be set back a minimum of 25 feet from the top of the bank or bulkhead along the Canal for creation of a public promenade, b. Increase public access and public view opportunities, c. Improve access from the water for boaters, where appropriate, d. Locate new structures, or relocate existing structures where feasible, to retain or open up view corridors to the water and activities along the Canal, e. Orient uses and buildings towards the Canal waterfront, including building entries where appropriate, and f. Improve the appearance of the waterfront through excellent design quality. NH -78a. Canalfront Design Guidelines. Prepare, as part of the Canal Waterfront Vision, design guidelines in order to improve the appearance of buildings along the Canal Waterfront and incorporate opportunities for public access. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time, General Fund See program N -74a (Design Plan and Vision for the Canalfront). Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS 95 NH -79. Canal Maintenance. Develop a plan for long-term maintenance of the Canal as a navigable waterway, including regular dredging. Encourage the maintenance of docks and elimination of refuse along the Canal. NH -79a. Dredging Program. Work with property owners to develop a funding program to dredge the Canal. Continue to aggressively pursue a maintenance assessment district, federal funding and other funding sources as available. Responsibility: Public Works, Management Services Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Assessment District, Grants, Federal Funding NH -79b. Boating Sanitation and Dock Safety. Implement the new Boating Sanitation and Dock Safety Ordinance, and encourage reporting of trash issues to Code Enforcement. Require adequate on-site refuse and recycling facilities. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time, Fines See AW -10a (Sanitation Facilities in Boats), AW -10b (Sewage Pump Out Facilities) and AW -10c (Education of Boaters). NH -80. Canal Water Quality. Improve the Canal's water quality through regulation of boating discharges, improve- ment in the quality of storm water runoff, and elimination of refuse along the Canal. NH -80a. Pump -Out Facilities. Support and co-sponsor the provision of marine pump -out facilities. Consider the need for additional pump -out facilities in conjunction with remodeling of existing marinas. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time, Partnerships See also NH -78a (Canalfront Design Guidelines), and AW -7a (Countywide Stormwater Program), AW -7b (Stormwater Runoff Measures) and AW -7c (Water Quality Improvements in Canal and Other Waterways). NH -87. Improvement of Existing Pump Station. Improve the appearance of or relocate the City's pump station along West Francisco Boulevard near the San Rafael Yacht Harbor. NH -81 a. Improved Appearance of Pump Station. Program funds to upgrade the appearance of the pump station at the yacht harbor on West Francisco Blvd. Responsibility: Public Work Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time NH -82. Flood Control Improvements. Coordinate development and redevelopment of uses along the Canal with needed flood control improvements, including levee improvements. NH -82a. Flood Control. Work with the Army Corps of Engineers to prepare a cost- effective flood control program for the Canalfront area. Through development review process, require levee improvements as needed to protect existing and new development. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time, Federal Funds 96 SAN RAFAEL 2020 /NEIGHBORHOODS Amended 1/13/2016 Neighborhood Circulation NH -83. Canal Access. Increase and improve public access to the Canal through creation of a public promenade on either side of the waterfront between Grand Avenue and Harbor Street. Provide an improved pedestrian crossing of the Canal at the Grand Avenue bridge. Pursue a new pedestrian crossing to the east if a cost effective and practical design can be achieved. Attempt to create pedestrian and bicycle access to the Mahon Creek path in conjunction with future freeway modifications. Improve water-based access by recreational boaters to Canalfront businesses. NH -83a. Circulation Improvements. Continue to seek funding opportunities for pedestrian and bicycle enhancements, and include in CIP as funding becomes available. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time, Grants, Partnerships NH -83b. Boat docks. Encourage the provision of boat docks in new commercial development to allow access by boaters to Canal businesses. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees See C -24b (Canal Crossing), C-26 (Bicycle Plan Implementation), C-27 (Pedestrian Plan Implementation), NH -78a (Canalfront Design Guidelines), and CD -5a (Views). CHINA CAMP V i s i o n o f China Camp State Park Future plans for the China Camp State Park, which is located in an unincorporated area of the County, are consistent with State and local priority needs: the park plan calls for continued restoration of the fishing village and an addition of a Chinese Cultural Center, biking, hiking and equestrian trails, and a small boat launch facility. China Camp is in the unincorporated area of the San Rafael Planning Area, located along the northern edge of Point San Pedro Road. The primary land use in this neighborhood is the 1,640 -acre China Camp State Park. China Camp State Park features an historic fishing village, picnic facilities, hiking trails, campsites, and shore fishing. Park rangers reside at the park. Neighborhood Design NH -84. Buck's Landing. Support limited marine and recreational use on this unincorporated site, consistent with Countywide Plan policy. See LU -7 (Land Use Planning in Surrounding Jurisdictions). NH -85. China Camp State Park. Support efforts to upgrade the recreational facilities at China Camp State Park. Collaborate with County and State Park agencies to create, maintain, manage and regulate a system of interconnective trails for pedestrian, equestrian and biking uses between Barbier Park, county open space and China Camp State Park. NH -85a. China Camp State Park. Support efforts of the State to maintain and upgrade China Camp State Park. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS 97 Responsibility: Public Works, Community Services, Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time Vision of the C i v i c C e n t e r The Civic Center Master Plan identifies additional office space and more cultural and entertainment facilities, including a museum. A future transit station with parking is planned on the vacant property located adjacent to Highway 101, across from McInnis Parkway. The area also provides an excellent opportunity for the construction of approximately 200 affordable units. The salt marsh and riparian corridors along branches of Gallinas Creek should be protected, improved, and include public viewing areas where appropriate. CIVIC CENTER Home to the historic Marin County Civic Center complex designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, the neighborhood is developed with single-family homes, condominiums, apartments, offices and commercial uses, a hotel, a dog park, and a post office. The Civic Center complex includes county offices, courts, jail, exhibit hall, auditorium, and a lagoon park. The Marin County Farmer's Market and Marin County Fair are also held on Civic Center grounds. Traffic congestion near the Civic Center was recently improved with the construction of a new intersection at North San Pedro Road and Civic Center Road, featuring two left -turn lanes onto Civic Center Drive. Neighborhood Design The Marin Civic Center is the only public building designed by Frank Lloyd Wright to be built. NH -86. Design Considerations for Development in the Vicinity of the Civic Center. a. Require urban design analysis to assure compatibility of materials, color and building masses with Civic Center. b. Require functional inter -connection with Civic Center. c. Design to complement Civic Center architecture rather than compete. d. Site design should retain vistas where feasible to Mt. Tamalpais. e. Encourage retention of existing historic structures. f. Encourage the County to enhance the Civic Center Drive area with safe and pleasant walkways. g. Encourage the County to have proposals go through Design Review process, and involve North San Rafael community in evaluation of design, etc. *h. Implement the recommendations identified in the Civic Center Station Area Plan completed in 2011. NH -86a. Civic Center Design. Monitor, review and comment on County development related to its properties surrounding and including the Civic Center. Encourage the County to involve the North San Rafael community in the evaluation and review of proposed changes at the Civic Center. Request that the County provide sufficient opportunity for review of major development proposals at the Civic Center by the Design Review Board, Planning Commission and City Council. Implement the recommendations prescribed in the Civic Center Station Area Plan completed in 2011. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time 98 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS Amended 1/13/2016 Neighborhood Economy and Culture NH -87. Civic Center Expansion. Review and comment on plans for future Civic Center expansion projects, including but not limited to, office space and residential units. Support renovations and additions to cultural and entertainment facilities at the Civic Center. See NH -86a (Civic Center Design). Neighborhood Circulation NH -88. Sonoma Marin Area Rail Transit (SMART) Station. if rail sen,ieo io initiatt�, Support construction of a Civic Center SMART station. Encourage a plan that provides high density housing, bus transit connections, a parking lot, and incorporates pedestrian facilities and bicycle access (including bike storage facilities) consistent with the San Rafael Bike and Pedestrian Master Plan. NH -88a. Transit -Oriented Development. Work with SMART, Marin County, Golden Gate Bridge Transit District and other transit providers to prepare a site-specific design for a transit -oriented development with housing in the vicinity of the rail station. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Long Term Resources: General Fund, Grants NH -88b. Safe Walkways and Bikeways. Encourage the provision of lighting and sidewalks to ensure safe and attractive walkways and bikeways from the transit center, on both sides of Civic Center Drive, to the Northgate area. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time NH -89. Bicycle and Pedestrian Walkway. Provide a continuous walkway from the Civic Center to McInnis Park along the railroad, consistent with the San Rafael Bike and Pedestrian Master Plan. See C -24a (North San Rafael Promenade), C -27a (Implementation) and C -27b (Prioritizing Pedestrian Improvements). NH -90. Bus Pads. Improve the safety for transit riders walking and biking to the bus pads on Highway 101 at Freitas Interchange. NH -90a. Improved Pedestrian Safety at Bus Pads. Work with Golden Gate Transit to provide for safer bus pad locations and design. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time NH -91. Bike Path. Create a bike path between Dominican/Black Canyon and the Civic Center, from Villa Avenue to San Pablo Avenue, along Highway 101. See C-26 (Bicycle Plan Implementation), C-27 (Pedestrian Plan Improvements). Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS 99 NH -92. North San Rafael Promenade. Support construction cf the terminus of the Promenade to Civic Center Drive as described in the North San Rafael Vision Promenade Conceptual Plan. See C-27 V i s i o n o f Country Club Country Club, located in an unincorporated area of the County, is one of San Rafael's older neighborhoods, and is not expected to change much. Annexation of some properties into the City may occur consistent with LAFCO policies. V i s i o n o f D o m i n i c a n/ B l a c k C a n y o n Preserve and enhance the residential and historic character of the neighborhood and its natural habitats. Little change is expected in the neighborhood. While the neighborhood is virtually built -out, new residential development may occur primarily on the remaining vacant or subdivided lots. Long-standing priorities for the residents include developing a neighborhood park and playground opportunities; minimizing impacts of University facilities, activities and events on surrounding residential areas; and reducing the impact of the freeway on the neighborhood, including installation of landscaping and sound reduction material along the freeway sound wall. The Dominican University Master Use Permit allows for the future construction of a chapel, a science and technology building, parking areas and a new soccer field. Additional student and staff housing may also be needed in the future. Plan Improvements), C -24a (North San Rafael Promenade). COUNTRY CLUB The Country Club Neighborhood is primarily an unincorporated area of the City featuring large single-family homes on hillside lots. The incorporated portion of the neighborhood, located along the San Rafael Creek, is developed with single-family homes and condominiums. NH -93. Marin Yacht Club Tennis Courts Site. Encourage the retention of needed recreation uses. Any future reuse of the site should be residential, compatible with the surrounding neighborhood. See LU -2a (Development Review). DOMINICAN/BLACK CANYON The Dominican -Black Canyon neighborhood is primarily developed with single-family homes, a number of which are historic and unique in character, as well as some duplexes and condominiums. The neighborhood is defined by its large and abundant trees, landscaped yards, and generally forested character. Residents of the neighborhood enjoy a pleasant residential setting and wealth of outdoor beauty. The Dominican hills and Barbier Park/Gold Hill, which form the northern and eastern boundary of the neighborhood, feature native landscape and trails that provide spectacular views of the City and surrounding area. Creeks also provide important natural riparian habitats. Highway 101 and its sound walls form the western boundary of the neighborhood. Within the neighborhood, there are two long-standing community institutions. The Convent of Dominican Sisters has been located here since 1889, and in 1915 the sisters opened what was later to become Dominican University. Recent Master Use Permit approvals for the University have resulted in upgrades to existing facilities, including landscape and parking lot improvements, and the construction of student housing and a recreation center featuring a gym and a pool. The Marin Ballet, Marin Tennis Club, and Coleman School are also located within the neighborhood boundaries. 100 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS Amended 1/13/2016 Neighborhood Economy and Culture NH -94. Dominican University. Construction of new facilities at Dominican University should be consistent with the approved Master Use Permit, including the Events Management Plan contained therein and any subsequent approvals. Require a Use Permit Amendment for any new housing units. Impacts of University facilities, activities and events on the residential neighborhood should be minimized. Continue to foster a cooperative relationship between the University's students, faculty and visitors and neighborhood residents through efforts such as the Dominican University Neighborhood Advisory Committee. NH -94a. Dominican University. Monitor compliance with the Master Use Permit and Events Management Plan, and amend as necessary. As needed, participate in the Neighborhood Advisory Committee process. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time, Fees mlvv",; NH -94b. University Housing. Amend the Zoning Ordinance to allow residential uses. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: She Long Term Resources: Staff Time Neighborhood Design NH -95. Barbier Park/Gold Hill. (Deleted) Ceu-Ay Opp cr dee beyond and .,long "Gold Hill Cr ,"a foe read th mi impat4ant a:r.xuxib, a ifiJ �ti3 � NH -95a. Barbier Park/Gold Hill. (Deleted) Redesignate the zening of +"c lvrlalal; TiMe f-afRe. Sh 4 Tor , Resources: Staff Time NH -96. Dominican University Hillside Area. The largest undeveloped parcel in the neighborhood is the approximately 24 acres of hillside land owned by Dominican University (located east of the campus). This area is mostly very steep, is heavily wooded, contains a significant riparian area and provides an important and heavily used fire road connection between the Country Club neighborhood and the Gold Hill/Barbier Park open space. Any future University use of this area should be planned through an amendment to the University's Master Use Permit. The permitted density should reflect the significant site constraints. NH -96a. Development Review Process. Through the development review process, apply the Hillside Design Guidelines to design of housing at the site. Involve the neighborhood in the planning and review process of proposed development. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time, Fees Dominican University opened in 1917. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS 101 NH -97. Park or Recreation Facilities. Pursue opportunities to provide a neighborhood park and/or recreation facilities in Dominican/Black Canyon. See PR -9a (New Parks). NH -98. Freeway Sound Wall. Encourage Caltrans to maintain landscapinge along the freeway sound wall and to incorporate sound -deadening technology. NH -98a. Freeway Improvements. In reviewing plans for freeway projects, encourage adequate landscaping and use of sound -deadening materials on the sound wall and/or the roadway surface. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time See N -6f (Widening of US 101 and 580). Neighborhood Circulation NH -99. Dominican University Traffic and Parking. Minimize traffic and on -street parking impacts of Dominican University activities and events on surrounding residential areas and assure that appropriate on -campus parking is provided. See NH -94a (Dominican University) and C-31 (Residential Area Parking). Vision of Fairhills This neighborhood, essentially built -out, may see the future development of single-family homes on the few vacant hillside lots. Marin Academy will continue to upgrade its facilities. FAIRHILLS The Fairhills neighborhood, located in central San Rafael, is primarily developed with large, single-family homes on hillside lots. The Neighborhood 13/14 Plan was adopted for Fairhills and Sun Valley in 1980 and became the precursor for the City's Hillside Design Guidelines that were adopted in 1991. Other features of the neighborhood include the Red Rock Quarry, a visually significant topographic feature, and the Marin Academy, a major and historic feature of the neighborhood. Boyd Park provides recreational opportunities for residents of the neighborhood. Neighborhood Homes NH -100. New Development. Retain the existing character of the neighborhood, including both historic homes and the natural setting, by: • Maintaining the authentic historic value and ambiance of the neighborhood's older housing, • Assuring that new development and significant remodeling respect and enhance the character of surrounding housing, and • Protecting hillside areas by clustering new development where appropriate to maximize open space preservation and by carefully evaluating the location, size 102 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS Amended 1/13/2016 and height of new structures, road design and adequacy for safety vehicles, grading, structural foundations, surface and sub -soil drainage, excavation, earthfills, and other operations, in order to avoid buildings which are excessively visible or out of scale, soil erosion, scarring of the natural landscape, obstruction of scenic vistas from public vantage points, or loss of natural vegetation and wildlife habitat. NH -100a. Development Review Process. Through the development review process, apply the Hillside Design Guidelines to the design of new housing. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees FRANCISCO BOULEVARD WEST Since the early 1980s, the Francisco Boulevard West commercial area has benefited from significant large-scale development such as Toys R Us and Borders Books and Shamrock (CompUSA) retail centers, and Sonnen Motors. These specialty retail uses are important because they are major sources of retail sales tax revenue for the City. Retention of the existing industrial areas (between Woodland and the freeway frontage parcels), given the lack of replacement industrial areas in San Rafael and the importance of such uses to San Rafael's economy and job base, has been, and will continue to be, an important planning issue in this neighborhood. The Francisco Boulevard West area is predominantly developed with auto, building related, specialty retail, and manufacturing/wholesale uses. The area is also the oldest industrial area in the City. Completed in 1998, the Andersen Drive Extension improved the area's accessibility and provided important new links between East San Rafael, Francisco Boulevard West, and Downtown. The Francisco Boulevard West neighborhood is adjacent to the residential areas of Picnic Valley, California Park and Bret Harte, along Woodland Avenue. Neighborhood Economy and Culture NH -101. Industrial Uses. Protect and concentrate building industry and automotive service industry land uses which are currently located in this area due to the area's central Marin County location and lack of alternate locations south of Puerto Suello Hill. The most appropriate locations for such uses are on both sides of Andersen Drive south of Mahon Creek. Protect and maintain availability of sites for existing building industry land uses important to San Rafael's economy and needed for the convenience of its residents and businesses. V i s i o n o f Francisco Blvd . West Improving the appearance of the area as an attractive entryway to the City and from surrounding neighborhoods will continue to be a City priority in this area. The Highway 101 widening project has resulted in acquiring and consolidating private properties along Francisco Boulevard, eliminating older buildings, and will offer opportunities for a sidewalk and consistent landscape treatment along Francisco Boulevard. Encourage preservation of existing industrial (including light industrial) uses, except along the Highway 101 frontage, where redevelopment of sites with high tax generating, specialty retail uses need highway visibility. Retention of the auto and building related services will continue to be important because they are found primarily in the City's Francisco Boulevard West and the Canal neighborhoods. This industrial area is unique because the properties are medium sized, and are typically occupied with a single tenant in a building that cannot be duplicated under current development standards. Street tree programs and project design review address the need to improve the appearance of industrial uses near neighborhoods and along major transportation corridors. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS 103 Fswo 2 The Anders'ert and Francisco area is at the crossroads of highways 101 580. See LU -9a (Nonresidential Zoning), LU -15a (Land Use Compatibility), LU -17a (Building and Automotive Services), LU -18a (Retail and Service Uses in Industrial and Office Areas), EV -2a (Business Retention) and EV -8a (Industrial Zoning). NH -102. Industrial Area and Design Improvement. Upgrade building design and landscaping as redevelopment or remodeling occurs. Evaluate the design of projects considering views from the Bret Harte neighborhood, the proposed rail transitway, and Andersen Drive, with particular attention paid to rooftop design and screening of mechanical equipment. New building facades facing Andersen Drive and the proposed rail transitway should be given design attention equal to that of any front fagade. NH -102a. Development Review Process. Use the development review process to encourage design and use consistent with this policy. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Fees NH -103. Specialty Retail Uses. Upgrade and redevelop portions of the Francisco Boulevard West area visible from Highway 101 with specialty retail commercial uses that can capitalize on the Highway 101 frontage and visibility, while minimizing traffic impacts. Specialty retail uses include automobile sales, bulk retail sales, region -serving retail uses, and hotels. Encourage relocation of manufacturing and storage uses from highway frontage locations, and consolidation of parcels for greater design flexibility NH -103a. Development of Properties along Highway voL�� 101. For properties visible from Highway 101 where �o significant redevelopment and upgrading is needed, assist ,\ Gc cooperative development efforts among property owners to assemble individual parcels. Responsibility: Community Development, -1- - - - - Economic Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees See LU -2a. (Development Review). FB NH -104. Existing Retail Centers e - r Upgrade. Facilitate the upgrade of existing retail centers (Graham and Rice Centers) at the crossroads of Andersen Drive, RSPB /` Highway 101 and the future transitway with improved Dr11g, ac -uN ,-attu 6apn g and building design improvements (including rooftop Blvd. screening), in keeping with their key entryway location. and NH -104a. Development Review Process. Use the development review process to encourage design and use consistent with this policy. Provide assistance in assembling lots at shopping center sites located at the crossroads of Andersen Drive, Highway 101 and Francisco Blvd. West where these actions would result in substantial upgrading of the properties and redevelopment with desired uses. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Fees See LU -9 (Intensity of Nonresidential Development). 104 SAN RAFAEL 2020 /NEIGHBORHOODS Amended 1/13/2016 NH -105. Unused Portions of the SMART Right -of -Way. Encourage use, while ensuring protection of any adjacent wetland habitat, of the unused portions of the SMART right-of-way, including the section between Downtown and the Larkspur ferry terminal, to facilitate desired redevelopment of adjacent parcels and an easement for the North-South bikeway. N11 -105a. Development Review Process. Use the development review process to encourage design and use consistent with this policy. Provide assistance in assembling lots where these actions would result in substantial upgrading of the properties and redevelopment with desired uses. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Fees NH -106. Land Uses Near Residential Areas. Design new or redeveloped properties facing Woodland Avenue to create a transition between residential uses west of Woodland and heavier industrial uses in the area. Encourage light industrial uses that minimize adverse impacts. Give special attention to landscape screening of buildings and outdoor storage and to screening rooftop equipment given rooftop visibility from higher elevations. NH -106a. Development Review Process. Use the development review process to encourage design and use consistent with this policy. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Fees NH -107. Office Uses. Discourage office uses except for existing small office uses and those that are ancillary to retail or industrial uses. New office complexes shall not be allowed. See LU -2a (Development Review). Neighborhood Circulation NH -108. Entries into Bret Harte Neighborhood. Encourage better landscaping, pedestrian sidewalks and building fagade upgrades on major streets leading into the Bret Harte neighborhood, including Woodland Avenue, Irwin Street, Lovell Avenue, Lindaro Avenue and DuBois Street. See LU -2a (Development Review). NH -109. Andersen Drive Access. Continue to minimize vehicular access points to Andersen Drive to maintain maximum traffic flow. See LU -2a (Development Review). NH -110. Highway 101 Widening Project. Improve the appearance of the area as an entryway from Highway 101. Provide a consistent landscape treatment along the frontage road, including large street trees and landscape berms to screen parking areas. See LU -2a (Development Review). Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS 105 V is i on of G e r s t I e P a r k Gerstle Park is a unique, historic and walkable neighborhood in close proximity to Downtown. It is essentially built -out and will remain a very diverse and active residential neighborhood with relatively little change. Opportunities should be taken to visually upgrade or replace apartment buildings to be more compatible with the historic neighborhood design character, preserve historic structures and architectural character, reduce impacts of through -traffic on neighborhood streets, and restore adequate parking on neighborhood streets. Neighborhood issue parking, excessive through -traffic, adec preservation, and pr GERSTLE PARK Gerstle Park developed as San Rafael's first residential neighborhood in the 1800s. The neighborhood in the 19th century included summer homes for wealthy San Franciscans who used these dwellings only a few months of the year. The early 1900s saw the development of working class bungalows and Arts and Crafts homes, many of which have survived. Located south of, and adjacent to, San Rafael's downtown business district, the neighborhood's northern boundary is formed by the transition of commercial to residential land use. A mix of housing including single-family, duplex and multifamily units has been built on the flat portion of the neighborhood. The residential density and architectural character of the neighborhood was altered in the 1950s and 1960s when some of the older, historic homes were replaced by apartment buildings. However, the area still retains one of San Rafael's largest concentrations of Victorian and turn -of -the -century homes. The Gerstle Park neighborhood has one of the highest residential housing densities in San Rafael. The neighborhood includes the six -acre Gerstle Park, Short School Elementary School and a mixture of residential architectural styles. s that need to be addressed are traffic problems such as lack of .peed and protection of neighborhood streets from the impacts of uate drainage, maintenance of streets and sidewalks, historic ivate property maintenance. Neighborhood Homes NH -111. New Development. Preserve and enhance the residential and historic character of the Gerstle Park neighborhood by: • Protecting the existing mixed residential area, strictly limiting rezoning to higher densities, • Prohibiting additional nonresidential development in Gerstle Park except as allowed in zoning regulations, • Protecting hillside ridges and the visual backdrop of the ridges fringing the neighborhood, • Preserving historic homes by encouraging new development or significant remodels that enhance the historic architectural character of the neighborhood, • Requiring that adjacent Downtown land use designations and developments are compatible with and do not negatively affect the neighborhood and that sensitive transitions occur where Downtown development abuts neighborhood residences. NH -lila. Development Review Process. Use the development review process to encourage design and use consistent with this policy. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Fees See NH -la (Neighborhood Planning Process), CD- IOb (Compatibility of Patterns), CA -13a (Inventory Update) and CA -13b (Preservation Ordinance). 106 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS Amended 1/13/2016 Neighborhood Design NH -112. Architectural Design. Preserve and enhance the distinctive design character of the neighborhood, including historic design features. See Community Design and Historic Preservation programs. NH -113. Albert Park. Improve the street fagade and entryway of Albert Park. Consider the addition of a public pool. See PR -7a (Community Park Improvements) and PR -1 lb (Public Pool). NH -114. Mahon Creek. Preserve and enhance Mahon Creek. See CON -8a (Creek Restoration), CON -8b (Tree Retention) and LU -2a (Development Review). Neighborhood Circulation NH -115. Pedestrian Linkages and Landscaping. Improve bicycle and pedestrian linkages and landscape treatment of major entry roads from the Downtown area, such as B, C, and D Streets. NH -115a. Pedestrian Improvements. Provide landscaping improvements along B, C and D Streets. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time See C -26a (Bicycle Plan Implementation). GLENWOOD The Glenwood neighborhood, located along the Point San Pedro Peninsula, is developed with single-family homes. The open space hills above the housing developments constitute about 50 percent of the neighborhood land area and are adjacent to China Camp State Park. Most of the homes are part of the same development so they share similar characteristics and architectural style. Centers within the neighborhood include Glenwood School and Victor Jones Park. Gerstle Park is known for its many well-preserved older homes. Vision of Glenwood This neighborhood is a built -out community, which will remain developed with single-family residences. Very little change is anticipated. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS 107 Lincoln/San Rafael Hill Lincoln Avenue, a transportation artery for San Rafael, bisects the neighborhood. The street connects north and central San Rafael via Los Ranchitos Road over Puerto Suello Hill. The mixed-use neighborhood, one of the oldest neighborhoods in San Rafael, consists of single-family homes, apartments, condominiums, offices, hotels, social services, and a neighborhood delicatessen. These uses serve a diverse population. Many offices along Lincoln Avenue are converted single-family homes from the 1980s. Buildings in the Lincoln Neighborhood have a variety of architectural styles. Boyd Park provides recreational opportunities for the residents. Planning issues in the neighborhood are traffic congestion, traffic speed and safety, parking on hillside streets, and limited parking along Lincoln Avenue. Neighborhood Homes NH -116. Lincoln Avenue. Maintain low-density development in the hillside areas, consistent with the existing density and environmental constraints. Allow higher density residential development along Lincoln Avenue between Hammondale Court and Mission Avenue given its good access to public transit. Promote lot consolidations to achieve higher densities while providing adequate on-site parking and circulation and minimizing ingress/egress to Lincoln Avenue; V i s i o n o f minimize additional office conversions of residential sites; L i n c o l n/ S a n R a f a e I maintain 15 -foot setbacks and street trees as corridor H i I I amenities to provide a landscaped streetscape. The following are more specific policies for Lincoln Avenue: The future vision of the Lincoln -San Rafael a. Promote high-density residential development along Hill neighborhood is a balanced approach Lincoln Avenue, consistent with its existing character to addressing the area's unique issues. and good access to public transit. Encourage The neighborhood is zoned as a mixed- redevelopment of these sites for residential use, use area of single-family homes, consistent with the surrounding neighborhood. apartments, condominiums, offices, Encourage lot consolidations to achieve more efficient rehabilitation facilities and businesses. The redevelopment project designs. Encourage area has a variety of architectural styles underground parking for any new or substantial and history with a relatively dense and redevelopment project along Lincoln Avenue. diverse population. Perspectives reflecting b. Prohibit additional office conversions of residential the future of this Neighborhood have to units in residential/office areas except for mixed include the hillside areas of San Rafael Hill office/residential projects where the same or additional with those along Lincoln Ave. This residential units are provided. Prohibit retail uses. neighborhood may also experience limited c. Design all new projects and substantial remodels in infill development along Lincoln Avenue accordance with Noise Element policies. with the redevelopment of single-family d. Require setbacks and other project design features that visually reduce the wall effect along Lincoln Avenue. home lots, a nursery and existing motels. Encourage underground parking in new development to reduce building mass and height. See N -la (Neighborhood Planning Process). NH -117. Neighborhood Park. Pursue opportunities to provide a neighborhood park in the Lincoln/San Rafael Hill neighborhood. See PR -9 (New Parks). 108 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS Amended 1/13/2016 LOCH LOMOND The Loch Lomond neighborhood is primarily developed with single-family homes on hillside lots or lots along the Bay. The hills above the neighborhood provide hiking trails and access to Harry A. Barbier Memorial Park. The neighborhood is home to the Loch Lomond Marina and Shopping Center. This extraordinary site includes neighborhood -serving shops and a market, but is primarily a 550 -slip marina. The long breakwater offers unique pedestrian access along the bay front and striking views of the San Francisco and San Rafael bays, San Rafael -Richmond Bridge, Mt. Tamalpais, and the Marin Islands National Wildlife Refuge — artists are drawn to the site to capture the Bay vista. To the east and west of the site are wetlands that support all manner of wildlife. The marina includes boat slips, a yacht club, a public boat launching facility, boat storage, and a restaurant. Neighborhood Design NH -118. Loch Lomond Marina. Vision of Loch Lomond The Loch Lomond Shopping Center and Marina may be redeveloped to feature neighborhood -serving and marine -related retail and service uses including a market, neighborhood serving offices, residential units, and a restaurant. The marina should continue to feature boat slips, a yacht club and a public boat launching facility. Redevelopment of the site will protect the existing marsh and wetland areas and will be designed to be compatible with the surroundina residential uses. Retain the Loch Lomond Marina uses, and enhance recreational use of the marina waterfront. Preserve and improve access to the marina and the water's edge as a welcoming place for the public to enjoy the boating activities and the waterfront. As the focal point of the site, the marina shall continue to be a distinct, accessible area. If the property owner proposes to redevelop the site, create a beautiful waterfront development that maximizes the site's location facing San Francisco Bay, consistent with the following guidelines and requirements: a. Land Use. Encourage a mixed-use development that includes all of the following land uses: • Marina and marina -support facilities, with boat berths, a public boat launch, day use boat trailer parking, a yacht club, boat retail and services, amenities for boaters, restaurant and shops, and parking. Sufficient dry boat storage to meet the needs of local residents should be retained. • Waterfront -oriented recreation along the marina, spits and breakwater. Recreational activities include picnicking, kite flying, walking, biking, fishing, bird watching, and enjoying the views. For example, bird -watching and fishing opportunities should be enhanced. Access for fishing should be provided in a way that extends a welcome to visitors. • Neighborhood -serving commercial uses that meet the needs of residents and visitors in the area should be included for their convenience and for trip reduction. • Residential, with a mix of housing types, that meets design and housing objectives. To increase the affordability of market -rate units, a majority of the Loch Lomond Marina could be improved to provide better community amenities. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS 109 dwelling units on the property shall be attached housing and/or small single- family homes. The different types of housing should be integrated into one neighborhood, and should be designed to be compatible with the marina and recreational uses. Because of the limited area for marine uses on the site, residential use is not allowed in the Marine Related District. In order to accommodate the optimal site plan for the marina and housing, the land use district boundaries on the site shall be considered approximate and may be adjusted through the master plan for the Planned District zoning. b. Site Design. Achieve an extraordinary design in an innovative development that enhances the neighborhood, San Rafael, and the bayfront. New development should draw inspiration from the marina and waterfront, provide a community gathering place with neighborhood shopping and recreational opportunities, and include attractive housing, consistent with the following guidelines: 1. Views of the marina and waterfront should draw people into the site and retain their value to the surrounding community. • The view to the waterfront down the entryway into the site at the Lochinvar intersection is the major public view corridor. To enhance this corridor and to achieve an open, welcoming and inviting entrance to the marina, this corridor may include street right-of-way, open space and parking. Buildings adjacent to the view corridor should be lower scale, or incorporate larger setbacks or stepbacks of upper floors. • The frontage along Pt. San Pedro Road should be warm and welcoming, encouraging access through the site's principal entryway. • Buildings should be carefully sited and designed to enhance or minimize impacts to views of the Bay, the Marin Islands, wetlands and the marina. 2. Improved pedestrian and bicycle access through the site to the marina and breakwater should be part of the site's design. 3. A recreational area along the waterfront should be included to differentiate the marina functions from the new neighborhoods. This public area shall serve as a community -gathering place, and provide activities accessible to children and adults both in the immediate neighborhood and in the surrounding area. A play area with playground equipment suitable for preschool and elementary school ages, with a water play feature, is recommended, and an active recreational area such as a sports court (i.e., bocce ball or volleyball) is desired. 4. The streets and alleyways should be designed for slow driving speeds, and there should be an enhanced transit stop on Pt. San Pedro Road. NH -118a. Project Design and Review. a. Require early conceptual design review by the Design Review Board and the Planning Commission. Encourage applicants to present alternative proposals for conceptual review in that design review. b. Prior to submitting a proposal, the property owner must confer with Federal, State and local agencies (such as Bay Conservation and Development Commission, Association of Bay Area Government's Bay Trails Project, U.S. Fish and Wildlife) with responsibility for the Bay. c. The neighborhood residents and homeowner associations shall be informed and consulted on major design issues throughout the process. !j. --Require a mixed-use parking analysis to establish adequate parking requirements; require photomontage analyses as part of the evaluation of view impacts; and, require a wetlands delineation. d-. e. Carry out the Village at Loch Lomond mixed-use development project approved in 2007, which was designed to address the recommendations of this program. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Fees 110 SAN RAFAEL 2020 /NEIGHBORHOODS Amended 1/13/2016 NH -118b. Common Area Maintenance. Continue to maintain Dublicly- V i s i o n o f accessible Darks, shoreline areas and marina Breen throueh resources M a r i n w o o d provided by development within the established Mello -Roos (assessment) Vision f A district. s part , fthe develo�l��nt°Y�Y�iri rrJ�iaJ� aid of � Lucas Val l I I e y ;otoe�r.\ ia.2 Responsibility: Community Development Apart from the County's Timeframe: Short Term approval of office space at Resources: Fees the Lueasfilm properties, this area, located in an NH -118c. Bird -watching. Facilitate the implementation of approved unincorporated area of the Droiects that include permanent open space areas and Drovide viewing areas County is not expecting any and sianaQe for bird-watchine. Enea...age the developer to p , vide o major development projects retive a -ad to during the San Rafael 2020 a; k-,,.Mng a satellite , t etration at A -e T �`��a �»a�a V planning period. Feeenvnendations on eeded f4eilities. \ and proposed development Responsibility: Community Development will occur within the County. Timeframe: Short Term This agreement seeks Resources: Fees dedication of the right-of-way V i s i o n o f LUCAS VALLEY Marin Islands This 1,629 acre unincorporated neighborhood is developed with single- Preservation of the Marin family homes on large lots and incidental retail. With more than 50 Islands is essential to the percent of the neighborhood located in an open space reserve, the community of San Rafael population density is low at 1.22 persons per acre. The Lucas Valley and therefore will remain Open Space Preserve is located above the developed portions of the uninhabited. neighborhood MARIN ISLANDS The East and West Marin Islands in the San Rafael Bay both have V i s i o n o f land use designations of Hillside Resource Residential but are M a r i n w o o d uninhabited. The Islands are noted for their visually pleasing appeal, Marinwood is in an especially during the bird -breeding season. They are preserved for unincorporated area of the wildlife habitat as the Marin Islands National Wildlife Refuge and State County. The Daphne site, Ecological Reserve. located west of Highway 101 NH -119. Marin Islands. next to the Lucas Valley off - ramp, is a property zoned for Oppose d&velepment of Maintain islands as open space. except residential development. €e -that activities necessary for monitoring or enhancement of the The City and County have wildlife habitat and which does not degrade the habitat may be entered into an agreement allowed. Encourage removal of existing buildings. whereby the City will not NH -119a. Rezone Marin Islands. (Deleted) fcrin [MhF:ds4o seek to annex the property Orim lip and proposed development sol 1!ik ;a�:n�uni y lv.�t will occur within the County. T�w_e_4afne: ShE)F4 Te fm This agreement seeks Resa r-ees. Sta ff Tiffie dedication of the right-of-way for completion of the freeway MARINWOOD off -ramp and maintenance of the City's traffic standards. The Marinwood neighborhood is located in an unincorporated portion of the San Rafael Planning Area. The neighborhood is a single-family Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS 111 community with incidental retail. The Marinwood Community Center and the adjacent Marinwood Open Space provide recreational opportunities for residents of the neighborhood. Neighborhood Homes NH -120. Daphne Property. Development of the property should be at densities consistent with Hillside Residential. Development shall be clustered to minimize impacts. Proposed development shall provide noise setbacks consistent with City standards, retention of community -wide visual resources, including preservation of hillside and ridgeline views, and creek side setbacks. Consistent with prior agreements with the County, annexation shall not be required, although development must receive approval of traffic allocation from the City. Land needed for planned highway interchange improvements should be acquired, ideally through the development review process. Vision of M o n t e c i t o/ H a p p y V a I I e y In the year 2020, our distinct neighborhood is a beautiful and desirable place with a diversity of architecture and a variety of uses within easy walking distance. There are central gathering places where people meet each other to visit and hold events. Our pleasant, tree shaded, narrow streets are safe to walk and drive along and we see fewer cars. We are a community which works together to keep our neighborhood secure, clean and attractive, and to celebrate our diversity (From Montecito/Happy Valley Neighborhood Plan) Future land uses should be stabilized to keep the existing mix of uses, with zoning to protect the existing uses and to minimize additional development. There is satisfaction with the mix of retail, service, office and other uses in the commercial areas. The High School's bus and maintenance yard site on Union Street may become housing, also meeting the neighborhood's goals for a new outdoor gathering place and improving the appearance of Union Street while minimizing adverse impacts to the neighborhood. There are several opportunities for adding and improving gathering places and for better recreational opportunities, particularly at the High School. See LU -7 (Land Use Planning in Surrounding Jurisdictions). MONTECITO/HAPPY VALLEY The area known as Montecito/Happy Valley is one of San Rafael's oldest neighborhoods. Today, most of the area is built out. There have been numerous upgrades, including a late 1980s remodel of the Montecito Shopping Center with a new front facade and a walkway along the San Rafael Canal. The area offers a wide variety of housing, business opportunities and community services. The residential area contains many large historic homes (several of architectural significance), cottages, duplexes and diverse apartments, as well as being home to San Rafael High School. The neighborhood's commercial anchor is Montecito Shopping Center, one of San Rafael's larger centers, complete with a canalfront walkway. There are two community supermarkets on Third Street. Along Irwin Street, a gateway to San Rafael, several large office buildings offer businesses a high profile to commuters on Highway 101. Fourth Street provides a commercial link to Downtown with a wide range of office, service and retail uses. In addition, many social service agencies make their home in Montecito because of the easy accessibility to the rest of San Rafael. 112 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS Amended 1/13/2016 Neighborhood Homes NH -121. Mix of Housing. Preserve the current mix of single family, duplex, medium and high density housing in the residential areas. See LU -14a (Land Use Compatibility). NH -122. San Rafael City School's Corporation Yard on Union Street. Encourage the redevelopment of the School District's bus/maintenance yard with attractive multifamily housing for seniors and/or school district staff. Neighborhood childcare should be retained on the site. The project should also include a children's playground designed for use by the residents and the neighborhood. Development of this site should improve and retain views from the end of Fourth Street to the facade of the San Rafael High School building. See LU -2a (Development Review). Neighborhood Economy and Culture NH -123. Commercial areas. Retain existing mixed-use land categories and zoning districts in the commercial areas. Consistent with these districts, encourage active ground floor and retail uses on Fourth Street. See LU -2a (Development Review). NH -124. Improved Recreation. Create and improve neighborhood recreational opportunities and facilities. NH -124. Neighborhood Park. Provide a neighborhood park with appropriate play structures and activities for young children. Potential park site locations include the School District's corporation yard and the San Rafael High School site, possibly at the south end of the football field along Third Street or by the tennis courts along Mission Avenue. Consistent with City recreation policies, should San Rafael High School ever be closed or sold, attempt to secure the continued public use of existing high school recreation facilities, and provide neighborhood park facilities. Responsibility: Community Services Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Park In -Lieu Fees, Grants, Dedications See PR -9a (New Parks). Neighborhood Design NH -125. Design Blend. Continue to provide a blend of architecture styles in the Montecito/Happy Valley Neighborhood compatible with and retaining the character of attractive older buildings. Newer buildings should be well designed, blend well with the existing homes and provide a "pedestrian friendly" street front. See LU -2a (Development Review). Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS 113 Neighborhood Circulation NH -126. Traffic Control. Enhance and design streets to provide for appropriate traffic control. NH -126a. San Rafael High School Access. Work with the school district to improve safety and effectiveness of drop-off areas at San Rafael High School. Encourage continued communication and cooperation to address improvements to access.Review the design and- impleinef4ation of an improved a.ent entranee -eFfPt. ca. P�-dre Road ti fm, Rafe Se eel as well ., safer- and up -and aver off areas ineluding btA not lifnited to the afea in ffent of the gym. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time NH -127. Fourth Street. Ensure that Fourth Street provides a "pedestrian -oriented" walking street connection to Downtown. The Fourth Street view of the High School should be reestablished and improved with landscaping and fencing. NH -127a. Fourth Street Enhancement. Through the development review process, encourage improvements that extend Fourth Street concrete benches/trash can/ landscape/ elegant sign treatment to east end of Fourth Street. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time NH -128. Sidewalk Improvements. Provide sidewalks that are safe and attractive to walk along. NH -128a. Sidewalk Improvements. Prepare a Pedestrian Plan, identifying pedestrian right-of-ways. Using information from the neighborhood, further develop a list of sidewalks and paths for parts of Park, Jewell, Belle, one side of Union, and along the perimeter of the High School. Add safe crosswalks and striping where needed for pedestrian safety, and posting of speed limits on streets such as Grand, Park and Union. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Assessment District, Property Owners NH -129. Neighborhood Parking. Provide street parking that is convenient and does not dominate the neighborhood. Require that all new residential developments provide for attractive and adequate off- street parking. NH -129a. Neighborhood Parking. To improve parking in the neighborhood, conduct a parking survey to further evaluate specific parking problems and identify possible solutions that allow for street parking that does not dominate the neighborhood, such as: • Working with apartment owners to restore parking spaces being used for storage. • Working with property owners to add on-site parking where feasible. • Adding "no parking" signs where street clearance is too narrow for emergency vehicles to get through. • Evaluating the benefits and drawbacks of a Permit Parking Program, i.e., to limit cars per unit or to limit nonresident cars. • Considering time-limited parking areas. Responsibility: Public Works 114 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS Amended 1/13/2016 Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time, Assessment District NH -130. Commercial Parking. Require well -landscaped commercial parking lots that are safe and convenient for pedestrians. NH -130a. Commercial Public Parking in Montecito. If funding sources can be obtained, use the development review process to implement this policy. For example, encourage better use of the easternmost Montecito parking lot by designing better access from the lot to the shopping center, or requiring employees to park in this lot. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Short Term Funding: Fees See LU -2a (Development Review). MONT MARIN/SAN RAFAEL PARK The Mont Marin/San Rafael Park Neighborhood is a suburban neighborhood located in North San Rafael. Most of the homes in this neighborhood are owner -occupied. A significant open space ridge is located along the eastern boundary of the neighborhood. Jerry Russom Memorial Park is located along the western boundary of the neighborhood, providing access to the Terra Linda/Sleepy Hollow Divide Open Space Preserve. The Mont Marin/San Rafael Park neighborhood experiences Highway 101 bypass traffic, which has decreased since Las Gallinas Avenue was narrowed to one lane each way to accommodate new bike lanes. NORTH SAN RAFAEL COMMERCIAL CENTER The North San Rafael Commercial Center includes the Northgate "Town Center" area, the Northgate Business Park, and the offices and YMCA located on Los Gamos Road. The Town Center area includes the Northgate One shopping center, the Northgate Mall, and the Northgate Three Shopping Center. This area is developed predominantly with retail and office uses. The Northgate Business Park, located east of Highway 101, is developed with a mix of office and industrial uses, providing spaces suited to small businesses and startup companies that comprise an important part of San Rafael's economy. V i s i o n o f M o n t M a r i n/ San Rafael Park The Mont Marin/San Rafael Park Neighborhood is essentially built -out with little change expected. V i s i o n o f North San Rafael C o m m e r c i a l C e n t e r One of the key concepts in Vision North San Rafael is the development of a "town center" in the heart of the Northgate commercial area. As described in the Vision: A "town center" is a focal point where the values and history of the community are expressed and supported, where community identity is strengthened and neighborhood cohesion is fostered. It is a place where residents and workers can gather—formally and informally—to share community life. The Town Center will have public art, a wide variety of unique shops, many places to eat, and a number of entertainment options. Our town center will be a major destination point on the promenade, a place where everyone feels welcome, something is always happening, and strolling is a pleasure. It will also include one of North San Rafael's principal gathering places—in the form of a town square! Over time, the Town Center would change, expand and evolve to become the heart of the North San Rafael community. The priority actions for the Town Center are to create a sense of enclosure, pedestrian -scale and easy accessibility and to provide high quality retail stores for local residents as well as the broader community. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS 115 } This area also includes a variety of housing including "starter" condominiums, apartments, medical facilities and senior residential care facilities. The largest vacant property in this neighborhood is the former Fairchild Semiconductor site, approved for an industrial/office project. T9e Merrydale Overcrossing and Freitas Parkway provide pedestrian, vehicle, and bike connections between the two sections of the neighborhood. The north for< of Gallinas Creek flows through this area from along Freitas Parkway to the wetlands bordering McInnis Park. Neighborhood Economy and Culture NH -131. North San Rafael Town Center. Create an attractive, thriving heart for the North San Rafael community: a centerpiece of commerce and activity with a diversity and synergy of activities for all ages. See LU -2a (Development Review). NH -132. Town Center Activities. Create a Town Center with high quality retail stores for local residents as well as the broader community. Broaden the appeal of the Town Center area by improving pedestrian traffic, increasing the number of local shoppers, and attracting a mix of high quality stores, entertainment, and services. a. Encourage a distinctive commercial niche for the Town Center consistent with the area's characteristics. b. Encourage a variety of stores and services to foster local patronage. Examples include a library; restaurants; a produce market; and music, book, family clothing, housewares, and variety stores. c. Encourage upgrading of anchor stores and specialty stores. d. Support an additional high quality retail anchor store if necessary for economic vitality, consistent with traffic circulation. e. Support nightlife activiti ,-s, such as a late-night restaurant, diner or coffee shops that harmonize with exis ting theaters and cultural activities. See LU -2a (Development Leview). NH -133. Northgate all. Revitalize the economic hea th of the Northgate Mall and surrounding business areas. Encourage efforts to revitalize and expand Northgate Mall, including improving the mix of activities and the qua ity of shops, and upgrading the appearance of the buildings and landscaping, while maintaining a scale consistent with the surrounding community and not exceeding infrastructure capacity. Allow the addition of residences, maximize the potential for affordable housing, and incorporate promenade improvements as described in the North San Rafael Promenade Conceptual Plan in any substantial rehabilitation or expansion of the mall. See LU -2a (Development Leview) and C -24a (North San Rafael Promenade). 116 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS Amended 1/13/2016 NH -134. Outdoor Gathering Places. Encourage outdoor public places that support activities and facilities that will encourage people to gather (such as outdoor cafes with music, entertainment for children as families dine and shop, and periodic cultural and arts events), promote a public plaza, a small music venue, and/or a children's feature, and provide outdoor cafes, sidewalk restaurants, or other uses that provide outdoor seating. See LU -2a (Development Review). NH -135. Incentives. Provide planning incentives for uses that will enhance the Town Center, including retail, office, housing, and community services. Allow a height bonus of two stories for affordable housing. NH -135a. Development Review Process. Through the development review process, encourage improvements consistent with this policy. For example, encourage flexibility in design of retail to incorporate features, such as plazas, pedestrian walkways, entertainment, cultural events, and other community services. Foster partnership among property owners, business owners, community residents, and government agencies to plan and implement future development and changes. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time See LU -13 (Height Bonuses). NH -136. Design Excellence. Assure quality of design by supporting policies that encourage harmonious and aesthetically pleasing design for new and existing development. Upgrade and coordinate landscaping, signage, and building design in the Town Center area, as well as improving building and landscaping maintenance. See LU -2a (Development Review). NH -137. Northgate Business Park. Protect and maintain existing industrial uses and industrial sites that are important to San Rafael's economy and needed for the convenience of its residents and businesses. Allow uses such as delis and copy shops that serve businesses and employees in the area. See LU -2a (Development Review). Las Gallinas _ 1 Avenue could be main street' for A. North San -'" .. Rafael. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS 117 Neighborhood Design NH -138. Industrial Uses and Design Improvement. Upgrade building design and landscaping with new construction and remodeling projects, particularly along Redwood Highway. Evaluate the design of projects considering the views from Highway 101, with particular attention paid to rooftop equipment and screening of mechanical equipment. See also I-4 (Utility Undergrounding) and LU -2a (Development Review). Neighborhood Circulation NH -139. Pedestrian and Bicycle Safety and Accessibility. Improve access and bicycle/pedestrian connections between Northgate One, the Mall at Northgate and Northgate Three. NH -139a. Promenade and Other Improvements. Through the development review process, encourage improvements consistent with this policy. Considerations include: 1. Support routing of the North San Rafael Promenade in the Town Center area to include safer and more convenient pedestrian and bike crossings from the Civic Center to Northgate Three, Northgate Mall, Northgate One, and along Freitas Parkway. 2. Support routing of Marin County north -south bicycle route along Northgate Drive, and increased availability of bicycle racks at the Town Center. 3. Support increased public transit to and from the Town Center. 4. Align crosswalks with bus stops. 5. Encourage shuttle service within the Town Center area during holiday season. 6. Implement traffic calming as needed on roadways in parking lots and redesign traffic flow to minimize conflict between vehicles, bicycles, and pedestrians. 7. Encourage design for additional stores and parking structures to maximize pedestrian access and minimize traffic conflicts. 8. Improve pedestrian safety along Redwood Highway with improved sidewalks and parking lot landscaping. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Donations, Grants, Staff Time See C -24a (North San Rafael Promenade). NH -140. Pedestrian Scale. Create a sense of enclosure, pedestrian -scale and easy accessibility by improving the pedestrian "feel" of the Town Center area. Examples include welcoming, pedestrian - friendly entrances to the shopping areas; pleasant, landscaped walkways between the shopping areas as part of the North San Rafael Promenade; and a focal point at a public plaza. See LU -2a (Development Review). NH -141. Mall Entrance. Consider ways to improve the entrance into the mall. NH -140a. Improved Entrance to the Mall. Support redesign of traffic flow and intersection improvements along Las Gallinas, Northgate Drive, Del Presidio, and Merrydale to expedite traffic to and from the shopping areas and to improve safety for 118 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS Amended 1/13/2016 pedestrians and bicycles. Support realignment of driveways along Las Gallinas to form safer intersections and pedestrian crossing. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Fees NH -142. Redwood Highway Improvements. Upgrade and unify the architecture, signage and landscaping along Redwood Highway on the east side of Highway 101. See LU -2a (Development Review). PEACOCK GAP This neighborhood is developed with single-family homes, condominiums, and the Peacock Gap Golf and Country Club. The private country club has an 18 -hole golf course, driving range, clubhouse, and pro shop. Architectural styles vary depending on the age of the single-family home and condominium developments in the neighborhood. The hills Vision of Peacock Gap Little change is expected in the residential portion of the neighborhood. Should closure of the San Rafael Rock Quarry occur, the property may be annexed to the City as part of the land use entitlement process. A Reclamation Plan is under review by the County, with opportunities for involvement by area residents and the located above the developed area of the neighborhood provide an important visual backdrop, as well as trails and access to the adjacent China Camp State Park. The San Rafael Rock Quarry and McNear Brickworks are located in the southern portion of the neighborhood, along the Point San Pedro Peninsula. Neighborhood Economy and Culture NH -143. San Rafael Rock Quarry and McNear Brickworks. The San Rafael Rock Quarry is currently operational, but its future is unclear at this time. The property owner has expressed an interest in continuing operations, but approval of an updated Reclamation Plan has not yet been obtained from the County. If operations cease during the timeframe of this plan, consider annexation and allow redevelopment of the San Rafael Rock Quarry and McNear Brickworks, taking into account the following factors: a. Consider the County's approved reclamation plan in future land use considerations. The current reclamation plan indicates a mixture of single-family and townhouse units, a marina, commercial recreation or hospitality and neighborhood -serving commercial uses. A revised reclamation plan is anticipated during the timeframe of this General Plan. b. Consider redevelopment of the site only if traffic capacity is available and can meet the City's level of service standards, including all intersections to and from the Downtown and freeway on- and off -ramps. Expand Pt. San Pedro Road past Riviera Drive to four lanes if needed for traffic capacity. c. Create a public use park band along the shoreline, at least 100 feet in width, linking McNears Beach Park with the public walkway along Pt. San Pedro Road. d. Reopen the saltwater marsh to tidal action. Protect the freshwater marsh. e. Protect freshwater ponds. f. Preserve the site's woodland areas and incorporate some of the historic brick works into the project design. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS 119 g. Consider redevelopment of the site at one time to eliminate incompatibilities between the existing operation and redevelopment uses, except for the development of a possible high-speed waterway transit stop. NH -143a. Rock Quarry Plan. Participate in preparation of a new reclamation plan and environmental impact report through the County of Marin, which should form the basis of future land uses and possible annexation. Responsibility: Community Development, Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time NH -144. San Rafael Rock Quarry Impacts. While recognizing the jurisdiction of Marin County over this property, persist in efforts to minimize impacts of the existing quarry operations on surrounding residents, such as noise, air quality, vibrations, street maintenance and truck traffic. NH -144a. Rock Quarry Impacts. Seek to have input into County code enforcement activities, land use entitlements or negotiations with the quarry operator that might reduce impacts on affected properties in the City of San Rafael and on City infrastructure. Responsibility: Community Development, Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time See LU -2a (Development Review). Neighborhood Streets NH -145. Pt. San Pedro Road Widening. Develop Pt. San Pedro Road as a four lane arterial from its intersection with Riviera to the main entrance of the San Rafael Rock Quarry property and as an improved two lane arterial from there to Biscayne Drive, including bicycle lanes consistent with the Bicycle/Pedestrian Master Plan. See LU -2a (Development Review). Neighborhood Design NH -146. San Rafael Rock Quarry Shoreline Use. Develop the San Rafael Rock Quarry shoreline as a public use park band linked to McNears Beach Park and Pt. San Pedro Road upon eventual redevelopment of the Quarry to another use. Develop the park band with a 100 -foot wide width, with adjustment to include significant features, such as beaches, within the park band. Vision of Picnic Valley New residential development will be limited to a few vacant hillside lots within the neighborhood boundary. In -fill redevelopment projects are also possible in the area near Davidson School. NH -146a. Rock Quarry Park. Through the development review process, establish a bay frontage park linked to McNear's Beach and the existing walkway on Point San Pedro Road. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time PICNIC VALLEY The Picnic Valley Neighborhood, one of the older neighborhoods in San Rafael, is located east of Gerstle Park. The neighborhood is 20 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS Amended 1/13/2016 developed with a mix of residential uses, featuring apartments and condominiums in the area near Davidson School, and single-family homes and some duplex units in the hillside areas. Access to the hillside homes is provided by very narrow streets, alleyways or pedestrian -only "walks." This is a unique feature within this neighborhood. The hillside area of the neighborhood, Southern Heights, was formerly farmland. This area experiences "through" traffic as motorists use Wolfe Grade to access the adjacent industrial area and downtown. NH -147. Residential Use by Davidson Middle School. Encourage improvements in the area around Davidson Middle School through redevelopment that includes live/work uses. NH -147a. Lindaro Live/Work. Revise the Zoning Regulations to include a zoning district that allows live/work uses in the Light Industrial/Office and Industrial area surrounding Davidson Middle School. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time RAFAEL MEADOWS/LOS RANCHITOS Rafael Meadows is a residential area located behind and along the V i s i o n o f Rafael Meadows/ Los Ranchitos Rafael Meadow is located in the City of San Rafael; Los Ranchitos is a neighborhood in an unincorporated area of the County. Some of the properties along Merrydale Road may redevelop in the future with more housing. The newest development is Redwood Village consisting of 133 townhomes and single-family residences. west side of Merrydale Road. This area is developed primarily with small older, one - and two-story single-family homes. Apartments and condominiums are located along Merrydale Road. Two churches are also located in the neighborhood. The unincorporated Los Ranchitos area features single-family homes on larger lots. Most lots are over an acre in size and some residents house horses on their property. NH -148. Residential Use at the End of Merrydale Road. Evaluate amending the General Plan and Zoning Ordinance to promote residential uses at the end of Merrydale Road. NH -148a. Zoning Change. Consider amending the General Plan and Zoning Ordinance to allow housing at the end of Merrydale Road. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time SANTA VENETIA The unincorporated Santa Venetia neighborhood is primarily developed with single family homes, condominiums and apartments, which are located near the China Camp neighborhood boundary. A neighborhood shopping center, Gallinas School, the Jewish Community Center and three small parks are also located within the boundary of this neighborhood. It includes Santa Margarita Island, Santa Venetia Marsh and San Pedro Ridge Open Space Preserves. V i s i o n o f Santa Venetia This unincorporated area of the County is anticipated to remain essentially a residential area with a neighborhood school and other community institutions. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS 121 SMITH RANCH V is i on of S m it h Ran c h Properties in this neighborhood are essentially built -out, including the San Rafael Airport, which is limited to additional plane hangar space construction and landscape improvements in the future. Plans for a skate park at John F. McInnis Park have been approved by the County of Marin. The habitat value of the wetlands adjacent to McInnis Park, Marin Ranch Airport, and the riparian corridors along branches of Gallinas Creek will be enhanced and protected, with public viewing areas located where feasible and appropriate. This neighborhood, located south of the St. Vincent's/Silveira properties, consists of John F. McInnis County Park, the San Rafael Airport, Contempo Marin Mobile Home Park, the Century Theatres, Regency Center office buildings, and a mixed-use area located north of Smith Ranch Road, including the Smith Ranch Homes senior residential project, a nursing home, apartment complexes, a deli, dry cleaner, and restaurant. The San Rafael Airport is privately owned and is limited to based - aircraft only. Commercial flight activity, flight training and use by helicopters are prohibited. McInnis Park, 450 acres in size, is developed with softball fields, soccer fields, tennis courts, a canoe launch, a golf driving range, restaurant, 9 -hole golf course, miniature golf, batting cages, and nature trails. Architectural styles in the neighborhood vary due to the mix of old and new developments. Neighborhood Economy and Culture NH -149. San Rafael Airport. I Designate the site as Airport/Recreation consistent with the land use covenant agreed to by the City, the County, and the property owner. Recognize the unique and valuable recreational and environmental characteristics of the airport site. The following uses are allowed on the property: • Uses consistent with the 2002 Master Use Permit, including the airport and ancillary airpert services and light industrial uses. Private and public recreational uses. Public utility uses as approved by the appropriate government agencies, including flood control, sanitary sewer, gas, and electric, and public safety facilities. Open space in -luding wetlands. NH -149a. San Rafael Airport. Through the development review process, require, as needed, improv.-ments consistent with this policy. Responsibi ity: Community Development Timeframe Long Term Resources: Fees Neighborho d Design NH -150. Smi h Ranch Pond. Enhance the habitat values of Smith Ranch Pond. Include a public observation station if possible. NH -150a. Smith Ranch Pond Maintenance. Initiate pond dredging and removal of exotic plants, as provided for in the Smith Ranch Pond Maintenance Plan. Through the development review process, require, as needed, improvements consistent with this policy. Since 2010, the, e has been a collaborative effort to studv and implement pond restoration by local enviror-mental organizations in coordination with the Citv. Efforts include reviewine resto--yation options that may rea_uire amending the Pond Restoration and Maintenance Plan adopted in the 1990's. 122 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS Amended 1/13/2016 Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: SbertLon Term Resources: Adjacent Property Owners SUN VALLEY The primary land use in the neighborhood is single-family residential. The neighborhood also has some duplexes and small apartments. Commercial land uses are limited to the neighborhood V i s i o n o f S u n V a I I e y shopping center at the corner of Fifth and California, the West End Nursery, and the monument sales office near the Mt. Tamalpais The scale, diversity, and residential Cemetery at the end of Fifth Avenue. Sun Valley Park and Sun character of the neighborhood Valley School provide recreational opportunities to residents of the need to be maintained, including neighborhood. the existing affordable housing stock. Housing shall continue to be The diverse character of neighborhood housing is significant the dominant land use in the because homes were developed with the changing architectural neighborhood. New commercial styles over the past century. The oldest area of the neighborhood uses will only be allowed if they was subdivided between 1882 and 1916, the Sun Valley benefit the neighborhood and will subdivision was built after World War II, and the hillside homes not impair the dominant residential were constructed in the 1960s and 1970s. Major topographic character. There is a desire for features such as the Sun Valley slope and the upper slopes of the infrastructure improvements, Red Rock Quarry are significant parts of the neighborhood. including better storm drainage and sidewalks. The 1980 Neighborhood Plan was adopted, in part, to establish development standards for eight undeveloped parcels, totaling 170 acres. The Camgros and Ducca properties are the only vacant parcels remaining in Sun Valley today for development. Neighborhood Homes NH -151. New Development. New development and significant remodels should retain the existing neighborhood character, particularly in areas of smaller or historic homes. See LU -2a (Development Review). NH -152. Camgros/Ducca Properties. Develop these properties at densities and a scale consistent with that of the surrounding neighborhood. Seek annexation of these properties when they are developed. Development should comply with the City's Hillside Guidelines and should include enhancements along the riparian corridor. See LU -2a (Development Review) and LU -6a (LAFCO). Neighborhood Circulation NH -153. Circulation. Upgrade walkways to sidewalks as a means of safe access to Sun Valley School and the neighborhood commercial center. See LU -2a (Development Review). Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS 123 Neighborhood Design NH -154. Annexation of Mt. Tamalpais Cemetery. Consider annexation of the Mt. Tamalpais Cemetery, which constitutes an important element in the visual backdrop of the neighborhood. See LU -2a (Development Review) and LU -6a (LAFCO). Neighborhood Economy and Culture NH -155. Commercial Uses. Prohibit commercial uses in Sun Valley unless such uses would be of primary benefit to the neighborhood and would not disturb or impair its dominant residential character. Encourage retention of the existing neighborhood commercial services at Fifth and California Avenues and at West End Nursery, allowing acceptable alternative uses only if it can be clearly demonstrated that local serving uses are not economically viable. NH -155a. Sun Valley Commercial Uses. Through the development review process, encourage improvements consistent with this policy. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Fees Terra Linda and Vision North San Rafael In November 1997, the City Council received Vision North San Rafael. The Vision is the result of a community -wide effort to describe the future of the northern half of San Rafael. In addition to goals and actions, the document includes a list of implementation strategies to make the vision a reality. Terra Linda is a neighborhood in north San Rafael, and covers much of the area of the Vision. The Vision identifies needed improvements to the Terra Linda Shopping Center and encourages the construction of the North San Rafael Promenade, both located within the neighborhood boundary. The Vision establishes top priorities and goals for residential neighborhoods in the Design, Beautification and Maintenance, Homes for a Variety of People, Community Services, and Gathering Places sections of the document. Implementation of the Vision will continue to be a requirement for all new development projects in the North San Rafael neighborhoods. TERRA LINDA Terra Linda, one of the larger neighborhoods in San Rafael, is developed primarily with single-family homes. Condominiums and apartments are located at the end of Freitas Parkway and along Nova Albion and Los Gamos Road. Architectural styles vary throughout the neighborhood, primarily developed with Eichler, Kenny, or "ranch" style homes. There are three senior housing facilities: Villa Marin, Maria B. Freitas and the Nazareth House. The Terra Linda Recreation Center, Santa Margarita and Freitas Parks, and sports fields and playgrounds at private and public schools offer recreational opportunities for residents. Kaiser Hospital and Terra Linda Shopping Center are also located within the neighborhood. Traffic in the area is generated by the hospital, the schools, and by Highway 101 diversions. The Terra Linda/Sleepy Hollow Open Space Preserve, located in a semi -circle around the Santa Margarita Valley, provides a community separator between San Rafael, San Anselmo and Lucas Valley. "Pocket" parks are located along Freitas Parkway. 124 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS Amended 1/13/2016 Neighborhood Homes NH -156 Eichler Homes. Preserve the design character of Eichler homes. NH -156a. Eichler Homes. Consider preparation of design guidelines and/or zoning regulations to preserve Eichler Homes. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: ShertLong Term Resources: Staff Time NH -157. Hillside Parcels, East of Los Gamos Drive. These steep, highly visible parcels above the YMCA and office building have limited access. Development shall be clustered to retain community -wide visible hillside resources. Access to the northern parcel is very difficult and should be considered through the adjacent southern parcel. See LU -2a (Development Review). NH -158. Santa Margarita Neighborhood Plan. Prepare a neighborhood plan for Santa Margarita to address neighborhood concerns. See NH -la (Neighborhood Planning Process). Neighborhood Circulation NH -159. North San Rafael Promenade. Support implementation of the North San Rafael Promenade. See C -24a (North San Rafael Promenade). NH -160. Freitas Parkway Overhead Utilities. Support and seek funding to underground utilities along Freitas Parkway. See I -4a (Funding Undergrounding Utilities) and I -4b (Neighborhood Efforts). Neighborhood Economy and Culture NH -161. Terra Linda Shopping Center. Encourage improvements to Terra Linda Shopping Center. Incorporate improvements for the North San Rafael Promenade into upgrades at the shopping center. Examples include: • Coordinated design and colors at the Terra Linda Shopping Center. • Tenant identification signs for Terra Linda Shopping Center consistent with the center's appearance. • Pedestrian friendly plaza in front of Scotty's Market and entry signage at Freitas and Del Ganado. • Housing when possible, thereby adding to the vitality of this area and facilitating the use of public transit. See LU -2a (Development Review) and C -24a (North San Rafael Promenade). Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS 125 Neighborhood Economy and Culture NH -162. Kaiser Permanente Medical Center. Retain uses at the Kaiser Permanente Medical Center and seek ways to improve traffic and parking. See LU -2a (Development Review). Neighborhood Design NH -163. Youth Recreation Facilities in North San Rafael. Encourage safe places for the young people in the North San Rafael Community to gather and to explore and pursue their interests. The Terra Linda pool is one of the most popular recreation facilities in San Rafael. V i s i o n o f West End NH -163a. Youth Facilities. Through the development review process, require, as needed, improvements consistent with this policy. Provide and maintain additional recreation facilities in North San Rafael, including a teen center and skate park. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Fees NH -164. Santa Margarita Creek. Improve the appearance of the Santa Margarita Creek on Del Ganado Road while maintaining storm drain capabilities. See CON -8a (Creek Restoration) and CON -8b (Tree Rentention) NH -165. San Rafael Library Services. Encourage library services west of Highway 101. Development of mixed-use projects on underutilized properties along the "Miracle Mile" is a possibility during the planning period of San Rafael 2020. See CA -12a (Opportunities for Community Based Libraries) WEST END The West End neighborhood, located west of Downtown, is a mixed-use area consisting of single-family homes, apartments, and commercial uses. The "Miracle Mile," a commercial corridor extending from the Downtown area, bisects the community and provides vehicular access to San Anselmo and beyond to West Marin. 126 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS Amended 1/13/2016 Neighborhood Economy and Culture NH -166. Miracle Mile. Existing commercial uses along the Miracle Mile (Fourth Street west of the "Y" at Second and Fourth Streets) shall be retained and improved in terms of visual appearance, parking, landscaping and vehicular access from side streets where possible. New development or redevelopment should be of a scale and intensity consistent with existing development. See LU -2a (Development Review). NH -167. Miracle Mile Noise Abatement. Consider the benefits and practicality of noise abatement techniques when designing or implementing capital improvements along the Miracle Mile. NH -167a. Miracle Mile Noise Abatement. Through the capital improvement program, consider the implementation of noise abatement techniques, including the use of attractive fencing, trees and landscaping, and noise mitigation pavement. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NEIGHBORHOODS 127 Community Design Our Use of Land Introduction This element addresses the physical form of the natural environment and the built form of the City. The major features that give San Rafael its visual character are the hills and valleys, the Bay, creeks, the San Rafael Canal, the highways and other transportation corridors, neighborhoods, and the Downtown. The city's historic structures also add to the uniqueness and identity of San Rafael. These include the Mission San Rafael Arcangel and St. Raphael's Church, historic homes, buildings in the Downtown constructed from the late 1800's through the 1920's, the Rafael Film Center and the Marin Civic Center. Community Design policies address how these natural and built elements visually create the identity of San Rafael, and how they contribute to the city's quality of life. The City Image section of this element addresses the qualities that form the City's larger visual character. It provides direction regarding the preservation of views of hillsides and ridgelines, the Bay and Canal, and surrounding areas. It explains how the major transportation corridors can contribute to the quality of life in the City, and how the character of neighborhoods can be recognized, maintained and strengthened. The Design Quality section of this element addresses in greater detail the streets, the Downtown, and other neighborhoods, and provides design direction to guide future development in those areas. The Neighborhoods Element describes policies specific to the Downtown and individual neighborhoods. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / COMMUNITY DESIGN 129 Community Transportation Corridors .Al,/0 Creeks and Streams SMART Right of Way Scenic Rural Roadway Historic and Architecturally Significant Buildings and Areas .�� . Public Access to Shoreline or Waterfront 3 +� San Rafael Redevelopment » Area Boundary Visually Significant Hillsides, Ridges, and Landforms Exhibit 18 f� oil'♦ Rafael K tj Community Design 1164— !�! Z i!C �{{ �!j ►1111 .1 � � � �, �`1 �`��w\�1 • �I�l� �i1� qtr` r�1 � � � -- �� -. I SMART:r Transportation Corridors Creeks and Streams Right. Histori Architecturally Significant Buildings and Areas III*Public Access to Shoreline Gatewaysor Waterfront San Rafael Redevelopment Area Boundary Visually Significant Hillsides, Ridges, and Landforms 0 boo 1003 I�Uo PON M ►� ��,. y 1 �� GOAL 7: A BEAUTIFUL CITY It is the goal of the City of San Rafael to have its best natural and built features preserved and strengthened to enhance the attractiveness and livability of the City. Community design policies guide the City's built environment to create an appealing, functional and safe City where people will want to live, work and play. Our well-designed city will be attractive and interesting, and will meet the living, economic and social needs of the community. Within the Community Design Element the valuable qualities of the natural and built environment are identified, and the policies suggest methods to preserve and enhance those qualities. City Image San Rafael's strong visual quality is based on its setting between two dominant physical features: San Francisco Bay and the hills of Marin County. The City's early transportation corridors were developed based on ease of movement through the hills, along the base of the hills, and alongside waterways. The Downtown and neighborhoods formed along the sections of land that were easier to build upon and close to transportation. The result is a city with a strong relationship to natural features and distinct neighborhoods. CD -1. City Image. Reinforce the City's positive and distinctive image by recognizing the natural features of the City, protecting historic resources, and by strengthening the positive qualities of the City's focal points, gateways, corridors and neighborhoods. CD -la. Gateway Enhancements. Fund gateway enhancements. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time, Growth Allocation Program CD -lb. Finer Grain Design Qualities. (Deleted) Pevelep aeighber4eed or- eat+ider- plans te identify mer -e detailed design qualities and elements Tim. o Term e Rmources: Staff Time The cupola of S t . CD -le. Way -Finding Signage. Prepare and implement an R a p h a e I ' s Church attractive citywide way -finding sign program to direct people to the City's cultural is a local landmark. resources, public facilities, parks and other important destinations. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time CD -1d. Landscape Improvement. Recognize that landscaping is a critical design component. Encourage maximum use of available landscape area to create visual interest and foster sense of the natural environment in new and existing developments. Encourage the use of a variety of site appropriate plant materials. See CA -13b (Preservation Ordinance) and LU -2a (Development Review). 132 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / COMMUNITY DESIGN Amended 1/13/2016 Neighborhoods Neighborhoods are the building blocks of San Rafael's character, with the most important neighborhood being the Downtown. In addition to being the urban heart of Marin County, Downtown is a livable and walkable place where people gather to enjoy life or conduct business. San Rafael's residential neighborhoods are unique areas defined by their street trees, architecture, or in some areas, a mix of residential and commercial uses. Many of San Rafael's neighborhoods have a mix of uses, such as Dominican University in the Dominican neighborhood, or the industrial and retail areas in north San Rafael. Neighborhood polices encourage enhancing the qualities that define and make each neighborhood unique, and strengthening the overall visual and functional quality of each neighborhood. Policies that control the defining elements of neighborhoods should also allow for innovative architecture that is in context with the surrounding neighborhoods. (See also the Neighborhoods Element for design policies pertaining to specific neighborhoods.) CD -2. Neighborhood Identity. Recognize and promote the unique character and integrity of the city's residential neighborhoods and Downtown. Strengthen the "hometown" image of San Rafael by: • Maintaining the urban, historic, and pedestrian character of the Downtown; • Preserving and enhancing the scale and landscaped character of the City's residential neighborhoods; • Improving the appearance and function of commercial areas; and • Allowing limited commercial uses in residential neighborhoods that serve local residents and create neighborhood -gathering places. See LU -2a (Development Review). CD -3. Neighborhoods. Recognize, preserve and enhance the positive qualities that give neighborhoods their unique identities, while also allowing flexibility for innovative design. Develop programs to encourage and respect the context and scale of existing neighborhoods. CD -3a. Design Review Process. Consider ways to perform limited design review for major ground floor additions and renovations to assure compatibility with surroundings. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time CD -3b. Development Standards. Reexamine residential development standards to address building size, setbacks, height, location of parking, landscaping and design impact. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Long Terme ,��,ortz erTo m Resources: Staff Time CD -3c. Revisions to Design Guidelines. Consider revisions to residential design guidelines to further identify design elements and unique neighborhood qualities. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time See LU -2a (Development Review), CD- IOb (Compatibility of Patterns), CD -Ila (Compatibility of Building Patterns) and H-2b3h (Compatibility of Building Patterns). Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / COMMUNITY DESIGN 133 Historic Resources San Rafael is home to many valuable historic treasures. These features aid in defining San Rafael's character and make the City unique. Policies in the Community Design and the Culture and the Arts elements encourage preservation of these identifiable features so that San Rafael can maintain its heritage and identity. CD -4. Historic Resources. Protect San Rafael's positive and distinctive image by recognizing, preserving and enhancing the City's historic resources. CD -4a. Historic Resources Information. Help residents understand and enjoy their City's heritage by providing information about historic resources. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Lone TermC'� Resources: Staff Time CD -4b. Adaptive Reuse. Consider revisions to design guidelines and to zoning regulations to provide development incentives for appropriate adaptive re -use. Since the 2004 adoption of the San Rafael General Plan 2020, some of the commercial and lieht industrial/office zonine districts have been amended to expand the types of allowable uses, some with reduced permit review. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Lone Termc'n Resources: Staff Time CD -4c. Sign Ordinance. Revise sign ordinance to allow appropriate signage and plaques identifying historic structures. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Lone Terms' Resources: Staff Time CD -4d. Design Guidelines. As part of the Community Design programs to prepare design guidelines, include guidance to assist property owners of historic properties in defining appropriate changes and alterations and to illustrate outstanding examples of how new developments can fit into an historic neighborhood. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Lone Terms' Resources: Staff Time, Grants The Boyd Gatehouse was built in 1879 and now hosts the Marin History Museum. See also CD -3a (Design Review Process), CD -lc (Way -Finding Signage), CA -13a (Inventory Update), CA -13d (Public Education), CA -14b (Zoning), and CA -14c (Incentives). 134 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / COMMUNITY DESIGN Amended 1/13/2016 Focal Points Focal points provide orientation by serving as landmarks and designating important places. The Downtown is a focal point because of its taller buildings, the church, and its density, history and lively walkable environment. The hills are focal points because of their size and natural beauty, as are the San Rafael and San Pablo Bays. The Marin County Civic Center is a focal point because of its architecture and important public use. Views to focal points and entrances into focal points should be recognized and enhanced where desirable. The land uses in the Downtown and Marin Civic Center should continue to be concentrated within their defined areas to further strengthen the character of these areas. Downtown should continue to be characterized by pedestrian oriented uses and its historic buildings, in order to retain its notable character. CD -5. Views. Respect and enhance to the greatest extent possible, views of the Bay and its islands, Bay wetlands, St. Raphael's church bell tower, Canalfront, marinas, Mt. Tamalpais, Marin Civic Center and hills and ridgelines from public streets, parks and publicly accessible pathways. CD -5a. Views. Improve access to and enhance views of the Canalfront. Develop a Ganalf:Font design plan to addr- w N'Nicaoeess, view eofFider-s a -ad appropriate developmeH4 standards for adjaeen4 .Implement the Canalfront Conce_otual Desicn Plan. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Grants, Staff Time See LU -2a (Development Review) and NH -74a (Design Plan and Vision for the Canalfront). CD -6. Hillsides and Bay. Protect the visual identity of the hillsides and Bay by controlling development within hillside areas, providing setbacks from the Bay, and providing public access along the Bay edge. CD -6a. Hillside Design Guidelines. Continue to implement hillside design guidelines through the design review process. Update the guidelines as needed. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees CD -6b. Wetland Setbacks. Continue to implement the wetland setbacks addressed in Policy CON -4 and in the zoning ordinance. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees CD -6c. Public Access Opportunities. Continue to evaluate public access opportunities through the development review process. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / COMMUNITY DESIGN 135 See also C -27c (Bay Trail). CD -7. Downtown and Marin Civic Center. Build upon the character of these areas by controlling land uses to clearly distinguish their boundaries; by recognizing Mission San Rafael Arcangel and St. Raphael Church, Marin Civic Center, and other buildings that help define the City's character, and requiring that these and other architectural characteristics and land uses that give these areas their identity are strengthened. See LU -2a (Development Review). Gateways Gateways are the entry points to the city or a specific area. A gateway could be a subtle change in the landscaping or a natural feature such as a hill which provides a vantage point. A gateway could also be a noticeable change in land use or a boundary marker. San Rafael's gateways are identified on maps. CD-8.Gateways. Provide and maintain distinctive gateways to identify City entryways. CD -8a. Gateways. Evaluate each of the gateways defined on the design element maps to determine what natural, architectural, signage or landscape treatments should further establish these locations as identifiable gateways within the City, and implement the desired improvements as part of the City's Capital Improvement program. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Redevelopment, Economic Development, Grants, Staff Time, Capital Improvement Program See also NH -37a (Freeway Ramps). Transportation Corridors San Rafael's transportation corridors are where most people develop their impression of the City. A well-designed corridor should be inviting, attractive and appear visually organized. A corridor's character should be of native landscaping, a prosperous commercial street, or a groomed neighborhood passageway. Some of San Rafael's major corridors are the freeways, Second and Third Streets in the Downtown, Lincoln Avenue and Redwood Highway, Pt. San Pedro Road, Miracle Mile and the roadways that connect San Rafael to neighboring communities. Corridors could be visually improved through streetscape programs that include trees, streetlights, and other furnishings. The visual quality of corridors can also be enhanced by requiring consistent building setbacks, controlling the mass and height of buildings, architectural guidelines, landscaping and signage. Each corridor should be evaluated to determine the unique set of controls and features that may enhance its visual appearance. CD -9. Transportation Corridors. To improve the function and appearance of corridors, recognize those shown on Exhibits 17 and 18 and define each corridor's contribution to the City based upon its land use and transportation function and how it is experienced by the public. 136 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / COMMUNITY DESIGN Amended 1/13/2016 CD -9a. Corridor Design Guidelines. Develop specific design guidelines for each corridor that address building massing, articulation of building facades, detailing, lighting, landscaping, street trees and other desired infrastructure and characteristics. Include appropriate zoning code provisions. Responsibility: Community Development, Public Works Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time CD -9b. Right -of -Way Landscaping. Encourage Caltrans to install and maintain landscaping along its right-of-ways. Responsibility: Public Works, Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: State and Federal Funds See also CON -16a. (Distribution of Information) and C -22a (Native Plants Along Roadway). Design Quality As modifications are made to San Rafael, whether through public improvements to streets, parks or other public infrastructure, or as private development affects neighborhoods or the Downtown, the design quality of these changes can determine whether they improve or detract from the quality of life in San Rafael. This section of the Community Design Element recognizes the important qualities of streets, the Downtown, and other neighborhoods, and provides design direction for future development. In many instances implementation of the policies will require the preparation of detailed guidelines or other programs. Design Guidelines should provide a framework of design principles without mandating any one style or genre. See the Neighborhoods Element for design policies related to specific neighborhoods. CD -10. Nonresidential Design Guidelines. Recognize, preserve and enhance the design elements that contribute to the economic vitality of commercial areas. Develop design guidelines to ensure that new nonresidential and mixed-use development fits within and improves the immediate neighborhood and the community as a whole. r CD -10a. Visual Compatibility. Ensure that new structures are visually compatible with the neighborhood and encourage neighborhood gathering places. Guidelines may address screening of service functions, materials and detailing, screening of roof equipment, lighting, landscaping, outdoor cafe seating and pedestrian amenities. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time CD -10b. Compatibility of Patterns. Adopt design guidelines to ensure compatibility of nonresidential building patterns. Guidelines may address setback patterns, parking and driveway patterns, building scale, height and building stepbacks, transition between commercial and residential districts, signage and landscaping. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Lone-TermS"�rm Resources: Staff Time CD -10c. Successful Design Portfolio. Establish a portfolio of desirable projects illustrating successful design. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Lone Terms' m Resources: Staff Time For Downtown Design, see NH -29 (Downtown Design) for policies and programs related tc recognizing, preserving and enhancing Downtown's design elements. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / COMMUNITY DESIGN 137 CD -11. Multifamily Design Guidelines. Recognize, preserve and enhance the design elements that ensure multifamily housing is visually and functionally compatible with other buildings in the neighborhood. Develop design guidelines to ensure that new development fits within and improves the character defining elements of neighborhoods. CD-lla. Compatibility of Building Patterns. Adopt design guidelines to ensure compatibility of neighborhood building patterns. Guidelines should address setback patterns, parking and driveway patterns, building scale, transitions between land use districts, height and building stepbacks, as well as entries, roof design, roof equipment, windows, architectural style, materials and detailing, lighting and landscaping. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Lone TermShoA Resources: Staff Time See CD -10c. (Successful Design Portfolio). CD -12. Industrial Areas. Recognize the economic importance of industrial areas to the community. Require building and landscape improvements to create a visually comfortable and welcome appearance of the streetscape along roadways in industrial areas adjacent to residential neighborhoods. CD -12a. Landscaping. Adopt design guidelines to address and modify zoning code landscape requirements to ensure compatibility with adjacent residential neighborhoods. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Long Termc'n Resources: Staff Time CD -12b. Sidewalk and Street Trees. Install or improve sidewalks and street trees in existing industrial areas as redevelopment occurs, through the development review process. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Private CD -12c. Unlawful Storage. Use code enforcement to eliminate unlawful storage and to assure property maintenance. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time, Fines See EV -8a (Industrial Zoning). CD -13. Single -Family Residential Design Guidelines. Recognize, preserve and enhance the design elements that contribute to the livability of neighborhoods and their visual appearance. Recognize that each neighborhood is unique, and that design review must consider the distinct characteristics of individual neighborhoods. Develop design guidelines to ensure that new development fits within and improves the character -defining elements of neighborhoods. See CD -10c (Successful Design Portfolio), H-2a3a (Design Concerns of Single -Family Homes) and H-2b3h (Compatibility of Building Patterns). 138 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / COMMUNITY DESIGN Amended 1/13/2016 CD -14. Recreational Areas. In multifamily development, require private outdoor areas and on-site common spaces for low and medium densities. In high density and mixed-use development, private and/or common outdoor spaces are encouraged. Common spaces may include recreation facilities, gathering spaces, and site amenities such as picnicking and play areas. CD -14a. On -Site Recreational Areas. Continue requirements for on-site recreational areas as specified in the zoning ordinance. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees CD -15. Participation in Project Review. Provide for public involvement in the review of new development, renovations, and public projects with the following: • Design guidelines and other information relevant to the project as described in the Community Design Element that would be used by residents, designers, project developers, City staff, and City decision makers; • Distribution of the procedures of the development process that include the following: submittal information, timelines for public review, and public notice requirements; • Standardized thresholds that state when design review of projects is required (e.g. residential conversions, second -story additions); and • Effective public participation in the review process. CD -15a. Notification and Information about Development Projects. Continue to enhance San Rafael's public notification and neighborhood meeting process to encourage early participation in the review of projects. Create succinct and understandable written handouts to guide property owners, designers, residents and business owners through the City submittal, review and approval processes. Continue notifying neighborhood and homeowner associations about proposed projects in nearby nonresidential areas. Evaluate the adequacy of notification procedures and enhance as needed. For example, consider requiring notification of non -owner occupants and requiring large on-site visible notice of projects under review. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing; Short Term (evaluation of notification process) Resources: Staff Time, Fees CD-15bd. Thresholds for Design Review. Since 2004, some thresholds have been adjusted for Droiects. Reevaluate thresholds for design review to ensure sufficient public involvement in the evaluation of design review permits. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time See EV -17a (Pre -Submittal Process), G -7a (Review of Facilities Proposed by Other Agencies), I -5a (Design Review), and H-3a4a (Neighborhood Meetings). CD -16. Property Maintenance. Provide incentives and enforcement to achieve desirable property maintenance. CD -16a. Code Enforcement. Continue code enforcement efforts for trash and litter removal and other maintenance issues in all types of property. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time, Fines Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / COMMUNITY DESIGN 139 CD -16b. Educational Materials. Continue to provide programs and educational materials to inform property owners about property maintenance requirements in accordance with zoning regulations and design guidelines. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time CD -16c. Loan Program. Encourage lower income property owners to use the Housing Authority's loan program. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time See NH -4a (Code Enforcement), NH -4b (Design Review Conditions of Approval) and NH -4c (Property Maintenance Standards Ordinance). CD -17. Street Furnishings. Encourage appropriate benches, trash containers, street lighting, public art, and other street furnishings. Select styles compatible with individual neighborhoods and the Downtown to strengthen their identities. CD-17a.Street Furnishings. Provide street furnishings that are consistent with applicable design style. Work with neighbors and businesses to fund program. Responsibility: Public Works, Community Services Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Capital Improvements See LU -2a (Development Review). CD -18. Landscaping. Recognize the unique contribution provided by landscaping, and make it a significant component of all site design. CD -18a. Zoning Regulations for Landscaping. Evaluate and amend as necessary, the Zoning Ordinance's landscaping provisions to promote development with a strongly landscaped character. The intent is that individual neighborhood character be developed and maintained, architecture be softened by plant materials where appropriate, conflicting uses be buffered, parking areas be screened, comfortable outdoor living and walking spaces be created, air pollution be mitigated and developments be made water efficient through the use of a variety of site -appropriate plant material. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time C13-19. Lighting. Allow adequate site lighting for safety purposes while controlling excessive light spillover and glare. CD -19a. Site Lighting. Through the design review process, evaluate site lighting for safety and glare on proposed projects. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Planning application fees, Staff Time 140 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / COMMUNITY DESIGN Amended 1/13/2016 CD -19b. Lighting Plan. Require new development and projects making significant parking lot improvements or proposing new lighting to prepare a lighting plan consistent with the Design Guidelines for review by City planning staff. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time See also I -6d (Street Lighting Program). CD -20. Commercial Signage. Provide sign regulations and guidelines that allow adequate visual identification necessary for successful commercial uses, while also taking into consideration the visual impact along any given roadway. CD -20a. Sign Ordinance. Update the Sign Ordinance and, when developing regulations, take into account the cumulative effects of possible signage along a roadway or corridor. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time CD -21. Parking Lot Landscaping. Provide parking lot landscaping to control heat build-up from pavement, reduce air pollution, provide shade cover for vehicles and soften the appearance of the parking lot. Emphasize the use of trees, and limit the height of shrub plantings so as to avoid creating security problems. CD -21 a. Parking Lot Landscaping Requirements. Update parking lot landscape requirements to increase the screening of parking lots from the street and nearby properties. Requirements would address appropriate size and location of landscaping, necessary screening consistent with security considerations, tree protection measures, and appropriate percent of shade coverage required of parking lot trees. Include maintenance requirements in all approvals. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time CD -21b. Parking Lot Landscape Enforcement. Require that newly installed parking lot landscaping be maintained and replaced as needed. Assure that landscaping is thriving prior to expiration of the required 2 -year maintenance bond. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / COMMUNITY DESIGN 141 Economic Vitality Our Foundation Introduction San Rafael's outstanding quality of life and economy are linked - each supports and benefits the other. Business is drawn to San Rafael by such amenities as the natural setting, quality schools, and public services. In turn, the economy contributes to those qualities - it generates local goods and services for residents, jobs for community members and revenues for City services such as parks, libraries, schools, police and fire protection. Municipal revenue from the business community, through sales and hotel taxes and business license fees, exceeds the cost of City services, thereby contributing to City programs and infrastructure that are enjoyed by all residents. San Rafael is the business center of Marin County. Over 10,000 businesses exist in Marin County, half of which are in San Rafael. The commercial base is broad and diverse, with many small and medium sized businesses. ADDroximately-Lara tNan 50 of the almost 6,000400 businesses in San Rafael have 100 or more employees. Over tho pcot decade, high teohnology businesses have innreecerl in imnortanoe en`I number resulting in one of the highe6t of garne software prodUGtion the-verl� Tho nurnher of home b.+ced- h- sinecc.--so las i,lso inoreeeed- by over 17 perGent in tho pont fives . Overall, San Rafael's robust and stable economy is due to three factors. First, San Rafael is viewed as a desirable place to do business with good transportation access, high income residents and a good reputation. Second, the City's economic base is diverse and buffers impacts from economic downturns. Third, San Rafael responds to change and accommodates new opportunities. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / ECONOMIC VITALITY 143 Economic Vision The City of San Rafael envisions a future that continues to exhibit a healthy, vibrant economy, driven by the community's commitment to the vitality of our individual business enterprises and key industries, to the recognition of the importance of our cultural diversity and its significant contribution to our prosperity, and to the preservation of our unique environment. Attaining the economic vision will be the result of productive partnerships among businesses, schools, neighborhood groups, government and environmental interests that have balanced competing concerns. San Rafael's businesses continue to be diverse: ranging from small to large; from local -serving to global; from traditional to high technology and from specialty to consumer goods. The city is a supportive environment for entrepreneurs starting and growing their businesses, and for mature businesses adapting to a dynamic marketplace. Our businesses are successful in attracting and retaining skilled workers, who are eager to live and work in Marin's transportation and cultural center. The business community is active in local affairs and embraces environmentally friendly business practices. In addition to being home to several prominent companies, San Rafael is known as a key North Bay center for automotive, building trades and home improvements, and technology -oriented industries. San Rafael's downtown continues to be `alive after five' with entertainment and cultural attractions, excellent restaurants offering a wide range of cuisines, and intriguing galleries and boutiques. The Canal waterway draws people to an appealing promenade that successfully links vibrant retail and maritime uses. Stores in a revitalized Northgate Town Center benefit from an efficient transportation network, drawing customers from beyond surrounding neighborhoods and nearby offices. Commercial properties are renewed in response to changing market conditions and opportunities. Throughout the City can be found appropriately scaled and sensitively designed mixed use projects that support the economy by providing, for example, both commercial square footage, and affordable and market rate housing, without compromising the integrity of our neighborhoods or worsening traffic congestion. City government is positioned to provide efficient, cost-effective services and has been particularly adept in securing funding from many sources. While respectful of the free market's effectiveness, the City is willing to assert its authority to stimulate changes that are consistent with the City's goals. The strength of San Rafael's economy benefits the businesses and workforce as well as its residents. Workers have opportunities to secure affordable housing and competitively priced goods and services. This in turn has enabled household income to enhance the quality of life of San Rafael's families, linkinq economic vitality to individual and collective prosperity. 144 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / ECONOMIC VITALITY Amended 1/13/2016 GOAL 8: A SOUND ECONOMY It is the goal for San Rafael to have a vital, forward-looking citywide economy developed with appropriate respect for our environment. San Rafael has an economy that readily adapts to and takes advantage of changes in the way business is conducted. City government helps shape the existing economy and provide for its growth in a way that ensures sufficient municipal revenue without adversely impacting our quality of life. Policy and land use decisions promote San Rafael's economy with an emphasis on balance and infrastructure limits, while maintaining a commitment to the environment. EV -1. Economic Health and Quality of Life. Understand and appreciate the contributions essential to our quality of life made by a healthy economy, especially to public safety, our schools, recreation, and government services. EV -la. Education about the local economy. Continue to promote a business -friendly climate by educating decision makers and the public about interrelationships of community life and economic vitality. Disseminate information through the City newsletter, City website, staff reports, the State of the City dinner, and other means. Responsibility: City Manager, Economic Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time EV -lb. Economic database. Maintain databases, generally available to the public, of economic and demographic information to support attainment of economic goals. Protect confidential economic data. Responsibility: Community Development, Economic Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time EV -2. Seek, Retain, and Promote Businesses that Enhance San Rafael. Recruit and retain businesses that contribute to our economic vitality, thus helping to provide needed local goods, services and employment, and enhance the City's physical environment. EV -2a. Business Retention. Continue the business retention program in partnership with the Chamber of Commerce to keep existing businesses thriving in San Rafael. Responsibility: Economic Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time, Partnership The City partners with the San Rafael Chamber of Commerce to support new businesses. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / ECONOMIC VITALITY 145 EV -2b. Infill and Reuse Opportunities. Identify redevelopment opportunities and expansion potential and make this information available for the real estate community. Prepare an inventory of vacant and underutilized sites that could be redeveloped for more beneficial use. Address the type of infill appropriate, intensity of use, fiscal impacts, other likely impacts, and timing/phasing issues. Responsibility: Economic Development, Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing (Inventory: Long Term) Resources: Staff Time See EV -16a (Public/Private Partnerships). EV -2c. Partnership with the Chamber. Continue to support the Chamber of Commerce's business promotion and recruitment efforts. Responsibility: Economic Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time EV -2d. Promoting Revenue -Generating Businesses. Enhance San Rafael's fiscal climate by promoting high revenue -generating industries, such as automotive sales, building trades and home furnishings. Responsibility: City Manager, Economic Development, Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time EV -2e. Street Vendors. Continue to implement regulations and Dermit procedures for mobile vendors.adopting, ar.ardinanee fgulvr agti ritie8 Of s* -Oe* ..o^a^�� Responsibility: Community Development, City Attorney Timeframe: Short Te Resources: Staff Time EV -3. Tourism. Recognize and support tourism as a significant contributor to San Rafael's economy. EV -3a. Tourism Strategies. Explore strategies to take advantage of tourism opportunities in the County, to improve hotel and conference facilities in San Rafael, and to support the City's, Chamber's and Business Improvement District's tourism enhancement programs. Responsibility: Economic Development, Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time EV -4. Local Economic and Community Impacts. In addition to review of environmental, traffic and community design impacts, take the following into account when major projects, policies and land use decisions are under review: • Fiscal impacts on the City's ability to provide and maintain infrastructure and services. • Impacts on the community such as the provision of jobs which match the local workforce, commute reduction proposals, and affordable housing. • Additional or unique economic, fiscal and job-related impacts. • Fiscal and community impacts of not approving a project, plan or policy. EV -4a. Economic impacts. Continue and expand identification and evaluation of relevant economic impacts in staff reports to Planning Commission and City Council. Responsibility: Community Development, Economic Development, City Manager Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time 146 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / ECONOMIC VITALITY Amended 1/13/2016 EV -5. Strengthen Positive Relationships. Strengthen the positive working relationships among the business community, neighborhoods, surrounding communities and City government. EV -5a. Marin County Economic Commission. Work with the Marin County Economic Commission on shared approaches to the economic health of the region and on ways to encourage businesses to remain in and move to San Rafael. Responsibility: Economic Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time EV -5b. Communications with Residents. Regularly communicate with residents regarding relevant economic issues. Maintain consistent and accessible contact with residents through, for example, monthly meetings with neighborhood associations, and the City newsletter and website. Responsibility: City Manager Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time EV -5c. Chamber of Commerce and Business Improvement District. Continue regular meetings to coordinate with and support the Chamber of Commerce and Downtown Business Improvement District. Responsibility: Economic Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time See G -8a (Information about Community Issues) EV -6. Shop Locally. Encourage local purchase of goods and services by residents, workers, businesses and City government so as to cycle dollars back into our local economy and generate revenue for the City. EV -6a. Event Promotion. Continue to promote events that bring people to Downtown, Northgate and other community commercial centers to support local businesses. i Responsibility: City Manager, Economic i Development, Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time EV -6b. Education about `Shop Locally.' Support the Chamber of Commerce and the Business Improvement District in their efforts to educate people about the benefits of shopping locally. Responsibility: Economic Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time Double Rainbow is a popular local business. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / ECONOMIC VITALITY 147 EV -6c. Local Preference. Where other factors, such as price, are equal, the City should give preference to purchasing goods and services from local vendors. Responsibility: City Manager Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time EV -7. Environmentally -Friendly Business Practices. Promote environmentally friendly business practices that reduce the need for non- renewable resources. EV -7a. Green Business Practices. Coordinate with Marin County, environmental organizations and the Chamber of Commerce to promote green business practices (alternate transportation modes, energy conservation, water conservation, packaging reduction, etc.) and the County's Green Business Certification Program. Previous accomplishments have included promotion of environmentally-friendlv business practices through the Citv's sustainabilitv web pates, obtaining a Breen business certification for the City Hall, and Citv staff's participation with the Chamber of Commerce Green Business Committee and help in vromotine Breen businesses. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Shaft Resources: Staff Time 148 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / ECONOMIC VITALITY Amended 1/13/2016 GOAL 9: A RANGE OF GOODS AND SERVICES The goal of San Rafael is to have an economy that provides a full range of goods and services, business, employment, educational and training opportunities, and ample work force housing. San Rafael's economy is balanced. The City enjoys a broad diversity in its local business communities, which include industrial concerns, knowledge-based companies, professional and financial services, retail, cultural and entertainment providers, and restaurateurs. EV -8. Diversity of our Economic Base. Keep San Rafael a full-service city by retaining and supporting a broad and healthy range of businesses. EV -8a. Industrial Zoning. Maintain zoning for industrial areas to the extent feasible to prevent a loss of industrial businesses. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time EV -8b. Day Laborers. (Deleted) Assist rryim,-,at"Wz3rriate and eenveni Respeasibilityi City Manager-, Reseufeesi Staff Time EV -9. Business Assistance Programs. Support the creation and retention of programs that assist small businesses. EV -9a. Business Education. Work with the Chamber of Commerce and other public and private organizations to strengthen business education programs. Responsibility: Economic Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time EV -9b. Business Incubation. Evaluate the feasibility for business mentoring and incubation programs that could be undertaken in cooperation with public, institutional and/or private sector partners. Responsibility: Economic Development Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / ECONOMIC VITALITY 149 EV- 10.Cooperation with Local Training and Education Efforts. Assist and support the efforts of business associations, labor organizations, businesses, non-profit organizations, cities, county, state, and schools in providing job and language skills training programs and business education. EV -10a. City Internships and Mentoring. Continue to participate in mentoring and internship programs, including cooperation with other agencies and organizations. Responsibility: All Departments Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time EV -10b. English as a Second Language. Continue to support community wide efforts to provide English as a Second Language (ESL) training, citizenship, and other educational priorities as expressed by neighborhoods. Responsibility: Community Services, Library Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees, Grants EV -10c. Workforce Education. Support the education of the workforce in order to strengthen skills needed to fill jobs in the community. Responsibility: All Departments Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time See EV -9a (Business Education) and EV -9b (Business Incubation). EV -11. Promotion of Workplace Alternatives. Promote the establishment of workplace alternatives, including home-based businesses, telecommuting and satellite work centers. EV -11 a. Home Occupations. Work with neighborhood organizations and business owners to reexamine and update home occupation zoning regulations to reflect changing trends. Continue to enforce compliance of unlicensed home businesses. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time Autodesk is a leading employer in promoting workplace alternatives. EV -11b. Telecommute Policy. Consider establishing a telecommute policy for City employees. Responsibility: City Manager Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time EV -11c. Workplace Alternatives. Encourage employers to offer workplace alternatives and promote the formation of satellite business centers. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time EV -12. Workforce Housing. Aggressively encourage creation and retention of workforce housing, both owner and renter -occupied especially for public safety and community service personnel. 150 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / ECONOMIC VITALITY Amended 1/13/2016 EV -12a. Benefits of Workforce Housing Educate residents regarding the benefits to the community of workforce housing. Responsibility: Community Development, Economic Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time EV -12b. Housing Opportunities for Local Public Service Workers. Aggressively support efforts to build and retain workforce housing opportunities for local public service workers such as, but not limited to, public safety employees and community service personnel. Responsibility: Community Development, Economic Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time See H -4b (Community Collaboration)14 24 (Contributions T,...,., d,. En. V�o yew Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / ECONOMIC VITALITY 151 GOAL 10: DISTINCTIVE BUSINESS AREAS It is the goal for San Rafael to have vital and attractive business areas, each with a distinctive character and emphasis. San Rafael has a broad spectrum of businesses. The business areas within Downtown, North San Rafael, East San Rafael, West Francisco Boulevard and the Miracle Mile maintain the community's position as a full service city. In addition to these districts, there are distinct, attractive and convenient neighborhood -serving retail centers. Each of these areas has a unique economic role that contributes to and helps maintain San Rafael's position as a full service city: • Downtown and the surrounding core area set the tone of the city. • North San Rafael offers the City's largest employers, Kaiser Hospital, light industry and offices areas and the City's only regional mall. • East San Rafael houses the building industry, auto retail and repair businesses, and offices. • West Francisco Boulevard includes retail with convenient freeway access, auto sales and services, and the building trades. • The Miracle Mile (Fourth Street between Second Street and San Anselmo) comprises a linear commercial corridor oriented towards a major thoroughfare with retail, restaurant and personal service uses. EV -13. Business Areas. Promote San Rafael's economy and the strengths and benefits of all of its business areas. Pursue actions that revitalize and sustain San Rafael's business areas such as: • Planning and managing the supply and operations of parking. • Beautification efforts along City public areas, such as installation and maintenance of planters, street trees, and lighting. • Housing and economic development. • Multi -modal circulation improvements for residents, workers, suppliers and customers. EV -13a. Zoning Regulations. Review zoning and development regulations for each business area and make sure that they are consistent, with the objective of strengthening the unique economic role of each area. Responsibility: Community Development, Economic Development Timeframe: Short Te Resources: Staff Time See C -14a (Transit Network), C-30 (Downtown Parking), I -8a (Street Tree Program), LU - 2a (Development Review), H-14c23b (Continue to Implement Zoning Provisions Standards to Encourage Mixed Use), NH -10 (Neighborhood Centers), NH -11 (Needed Neighborhood Serving Uses) and Neighborhood Element policies related to the specific commercial areas. 152 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / ECONOMIC VITALITY Amended 1/13/2016 EV -14. Support for Business Areas. Support and encourage public and private redevelopment and upgrading of both existing and underdeveloped commercial and industrial properties, while retaining economic and architectural diversity. See LU -2a (Development Review) -and 111I-1 ✓ a `E. pansio of the NC DLtriot; EV -15. Mutual Support Between Business Areas and Adjacent Neighborhoods. Promote productive relationships between residential neighborhoods and adjoining business areas to foster positive interaction. EV -15a. Business/Neighbor Collaboration. Seek innovative ways for businesses and their residential neighbors to collaboratively solve mutual concerns. Encourage conflict resolution between businesses and neighbors. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time, Partnerships EV -15b. Neighborhood Upgrades. Through development review, encourage neighborhood -friendly improvements, such as pedestrian and bicycle facilities and gathering places where appropriate that can be used by workers and residents. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: chnOngoing Resources: Staff Time See NH -14 (Gathering Places and Events). Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / ECONOMIC VITALITY 153 GOAL 11: CREATIVE INFILL The goal of San Rafael is to have creative infill development and redevelopment that takes maximum advantage of our existing resources. Little vacant land remains in San Rafael. Further development will have to be extremely creative, utilizing infill wherever possible, together with redevelopment designed to obtain the highest and best use of our limited space, and the preservation of open space and ecologically -sensitive areas. In some areas, reinvestment is needed to upgrade or replace buildings and make other improvements so that these commercial areas are more competitive and better serve the community. EV -16. Partnerships for Infill Development. Encourage public/private partnerships as one means of redeveloping and revitalizing deteriorated and underdeveloped areas. EV -16a. Public/Private Partnerships. Identify and pursue promising public/private opportunities for partnerships in infill development. Responsibility: Community Development, Economic Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time See EV -13a (Zoning Regulations), EV -2b (Infill and Reuse Opportunities). EV -17. Development Review. Expedite the development review process by encouraging design excellence, and effective community involvement. EV -17a. Pre -submittal Process. Review the pre -submittal process to identify ways to foster quality project submittals. Refine the neighborhood notification and meeting procedures to ensure productive involvement in the development review process. Periodically update the pre-amplication process and public notice requirements for streamlinine and consistency. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Short TermOn _going Resources: Staff Time, Fees See LU -2a (Development Review), CD- IOa (Visual Compatibility), CD -1 la (Compatibility of Building Patterns), CD -12a (Landscaping), and CD -15a (Notification and Information about Development Projects). 154 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / ECONOMIC VITALITY Amended 1/13/2016 Circulation Introduction San Rafael is situated in the heart of Marin County, at the crossroads of Highway 101and Interstate 580. Given its central location, geographic constraints and vital economy, San Rafael experiences significant traffic and congestion. Concern about congestion is consistently ranked high among residents polled. While traffic congestion is a sign of an active and vital local economy and community, as congestion increases it can frustrate drivers, waste fuel, contribute to pollution and reduce potential productivity and recreational time. Through careful circulation planning, San Rafael has maximized the traffic capacity of its older network of streets. Examples include one-way streets in Downtown, the Loop in East San Rafael, new connections such as Andersen Drive and Lincoln/Los Ranchitos, and improved signal timing. While the City has little control over regional traffic that passes through San Rafael on Highways 101 and 580, and Second and Third Streets, it can continue to monitor local roadway congestion, construct roadway improvements, encourage walking and biking, and support regional initiatives and projects that will provide a greater range of transportation options. Overview of Key Recommendations San Rafael's key circulation improvement strategy is to create as safe and well- managed transportation network that provides greater choice for the traveler and limits, or even reduces, congestion on our roads. Various roadway improvements, improved regional and local transit, expanded bicycle and pedestrian networks, and improved connections between the different modes will help to lessen reliance on the single occupancy vehicle and reduce emissions. Additionally, Land Use and Housing policies supporting mixed-use development, higher densities around transit hubs, and retention of neighborhood retail and services will further promote transit use and help reduce new trips. Proposals in this Element that will help accomplish the above include the following: • A greater City leadership role in the pursuit of regional transportation funding, planning and improvement strategies, with strong advocacy for passage of a transportation tax to help fund local transit, and roadway and highway projects. • Continued City monitoring and management of San Rafael congestion through level of service standards, signal timing, and other means. • Local roadway and regional highway interchange improvements to increase safety, improve flow and reduce congestion. • Completion of a continuous High Occupancy Vehicle lane on Highway 101. • Improved and expanded local bus service, and increased express bus service. • Increased regional ferry service. • New commuter rail service between Sonoma and Marin Counties. • Inter -modal transit hubs Downtown and in North San Rafael to support transit use. Our Foundation Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 /CIRCULATION 155 • Implementation of the San Rafael Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan to provide an expanded bikeway and sidewalk network and greater overall support for biking and walking. • Support of implementation of the North San Rafael Promenade. • Support of transportation demand management programs and techniques to encourage less driving. • Support of local school districts' efforts to increase school bus and crossing guard services and to expand participation in the Countywide Safe Routes to Schools program. Background A number of key changes over the past decade have contributed to higher traffic volumes in San Rafael and Marin County as whole: • County residents are making more trips per day. The average number of trips per household has increased by more than 10% since 1990. This is due in part to lifestyle changes such as two -worker families, flextime, more scheduled youth activities, and a larger retired senior population, all of which contribute to the greater number of household trips and also to greater off-peak hour traffic. T r a n s i t a n d Pa r a t r a n s I t Transit services include bus, rail, shuttle, airporter, private bus, and taxi services. Paratransit services are specifically targeted to individuals who have difficulty using regular transit services, including older adults and persons with disabilities. • Peak period trips are being made for many purposes. School trips alone account for 21 % of morning commute traffic in the County, as more parents drive their children to school in response to the absence of safe conditions for biking and walking, and lack of school bus service. San Rafael's worst traffic congestion tends to occur during the a.m. peak period. • More trips are being made inside Marin County. Marin County is now more of a job center and less of a bedroom community. This is especially true in San Rafael. The majority of trips generated by Marin County residents stay within the county. • Marin attracts workers from surrounding counties. As a job center, Marin County attracts workers from outlying areas, such as Sonoma County, that provide more affordable housing. More than half of southbound a.m. peak period trips at the Sonoma -Marin border are bound for Marin. • New development has generated more traffic. Over the past decade San Rafael, surrounding communities and surrounding counties have experienced growth, creating more regional traffic during peak and non -peak periods. In San Rafael, new nonresidential development over the past decade has generated needed sales tax and services, and business diversity; however, this development has resulted in more traffic. During the same period, San Rafael's highway infrastructure has experienced only minor improvements, and capacity has not been substantially increased. The 101/580 interchange is inadequate and due for reconfiguration. A continuous High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lane through Marin County along Highway 101 is not yet complete in San Rafael, contributing to bottlenecks and backups. Because there are too few east - west crossings, San Rafael experiences back ups on and near the 101 and 580 ramps. Additionally, there are limited direct north -south alternative routes parallel to 156 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CIRCULATION Amended 1/13/2016 101, which places more pressure on 101 as drivers use it for local trips throughout the day. This also puts more pressure on local streets as drivers seek indirect alternative routes when 101 is backed up. It is largely because of these factors that, according to the Metropolitan Transportation Commission, in 2001, southbound traffic on 101 through San Rafael during the a.m. peak hour ranked fourth among Bay Area highway congestion spots. In addition to congestion along 101 and 580, Second and Third Streets provide a major east/west route for San Anselmo and West Marin County residents. Between 2000 and 2020, Marin County is expected to grow by 11 percent while Sonoma County, Napa County and the Bay Area region are expected to grow by 20 percent. It is clear that some of San Rafael's congestion is due to regional traffic over which the City has little control. Even if the City limited further development entirely, congestion would continue to grow in San Rafael as a result of growth in surrounding communities. At the same time, there are limited alternatives to the automobile for travel within San Rafaeland Mar'r}. While percentage of those who drove alone decreased, the single occupant vehicle remains the dominant form of travel. The table below compares the modes of travels, illustratina that some alternatives to drivina alone have increased over time but drivina alone continues to be the most common wav to commute for San Rafael residents.A. the table heln�a she;.ic there hods heen fpw nhonee6 in overall workers 16 and elder. \A/hen GOMM here, 18 L\Ad elder a ssurveyed,,, theZ+drl.� e nuc mode shore nlimbs toonrciumc�y ercert ' �ther su;c. The single enol panne vehinle is nleorly the dominsnt ferm f travel . ,� Repeatedly, traffic congestion has been identified as a top issue of concern for San Rafael residents. It was identified as a top concern during development of General Plan 2020 in both the Trends and Issues Reports, in which participants ranked Exhibit 19: San Rafael Commuter* Mode S p l i t Commute Mode 1990 2000 2013 Work at home 1,280 5.0% 1,854 6.5% 2,318 1 8.1 Drive alone 17,120 65.5% 18,166 64.0% 17,512 161.2% 3,176 Carpool 3,274 12.5% 3,353 12.0% 111.1% Transit and Paratransit 2,993 11.5% 3,519 12.5% 3,262 111.4% Walk 948 3.5% 903 3.0% 1,374 4.8% Other (including bicycle) 324 2.0% 664 2.0% 944 3.3% *Workers 16 years and over. SOURCE: U.S. Census, 1990, 2000: American Communitv Survev 2013. congestion as one of the top three issues facing San Rafael. The County, in a series of recent reports culminating in its 25 -Year Transportation Vision for Marin County concludes that expanding transportation choice is the only realistic way to manage congestion and improve mobility. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 /CIRCULATION 157 The Circulation Element of the General Plan is closely tied to the Land Use Element. The Circulation element ensures that the transportation network — including roads, transit, and bicycle and pedestrian facilities are designed to accommodate the City into the future. The focus of this element is on managing the City's infrastructure, expanding transportation options for San Rafael citizens, and allowing patterns of development that support walking, bicycling and transit use as alternatives to driving. Transportation Successes Since the 1980s Since adoption of General Plan 2000 in 1988, the City has been successful in helping improve the local circulation system on several fronts. Key accomplishments include: • Making land use changes in the Downtown area that support transit over the long run, including more housing and development that includes a variety of uses (mixed-use development). • Establishing and monitoring Level of Service (LOS) standards for signalized intersections throughout San Rafael. • Developing the Priority Projects Procedure (PPP) to allocate growth based on limited traffic capacity. • Improving traffic flow and connections by making major roadway improvements including the Lincoln/Los Ranchitos connector, the Merrydale Overcrossing, Andersen Drive, reconfiguration of the Civic Center Drive intersection, "The Loop" in East San Rafael, Downtown signal timing, and a new lane on Second Street between Lindaro and Hetherton. • Supporting regional efforts to create a continuous High Occupancy Vehicle lane through Marin County. J -14v cL\n PO&vc M„F+,, R ,s SGhe dull d to begin nStru .tier ;nom • Introducing traffic calming techniques to reduce speeds and increase safety on residential streets. Adopting and begiRRiRg 'MpleMeRtate ^f the San Rafael Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan in 2002. The plan was updated in 2004 and implementation has been underway. • Completing the North San Rafael Promenade Conceptual Plan in 2002, outlining pedestrian and bicycle connections between neighborhoods in Terra Linda and commercial and cultural areas in Northgate and the Marin County. Civic Center. • Constructing the Downtown Transportation Center, serving regional transit users. • 9egiRRiRGIComDlete construction of a 400 -car parking garage Downtown an 2093. • Participating in various regional transportation planning efforts through the County Congestion Management Agency (CMA), the Water Transportation Agency (WTA), the Golden Gate Bridge and Highway and Transportation District (GGBHTD) and the new Sonoma Marin Area Rapid Transit (SMART) Authority. • Supporting the countywide Safe Routes to School program that has reduced single occupancy vehicle trips in participating San Rafael schools by up to 15 percent. 158 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CIRCULATION Amended 1/13/2016 • City Council accepted the Downtown Station Area Plan and Civic Center Station Area Plan passed in 2012. The Citv will continue to collaborate with transit agencies and make infrastructure improvements. Citv Council adopted a Complete Streets Policv by Resolution 14088 (March 21, 2016), that supersedes the "Complete Streets Directive" issued by the Department of Public Works on February 24, 2011. The Complete Streets Policv was adopted to comply with the California Complete Streets Act of 2008 (AB 1358) as well as the California Global Warmina Solution Act of 2006 (AB 32). This policv provides procedures and criteria for establishinq a comprehensive, intearated transportation network with infrastructure and design solutions that allow for safe and convenient travel along and across streets for all users. Further, the Resolution directs that the Citv shall incorporate Complete Street policies and principals, consistent with AB 1358, as part of the next substantial revision of the Citv of San Rafael General Plan circulation element. Circulation Needs in San Rafael A brief overview of circulation needs is presented below, and discussed in more detail under the relevant Circulation Goals that follow. Roadway conditions for Baseline (existing conditions with approved projects) and 2020 are in Appendix C. Roadway Improvements Because San Rafael is impacted by regional traffic, reducing congestion and decreasing the frequency of incidents on Highways 101 and 580 are important to improving traffic flow and reducing congestion in San Rafael. More connections between neighborhoods for pedestrian, bicycle and automobiles are also needed. Some residential streets impacted by traffic generated outside the neighborhood could also benefit from traffic calming techniques to improve safety. Roadway conditions are closely monitored in order to identify other circulation improvements needed to improve flow or increase safety. School Transportation City studies have estimated that 21 percent of a.m. peak traffic is caused by school - related traffic. Studies also show that 10 percent of students use a school bus for transport to school, while 75 percent arrive by car. Many parents feel it is unsafe for students to ride the bus or bike or walk to school. The countywide Safe Routes to School program is addressing these issues. Transit Users The Marin Transit Futures Report presents the following relevant findings regarding local transit needs. Though based on countywide needs, these findings also apply to San Rafael. • Over two-thirds of all transit riders in Marin are transit dependent. • Approximately 60 percent of all local transit trips are considered by users to be the primary way they get to work. • The heaviest concentration of ridership occurs in the Downtown and Canal neighborhoods, which together account for 41 percent of all transit trips in the county. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 /CIRCULATION 159 • Transit users in the San Rafael Basin share the following characteristics: 70 percent of riders are 19-45 years of age; 70percent are transit dependent; 70 percent ride transit at least five days a week; and 65percent earn less than $20,000/year. The heaviest used routes in the County are in the Canal Neighborhood, served primarily by routes 20 and 35. • Users in Las Gallinas Valley are older, with riders 65 and older comprising 18.2 percent of total ridership compared with a countywide average of 5.4 percent. There are fewer riders aged 19-29 than elsewhere in the county. Additionally, most riders use transit less regularly than elsewhere in the county. Transit Services The Marin Countv Transit District Transit Authority of Marin and Golden Gate Bridge, Highway and Transportation District provide local and regional bus service, with connection to surrounding neighborhoods, communities and counties. Transit within San Rafael primarily consists of bus service, however with the completion of the Sonoma Marin Area Rail Transit (SMART) system, residents of San Rafael will also be able to make rail trips within the North Bay.9n November 2, 2003 the f_elden rate miniere resu ltinn in C 22 p-ment red, iC+inn of sepdr-e n"eroll. In men P:afasl, ferry peak hour eyernrGwdling Mme sen,ines wtzre res+nredl fn -.r Rn ---to U In the al n men P:afae' "�� Can Anselmn (' its systemwide were primarily +e lew ridershiproutes. e�-zsanI+swere �that fnr weekday, 1 7 Percen+� f passengor trips hsd RG seFViee alteMative, and 26.1 n nn+ of passnnnor trips had -a route segmeRt enminates� but hsd alternative and nompursble sepdGe available. Ger 15.8 n en+ of weekday n nor trips, headways (amnY Rt of time between b uses\ 0ncreased 30 minuteste one heur. Alse systemwide, GUtS Were rye severe eR the weekend&,sth 2Z 1 p9men+ of pas&ennor trips hoing „o se . e altema+ive and 36.6 peFGent Of rcN�^rlgor trips hC?Jng a reute segment eliminated! but with alternative and! somporoWe seWiGe available. Cor 14.0 nernent of weekend) n r trips headways inCreasedl 30 m ni 1tes +n nee hour. Bus. Marin County Transit District and Golden Gate Bridge, Highway and Transportation District provide local and regional bus service, with connections to surrounding neighborhoods, communities and counties. Shuttles. Several City -sponsored and private shuttles were previously operated in the 1980s and 1990s in San Rafael but were discontinued due to low ridership. A 2002 study to consider the feasibility of City shuttle with connections between Downtown and major employers concluded shuttle service is not currently a viable option. In 2015, the Golden Gate Bridae, Hiahwav and Transportation District instituted a pilot proaram for a shuttle service between the San Rafael transit center and the Larkspur ferry terminal. Commuter Rail. The Sonoma Marin Area Rail Transit (SMART) Commission was formed in 1995 to study possible rail service between Cloverdale and San Rafael using the former Northwestern Pacific Railroad Authority right-of-way. In 2003, the Commission became the SMART Authority. Construction beaan in Mav 2012. The SMART rail corridor parallels Hiahwav 101.An-oRv'FeRmontul impaGt Fep914 us being prepared to evaluate the -proposed se;viGe, and-a-ba4ve me"vIrg is-a„de consideration for November 2006 to provide funding for the Commuter line The 160 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CIRCULATION Amended 1/13/2016 two SMART stations in San Rafael are planned for the Civic Center area and the downtown area. Phase 1 Dassenaer service of SMART, a connection between Airport Boulevard in Santa Rosa and downtown San Rafael, is expected to beain in late 2016. Phase 2 extends the rail service; the system would connect Larkspur to Cloverdale. Other Transit. Sonoma and Marin Airporter services connect riders with the Oakland and San Francisco airports; Greyhound Bus service provides national bus service, and private taxi companies provide taxi service. Paratransit Services Paratransit services are small-scale transit services catering to special needs populations such as the elderly or disabled. Under contract from Marin Countv Transit District, Whistlestop Wheels provides demand -responsive service for elderly and disabled citizens that qualify for Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) paratransit service. Marin Countv Transit District estimates that the growinq senior population countvwide will create a growth in annual paratransit ridership from approximately 125,000 to 180,000, between 2014 and 2024. Local paratransit service operated by WhistlestoD Wheels will continue to serve an important role in Drovidinq mobilitv and access for a portion of that need located in San Rafael. : p c�rcnL�t 0nGrease d 28 n eRt betweon 199E snd 2000 Rd is expeGted to inGFCQM 22940 MeFe by 2020in 2000 appreximately 38 of Whistlestep Wheels' weekly Marin Ge un+„ trips had a GFigiR r deStiRati„n in the Son P/ifaol Aspin nL f IlincT \ a' . The D int Bicycling and Pedestrian Facilities In 2002, the City adopted the San Rafael Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan. The Plan outlines the need for an expanded network or bikeways and pedestrian pathways and sidewalks, as well as end -of -trip facilities and public education about the merits of bicycling and safety. Furthermore, in 2016 the Citv adopted the "Complete Streets Policv", which provides procedures and criteria for ceratina and maintaininq complete street systems that provide safe, comfortable and convenient travel along and across Citv streets for all users. Parking Facilities Parking supply throughout the City is limited and must be managed based on the adjacent land uses it serves. Downtown requires a flexible, urban parking strategy. Some other commercial areas require additional parking. Some residential areas are impacted by on -street parking shortages due to older apartment buildings with inadequate on-site parking, spillover parking from nearby commercial areas, and other factors, and require City assistance in balancing the needs of different parking users. Bicycle parking should be secure, visible and convenient. Ther i� noon+� More bike parking is required on busy commercial roads such as Fourth Street, at the Transportation Center, at shopping and employment centers, and at public parks and recreation centers. Airport Facilities Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 /CIRCULATION 161 San Rafael is served by two international airports at San Francisco and Oakland. Sonoma and Marin Airporters serve these airports. The San Rafael Airport is a privately owned and operated local airport. Marin County operates a small airport for business and pleasure at Gnoss Field, located in Novato. Funding Needs San Rafael's circulation funding comes from Federal, State and local sources, including traffic mitigation fees. Transportation Measure A, a local half -cent sales tax, was passed in November 2004. To support the implementation of much needed transportation improvements, the Citv will seek additional funding and work with the Countv to secure grants and resources that can be utilized by local iurisdictions. Nearly all aa„ Area ^ountiao hsv-v c trcnWcs:v0ion ✓clog talc ths� provides fundiRg-for- tmnoit and related im rnont3, baA eff�o ocA/sbliah gRe OR MaFiR CGURty have tWiGe foiled! Without s soh a tan, It io .Jiff.. 1If to AttraGt the Feder -all o.,dl Qfofe f -Un do r�eedl ed- fn -.r le -r --al im rirnvemenfc Relationship of the Circulation Element to State Law and Other General Plan Elements Consistent with State law, this Circulation Element establishes policies affecting the movement of people, goods, and vehicles within and through the City, and meets other requirements as outlined by the Governor's Office of Planning and Research. Specifically, the State requires the Circulation Element to identify the extent and location of existing and proposed major thoroughfares, transportation routes, terminals, any military airports and ports, and other local utilities and facilities, all correlated with the land use element of the plan. The Infrastructure Element addresses other local utilities and facilities. The Circulation Element is related to other elements of the General Plan as follows: • Land Use Element. See policies concerning timing development with circulation improvements and growth allocation. See also policies concerning mixed use, infill and transit -oriented approaches to higher density development. • Community Design Element. See policies concerning transportation corridor improvement programs, street trees and parking lot landscaping. • Infrastructure Element. See policies concerning the Capital Improvement Program and street maintenance, including street pavement, sweeping, lighting and sidewalk maintenance. • Safety Element. See policies concerning access for emergency vehicles and emergency roadway connectors. • Air and Water Quality Element. See policies concerning promotion of circulation alternatives, including low -emission vehicles. • Neighborhoods Element. See policies concerning safe streets, street appearance, creating pedestrian friendly environments, bicycle and pedestrian paths, parking, open space access, San Rafael Airport, and specific road improvement and access projects. GOAL 12: A LEADERSHIP ROLE IN TRANSPORTATION It is the goal of San Rafael to take a leadership role in developing regional transportation solutions. San Rafael is proud of the leadership role it has taken in 162 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CIRCULATION Amended 1/13/2016 planning and securing funding for regional transportation projects that expand travel choices for local citizens. Through working closely with regional transportation planning agencies, funding sources and service providers, the City continues to play a pivotal role in making highway connections more efficient, improving bus service, establishing commuter rail service, expanding ferry service, and creating an extensive Countywide bikeway network. Transportation is a regional issue that must be addressed on a regional level. The Transportation Authoritv of Marin (TAM) is the County's Congestion Management Agency (CMA) was formed in the early 1990s to address M a r i n C o u n t y' s regional transportation T r a n s p o r t a t i o n V i s i o n planning and funding needs. San Rafael, located centrally in The City of San Rafael's policies are the county and the largest city compatible with efforts by Marin County to in Marin, can play a major role improve transportation choices as outlined in in shaping the future of Moving Forward - A 25 -Year Transportation transportation in Marin. Vision for Marin County (2003), which Through the City's participation advocates the following: • Improved and expanded local bus service. on the boards of the CMA, the • Countywide school bus service and support Golden Gate Bridge and of the Safe Routes to School program. Highway Transportation District • Local roadway and highway interchange (GGBHTD), and the new improvements. Sonoma -Marin Area Rail • Completion of a continuous High Transit (SMART) Authority, the Occupancy Vehicle lane on Highway 101. City of San Rafael has a • Transit Centers to serve as inter -modal significant voice in matters of hubs. regional significance. On a • New commuter rail service. wider regional scale, the City • Increased express bus service. also partidpates in Water • Increased ferry service. planning efforts affecting Rani A -ea ferry service and monitors Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC) planning activities that affect Bay Area -wide transportation decisions. The Lev issue affepting Marin County's regien'1 trsns funding. Unlikeost Bay Area GOunties Marin County is "self help" GO unty as it does not have a transportation sales tax to fund readdi.A.fay ai4,d transit imprg���t6. This severely limits the ability of Marin County transportation agenGieS too attrant State and Federal rnatGhing funds fer le -r --al transportation PFGjeGts. The Gity supports future efforts p&+CC tha tax because it is essential to provide needed f nding for improvements to roadways and trans'} C-1. Regional Transportation Planning. Actively coordinate with other jurisdictions, regional transportation planning agencies, and transit providers to expand and improve local and regional transportation choice. Work cooperatively to improve transit and paratransit services, achieve needed highway corridor improvements, and improve the regional bicycling network. As part of this effort, support implementation of Marin County's 25 -Year Transportation Vision. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 /CIRCULATION 163 C -la. Participation in CMA, MTC and Other Regional Transportation Planning Efforts. Continue to participate in and monitor activities of regional transportation planning agencies, including but not limited to the Transportation Authority of Marint4e Turin Goury Congestion Management ^ gene., and the Metropolitan Transportation Commission, and actively support implementation of Marin County's 25 -Year Transportation Vision. Responsibility: City Council, Public Works, Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time C -lb. Public Information About Transportation. Through public workshops, neighborhood meetings, staff reports and other means, provide public information and education on local transportation conditions, behavior, issues and improvement options. Hold at least one traffic and transportation workshop annually to update the public on conditions and proposed improvements. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time C-2. Regional Transportation Funding. Support a regional funding approach to pay for transportation improvements to transit, highway corridors, and bicycle routes and facilities by seeking a broad range of federal, state and local funds to help pay for these improvements. Use locally generated funds to leverage/match outside funding sources. C -2a. Local Transportation Tax. (Deleted) To „ ide a dedie,,toa funding sotifee for - needed roeded l,.ca t..awpoa*4k�n i.mr ..e e..ts or -k off etiyel . f - the passage of a Mar -in Rwrzxn ilxlltyCity T.'rannago , Pulmlic Wef" Ti fiamo, Shoot Te . Resewees! Staff Time C -2b. Transportation Project Grants. Work with governmental agencies, non -profits and community groups to secure grants for appropriate transportation projects. Responsibility: Public Works, Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time C-3. Seeking Transportation Innovation. Take a leadership role in looking for opportunities to be innovative and experiment with transportation improvements and services. C -3a. Transportation Technology. Use the most effective technologies in managing the City's roadways and congestion. For example, support timed connections at transit hubs, and promote the use of transportation information systems. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time, Mitigation Fees 164 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CIRCULATION Amended 1/13/2016 GOAL 13: MOBILITY FOR ALL USERS It is the goal of San Rafael to have a diversified, cost-effective and resource - efficient transportation network that provides mobility for all users. Our transportation system is safe and responsive to the needs of San Rafael residents, workers and visitors. It provides a range of travel options that include improved highway and roadway connections, expanded bus service, new commuter rail, smaller scale transit options responsive to special populations, and an excellent network of bikeways and pedestrian paths. Our transit and paratransit systems effectively serve a broad spectrum of users, including commuters, youth, seniors and people with disabilities. Our roadways and parking resources are efficiently managed and accommodate automobiles as well as alternative modes of transportation. San Rafael continues to monitor and limit its local congestion levels using traffic standards. San Rafael and Marin County residents largely rely on the single occupancy vehicle for their transportation needs. While San Rafael continues to be responsive to the needs of automobile drivers, there needs to be a greater set of alternative transportation options, or congestion will continue to grow and the quality of life will degrade as residents and workers spend more time stuck in traffic in their cars. Even if San Rafael were to stop growing entirely, surrounding communities in the region would continue to grow, and congestion will increase. As promoted by the County's 25 -Year Transportation Vision for Marin County and presented in this Element, a more diversified and resource -efficient transportation network offering expanded travel options is needed. Such a system would have less of an impact on the environment as a whole and improve residents' quality of life. The City and community should continue to work together to reduce trips, promote use of alternatives to the single occupancy automobile, reduce school commute trips, encourage employers to implement transportation demand management strategies, and to improve our transit and paratransit services. Effectively Managing San Rafael's Roadways and Congestion Since 1988, San Rafael has used level of service (LOS) standards applied to all signalized intersections. Standards first applied in the P.M. Peak Hours (4 - 6 p.m.) but were later also applied in the A.M. Peak Hours (7 - 9 a.m.) as part of the City's environmental review procedure. Much of the City is approaching the LOS standards limit for many intersections. In order to encourage development that would meet San Rafael's housing and economic vitality goals, even in congested areas, City policy allows for evaluation of projects that exceed LOS standards. Also, in 1988, the City adopted a program called the Priorities Projects Procedure (PPP) that allocated development in portions of North and East San Rafael based on traffic capacity. In 2004, the PPP was replaced with the Project Selection Process (PSP), which implemented the same allocation process citywide. However, by 2011, the purpose and importance of the PSP diminished because: a) the community is now largely built - out and there are very few remaining land development opportunities; and b) the Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 /CIRCULATION 165 limited traffic capacity has been used up or needed transportation improvements have been implemented. In addition, City policy requires that roadway improvements be planned and funded consistent with approved development. The City administers a Traffic Mitigation Fee program, adopted in 1988, that requires development to help fund needed roadway improvements. In designing and maintaining roadways, the City must ensure that they are safe for all users. As alternative modes of transportation become more viable, their accommodation in roadway design will grow in importance. The City must also ensure that emergency vehicles can access all Roadway Design San Rafael uses American Association of State Highway and Transpiration Officials (AASHTO) geometric designs and State and Federal standards to design roadways. portions of the City. This is particularly challenging during periods when high levels of congestion tend to occur. The City therefore has a responsibility to identify alternative routes for emergency vehicles. C-4. Safe Roadway Design. Design of roadways should be safe and convenient for motor vehicles, transit, bicycles and pedestrians. Place highest priority on safety. In order to maximize safety and multimodal mobility, the City Council may determine that an intersection is exempt from the applicable intersection level of service standard where it is determined that a circulation improvement is needed for public safety considerations, including bicycle and pedestrian safety, and/or transit use improvements. C -4a. Street Pattern and Traffic Flow. Support efforts by the City Traffic Engineer to configure or re -configure street patterns so as to improve traffic flow and turning movements in balance with safety considerations and the desire not to widen roads. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: General Fund C -4b. Street Design Criteria to Support Alternative Modes. Establish street design criteria to the extent permitted by State law to support alternative transportation modes to better meet user needs and minimize conflicts between competing modes. Responsibility: Public Works, Fire Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time, Grants C -4c. Appropriate LOS Standards. At the time City Council approves a roadway improvement and safety exemption from the applicable LOS standard, the appropriate LOS will be established for the intersection. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time 166 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CIRCULATION Amended 1/13/2016 C-5. Traffic Level of Service Standards. A. Intersection LOS. In order to ensure an effective roadway network, maintain adequate traffic levels of service (LOS) consistent with standards for signalized intersections in the A.M. and P.M. peak hours as shown below, except as provided for under (B) Arterial LOS. Intersection Level of Service Standards, A.M. and P.M. Peak Hours Location LOS Citywide, except as noted below D a. Downtown except as noted below E 1. Mission Ave. and Irwin F b. Irwin Street and Grand Avenue between E Second Street and Mission Avenue c. Third and Union Streets E* d. Andersen and West Francisco E e. Andersen and Bellam E f. Freitas at Civic Center/Redwood Highway E g. Merrydale at Civic Center Drive E h. Merrydale at Las Gallinas E *Maximum 70 seconds of delay during peak hours. Transportation Authority of Marin (TAM) The Transportation Authority of Marin (TAM) has been designated as the Marin Congestion Management Agency (CMA), which is a Joint Powers Agency established between the County and cities to address Marin's unique transportation issues and to fulfill the legislative requirements of Propositions 111 and 116, B. Arterial LOS. The City Traffic Engineer may apply arterial level of service analysis as the primary method of analysis for any proposed development project. The City Traffic Engineer will make this determination based on intersection spacing and other characteristics of the roadway system where conditions are better predicted by arterial analysis. Where arterial LOS analysis is warranted, a proposed development must be consistent with the following arterial LOS standards. If an intersection LOS is above or below the standard, the project shall be considered consistent with this policy if the arterial LOS is within the standard. The project will not be deemed consistent with this policy if the arterial LOS fails to meet the standard. approved in June -1990. When arterial level of service is applied as the primary method of analysis for a proposed project, the project shall be deemed to be consistent with this policy if it is demonstrated that the arterial LOS standards described below are met regardless of the intersection LOS, or the project shall be deemed to be inconsistent with this policy if the Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CIRCULATION 167 arterial LOS standards are not met regardless of the intersection LOS. 168 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CIRCULATION Amended 1/13/2016 Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CIRCULATION 169 Exhibit 24 I ' Arterial Level of Service Arterial Level of Service Standards, A.M. and P.M. Peak Hours Location LOS MCitywide, eAL;e�L ds ,,Ul6d below D V\ a. Downtown, except as noted below E 1. Congestion Management Segments D [As established by the Marin County Congestion Management Agency] b. Arte .,.6—,J, -OS E & F F (See Appendix C) 0 500 Yp 5500 Meters Lj 1 Miles Arterial Level of Service Standards, A.M. and P.M. Peak Hours Location LOS Citywide, except as noted below D a. Downtown except as noted below E Congestion Management Segments D (Second, Third and Fourth Streets) (as established by the Marin County Congestion Management Agency) b. Arterials operating at LOS E outside F Downtown, and F (1) (1) For arterials operating at LOS E outside Downtown, and F as of the date of adoption of General Plan 2020, see Appendix C. Inl ersection Level of Service (LOS) Arterial LOS What is Level of Service? ■ Level of service (LOS) is a tool to measure operation conditions and congestion levels ■ The LOS criteria and thresholds are different between unsignalized and signalized intersections, and arterials ■ For unsignalized and signalized intersections, LOS is an indication of seconds of delay ■ For arterial segments, LOS is an indication of travel speed and delay at intersections ■ The methodology used to prepare General Plan 2020 identified LOS levels from A to F, based on the amount of vehicle delay at a signalized intersection. The LOS levels are subject to change based on accepted traffic engineering standards. Delay (Sec) F s0+ E 55 D 35 C 20 10 B A F E Speed :d (mph) Delay (Sec) F E 9 D 13 50+ C 19 35 D 25 C B _ 15 10 A 170 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CIRCULATION Amended 1/13/2016 25+ B A C. Exemptions. Signalized intersections at Highway 101 and Interstate 580 onramps and offramps are exempt from LOS standards because delay at these locations is affected by regional traffic and not significantly impacted by local measures. D. Evaluation of Project Merits. In order to balance the City's objectives to provide affordable housing, maintain a vital economy and provide desired community services with the need to manage traffic congestion, projects that would exceed the level of service standards set forth above may be approved if the City Council finds that the benefits of the project to the community outweigh the resulting traffic impacts. C -5a. LOS Methodology. Use appropriate methodologies for calculating traffic Levels of Service, as determined by the City Traffic Engineer. Responsibility: Public Works Time Frame: Ongoing Funding: General Fund C -5b. Monitoring Traffic. To assure acceptable traffic operating standards over time, monitor traffic conditions throughout San Rafael on an ongoing basis. Based on such evaluation, the City Traffic Engineer shall identify traffic mitigations to reduce congestion and address safety concerns. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Funding: General Fund C -5c. Exception Review. When the City Council finds that a project provides significant community benefits yet would result in a deviation from the LOS standards, the City Council may approve such a project through adoption of findings, based on substantial evidence, that the specific economic, social, technological and/or other benefits of the project to the community substantially outweigh the project's impacts on circulation, and that all feasible mitigation measures have been required of the project. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Funding: Fees See also LU -2a (Development Review). C-5.1. Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT) Methodology for Environmental Review of Traffic Impact Pursuant to Public Resources Code § 21099 and 21083 (provided under Senate Bill 743, effective January 2016,) an alternative method for measuring transportation impacts of projects will replace the Level of Service (LOS) methodology. For environmental review, the use of the vehicle miles traveled (VMT) metric will be applied in assessing development Droiects. C -5.1a. Develop a VMT Model. Use VMT in the assessment of traffic impacts for the purposes of environmental review, provided that each nroiect meets the criteria for use of VMT measurements identified under the California Environmental Oualitv Act (CEOA) and that the Citv Traffic Encineer determines the appropriateness of usinc VMT for a rp oject. - - - a. Develop and adopt a VMT model. Incomorate the model into the General Plan Environmental Impact Report b. Implement VMT for CEOA review of proiects Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Oneoine Funding: Fees Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CIRCULATION 171 C-6. Proposed Improvements. The proposed circulation improvements in Exhibit 21 have been identified as potentially needed to improve safety and relieve congestion in San Rafael over the next 20 years. Major Proposed Circulation Improvements include those improvements deemed necessary to maintain City LOS standards. Other recommended roadway improvements, include additional improvements that may become necessary in the long-term and are desirable to enhance San Rafael's circulation system, but are not necessary to maintain LOS standards. Specific improvements will be implemented as conditions require, and will be refined during the design phase. Recognize that other feasible design solutions may become available and be more effective in achieving the same goals as the improvements listed in Exhibit 19, and allow for their implementation, consistent with the most recent engineering standards. As conditions change, planned roadway improvements may be amended, through the annual General Plan Review. Roadway improvements are implemented through the Capital Improvements Program, and are typically funded through a variety of sources, including Traffic Mitigation Fees. Environmental review is required. C -6a. Update Proposed Circulation Improvements. On a regular basis, monitor and update the list of Proposed Circulation Improvements. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time 172 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CIRCULATION Amended 1/13/2016 Exhibit 21 Major Planned Circulation Improvements a Proposed Roadway Improvements Projected Mitigation Cost Fee 1 Smith Ranch Road/Lucas Valley Road $4,000,000 $4,000,000 Widen roadway to provide two westbound and two eastbound lanes between Redwood Highway and Los Gamos and Drovide _pedestrian and bicvcle facilities. Widen northbound 101 off ramp and southbound 101 off ramp for additional right and left turn lanes. 2 Lucas Valley/Los Gamos $2,000,000 $2,000,000 Widen Lucas Valley Road to provide two through lanes for eastbound and westbound, and provide twe westhound left tum lanes -.reconfigure Hie_ hwav 101 ramps and _Drovide _pedestrian and bicvcle facilities. Alide.. seuthbound Las games to provide -2 !a-ues for inn feet an merge i aek to one lane Signalize intersection and coordinate with adjacent intersections. 3 Las Gallinas Avenue (Merrydale to Del Presidio) $300,000 $300,000 Remove parking and widen street to provide four lanes (one southbound, two northbound and one two-way left turn). 4 Freitas/Las Gallinas $650,000 $650,000 Upgrade the traffic signal system and operation. Improve intersection geometry, cover portions of drainage ditch and Drovide _pedestrian and bicvcle facilities. 5 Freitas/Del Presidio $900,000 $900,000 Explore feasibility of double northbound right turn and southbound 101 on ramp widening 6 Freitas/ Northbound 101 Ramps- Redwood- Civic Center $7,500,000 $7,500,000 widening and signalization. Right -of Way,Required-.Interim interchange improvement and sienalization Amended 1/13/2016 Funding Source State & Die Federal ntOther Grants & Sources Projected Project Timing (b) Depends On Development Timing Depends On Development Timing Depends On Development Timing 5-7-year-sUnder design Depends On Development Timing Depends On Development Timing Proposed Roadway Improvements 7 Grand Avenue (south of Grand Avenue bridge to Fourth Street) Widen north/south, add one lane as required, and upgrade traffic signal system. Requires right of way and major bridge widening. Signalize Grand/ Fifth, and restrict parking to provide turn lanes. Signalize Grand/ Mission, and restrict parking to provide turn lanes. 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Francisco Blvd. East (Bellam to Grand Avenue Bridge) Four lanes required. One southbound, one two-way left turn and two northbound lanes. Major right of way required. Signalize Francisco Blvd. East/Harbor. Lincoln Avenue (Second Street to southbound 101 ramps - Hammondale or as required) Extend the existing PM peak northbound Tow -Away zone for AM peak as well (four lanes may be required). This parking restriction is likely to be extended north toward the southbound 101 ramps. Signalize Lincoln/ Grand, and restrict parking to provide turn lanes. Mission/Lincoln Provide additional lanes for northbound, and westbound; upgrade traffic signal system, requires right of way. Fourth Street (Miracle Mile) Re -align Ross Valley and Santa Margarita and re -design intersection operation. LOS may deteriorate but community access will be provided. Additional Signalization Signalize Fifth & H Street, and restrict parking to provide turn lanes. Signalize First/C Street, and restrict parking to provide turn lanes.' - Signalize First/ D Street, and restrict parking to provide turn lanes. Roadwav confieuration changed on D Street between First and Second. 1 On watch due to other improvement. Funding Source Projected Mitigation State & Redevelopme Projected Project Timing (b) Cost Fee Federal ntOther Grants & Sources $6,500,000 $3,250,000 $200,000 $200,000 $200,000 $200,000 $10,000,000 $5,000,000 $200,000 $200,000 $400,000 $400,000 $200,000 $200,000 $4,000,000 $4,000,000 $450,000 $450,000 $100,000 $100,000 $150,000 $150,000 $150,000 $150,000 $3,250,000 Depends On Development Timing 5 7 y€arsDenends On Onerations 5-7-yeafsDenends On Operations $5,000,000 Depends On Development Timing 5-7 yeafsDepends On Operations 3-5 yeafsDepends On Operations 3-5 yeafsDepends On Operations Depends On Development Timing 5-7yearsDepends On Operations 3-feafsDepends On Operations 3-fearsDepends On Operations 3-feafsDepends On Operations Amended 1/13/2016 Proposed Roadway Improvements 15 Signalize Fourth/Union Street, and restrict parking to provide turn lanes. 16 Signalize or Roundabout Mission/Court Street. 17 Signalize Merrydale/Southbound 101 Ramps, and provide turn lanes. (Intersection under monitor) 18 Signalize Lincoln/DuBois/Irwin and re -align intersection. Right of way required. 19 Third/Union Street Widen Union Street to provide 4 lanes between Third and Fourth. Fire Station 4 modification required. Reconfigure Third/Union eastbound left turn pocket. Provide westbound right turn pocket. Upgrade the traffic signal system and operation. 20 Kerner Blvd or Francisco Blvd. East. To Andersen Drive Undercrossing Provide a minimum 3 -lane connector near Shoreline Parkway. Signalize at both ends. 21 Andersen /East Sir Francis Drake -eastbound 580 Ramps Major widening and signalization. 22 Upgrade traffic signal system. 23 Install traffic monitoring sensors and camera system. 24 Install Fiber Optic network throughout the traffic system. Amended 1/13/2016 Projected Mitigation Cost Fee $200,000 $200,000 $200,000 $100,000 $250,000 $250,000 $2,500,000 $900,000 $900,000 $8,000,000 $4,000,000 Funding Source State & Redevelepme Federal ntOther Grants & Sources Projected Project Timing (b) Depends On Development Timing $100,000 Depends On Development Timing 5-7yearsDepends On Operations $2,500,000 Depends On Development Timing 2 yeafsCompleted in 2009 $4,000,000 Depends On Development Timing $2,000,000 $500,000 $1,000,000 $500,000 $3,000,000 $1,500,000 $1,500,000 $1,000,000 $500,000 $500,000 $2,000,000 $1,000,000 $1,000,000 Sub Total $57,950,000 $38,600,000 $4,000,000 $15,350,000 5-7-yearsActively monitoring. Depends On Operations. 7 years Activelv monitoriniz. Improvements underway. 7 yeafs Activelv monitoring. Improvements underway. 7 years Activelv monitoriniz. Improvements underway. Other Proiects Other Projee 25 Implement Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan 26 Pedestrian bridge at Third/Hetherton — GGT Transportation Center 27 Pedestrian and bicvcle bridge to connect Canal Neiehborhood to Andersen Drive/Downtown. 28 Pedestrian and bicvcle bridge to connect Canal Neighborhood to Montecito Shopping Center. 29 Freitas / Northbound 101 Ramps - Redwood -Civic Center or a new flyover from Civic Center Dr. to Freitas. Lone Term Improvement 30 Second Street (from E Street to east side of A Street). The projected volume requires right turn lanes or through/right lanes be added in the long term. Right of way required. 31 North San Rafael Promenade 32 $4,500,000 $1,125,000 $2,250,000 $1,125,000 Proiected Proiect Timing (b) 7-20 years Depends On ODerationsSMART, 10- 20 years 10-20 years $4,000,000 $1,000,000 $2,000,000 $1,000,000 10-20 years $16,000,000-1 $7,000.0006-,$7,000,0006;-0 $2,000,000 Depends On Development Timing 2,000,000 000,000 00,000 ffundine source incorporates all amounts from previous program 311 $6,000,000 $1,500,000 $1,500,000 $3,000,000 10-20 years $2,000,000 $1,000,000 $1,000,000 Sub Total Other Projects $39,800,000 $14,775,000 $17,400,000 $7,625,000 Grand Total Project Cost $97,750,000 10-20 years (a) Priorities for circulation improvements are set in the Capital Improvements Program. This list may be amended as part of the five-year General Plan update. (b) The timing for the improvements depends on the size, type and phasing of additional development. Policies LU -2 (Development Timing) requires findings when project - related traffic will not cause the LOS to be exceeded. Source: San Rafael Public Works Department Amended 1/13/2016 Funding Source Projected City State & Redevelopn}e Cost Mitigation Federal n1 TAM and Fee Other Grants and Sources $5,300,000 $2,650,000 $2,650,000 $2,000,000 $500,000 $1,000,000 $500,000 $4,500,000 $1,125,000 $2,250,000 $1,125,000 Proiected Proiect Timing (b) 7-20 years Depends On ODerationsSMART, 10- 20 years 10-20 years $4,000,000 $1,000,000 $2,000,000 $1,000,000 10-20 years $16,000,000-1 $7,000.0006-,$7,000,0006;-0 $2,000,000 Depends On Development Timing 2,000,000 000,000 00,000 ffundine source incorporates all amounts from previous program 311 $6,000,000 $1,500,000 $1,500,000 $3,000,000 10-20 years $2,000,000 $1,000,000 $1,000,000 Sub Total Other Projects $39,800,000 $14,775,000 $17,400,000 $7,625,000 Grand Total Project Cost $97,750,000 10-20 years (a) Priorities for circulation improvements are set in the Capital Improvements Program. This list may be amended as part of the five-year General Plan update. (b) The timing for the improvements depends on the size, type and phasing of additional development. Policies LU -2 (Development Timing) requires findings when project - related traffic will not cause the LOS to be exceeded. Source: San Rafael Public Works Department Amended 1/13/2016 C-7. Circulation Improvements Funding. Take a strong advocacy role in securing funding for planned circulation improvements. Continue to seek comprehensive funding that includes Federal, State, and County, ^„a ne�� funding, among other funding sources,- Local Traffic Mitigation Fees;-, and Assessment Districts. The local development projects' share of responsibility to fund improvements is based on: (1) the generation of additional traffic that creates the need for the improvement; (2) the improvement's role in the overall traffic network; (3) the probability of securing funding from alternative sources; and (4) the timing of the improvement. C -7a. Traffic Mitigation Fees. Continue to implement and periodically update the City's Traffic Mitigation Program. Responsibility: Public Works, Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time C -7b. Circulation Improvements. Seek funding for and construct circulation improvements needed for safety, to improve circulation, or to maintain traffic level of service. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Capital Improvements, Grants, CMA, MTC, State and Federal funding See LU -2a (Development Review). C-8. Eliminating and Shifting Peak Hour Trips. Support efforts to limit traffic congestion through eliminating low occupancy auto trips or shifting peak hour trips to off-peak hours. Possible means include telecommuting, walking and bicycling, flexible work schedules, car and vanpooling and other Transportation Demand Management approaches. See Programs C -13a (School Transportation) C-1 la (Car and Vanpooling), C -12a (Regional Support for TDM), C -12b (City Support for TDM) and C -12c (City TDM Program). C-9. Access for Emergency Services. Provide safe routes for emergency vehicle access so that that emergency services can be delivered when Highway 101 or 580 are closed or congested with traffic. C -9a. Highway Closures. Develop, and update as necessary, an emergency contingency plan that addresses highway closure events. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time C -9b. Roadway Monitoring. Support local traffic monitoring and control approaches, such as closed-circuit cameras and high-tech traffic signal systems that can be used to relieve congestion around incident sites or support emergency vehicle access. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time See S -32a (Safe Buildings) and S -36a (Emergency Connectors). Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CIRCULATION 177 Expanding Alternatives to the Single Occupant Automobile for Local and Regional Mobility The single occupant vehicle is the dominant form of travel in San Rafael and Marin County as a whole, aGGGunting fer 65.75 r, Rt of the average GGMFnuter Mede share. If congestion levels are to be kept at current or lower levels, the City, County and community as a whole need to do what they can to reduce trips and encourage use of alternatives to the single occupancy automobile. The County concludes in its 25 -Year Transportation Vision for Marin County that expanding transportation choice is the only realistic way to manage congestion and improve mobility. How can San Rafael's residents be inspired to reduce automobile trips and make more trips by alternative modes? • Land use changes that allow people to live closer to shops and places of work to promote walking, rather than driving, for daily needs. • Transportation Demand Management (TDM) programs create incentives for changing travel behavior, and can be administered on a mandatory or voluntary basis by employers. The box below provides a range of tools that could be used. Garr eel ng is already relatively ,GGeSSful in Ssn Rsf Ith s 12 p8FGeRt se,;,m-rine ,,.�deshare iR s- may net rseom sppr^r,r iate On 200 CQn P/afog! b t GO ild hon.,me, offartmwa tAA's in +ho f, it, iro • The Safe Routes to School program and related efforts are beginning to change school commute behavior in participating schools and should be actively supported. County and City studies have found that 21 percent of a.m. peak hour trips are due to school commute trips, and that 75 percent of students arrive at school by car. C-10. Alternative Transportation Mode Projects. Encourage and support projects, such as the Highway 101 High Occupancy Vehicle Gap Closure Project, that benefit alternatives to the single occupant automobile. C -10a. Advocating Alternative Mode Projects. Through the City's participation in the CMA and other regional transportation agencies, advocate for innovative and alternative transportation projects that will reduce single occupancy vehicle use. Responsibility: Public Works, Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time C-11. Alternative Transportation Mode Users. Encourage and promote individuals to use alternative modes of transportation, such as regional and local transit, carpooling, bicycling, walking and use of low -impact alternative vehicles. Support development of programs that provide incentives for individuals to choose alternative modes. C-lla. Car and Vanpooling. Support car and vanpooling in San Rafael through local and Ee gional programs that sues "RIDES for R.,, Area Geffimu4e -s" r which matches riders interested in carpooling or vanpooling. Responsibility: Public Works, Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time 178 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CIRCULATION Amended 1/13/2016 C -11b. Car Sharing. Support efforts to organize and run car -sharing programs in San Rafael. Responsibility: Public Works, Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time C -11c. Low -Impact Alternative Vehicles. Encourage the use of street -legal alternative vehicles that minimize impacts on the environment. Investigate new technology regarding electric vehicles and cleaner burning combustion vehicles. To support this program, encourage the development of alternative fuel infrastructure (for instance, electric plug -ins) in parking facilities and other key locations around the City as well as, when cost-effective, include electric, hybrid, or alternative fuel vehicles in the City fleet. Responsibility: Public Works, Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time C-lld. Bike to Work Day. Encourage City employees, other San Rafael workers and residents to participate in Bike to Work Days and similar programs and provide support services for the program. Responsibility: Public Works, Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time C -Ile. Reduction of Single Occupancy Vehicles. Encourage developers of new projects in San Rafael, including City projects, to provide improvements that reduce the use of single occupancy vehicles. These improvements could include preferential parking spaces for car pools, bicycle storage and parking facilities, and bus stop shelters. Responsibility: Community Development, Public Works Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Fees See H-151- M;-1— -ElenSity Infill NeusirrgNear Transit) and C -17a (SMART). T r an s p or t at i on D e m and Management Tools TDM programs are generally administered by large employers, both public and private. Groups of smaller employers can combine forces to offer program benefits. The following tools are designed to create incentives for using modes other than the single occupancy auto. Benefits include reduced congestion, parking needs, and emissions, and, potentially, healthier workers: Examples of TDM tools include: • Bicycling incentive programs, such as free bikes, secure parking, restrooms and showers. • Projects to improve the comfort and safety of pedestrians. • Telecommuting and flexible work hours. • Carpool/vanpool use incentives, such as ride - matching services, at -cost fuel, and priority parking. • Bus/rail use incentives, such as subsidies. • Express shuttles to connect workers with other commute modes and provide lunchtime service to activity centers. • Guaranteed Ride Home programs. • On-site cafeterias, child-care facilities, and concierge services for employees. • Promotion of pedal cab and bicycle delivery systems. • Low emission vehicle fleets with fueling or charging stations and preferential parking. • Public education, ridesharing and promotion information. • On-site employee housing to encourage walking to work. C-12. Transportation Demand Management. Work cooperatively with governmental agencies, non -profits, businesses, institutions and residential neighborhoods to create new and effective Transportation Demand Management (TDM) programs to minimize single occupancy automobile use and peak period traffic demand. C -12a. Regional Support for TDM. Support regional efforts to work with employers to provide TDM programs. Responsibility: Public Works, Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CIRCULATION 179 Resources: Staff Time C -12b. City Support for TDM. Serve as a resource to employers wishing to implement TDM by providing information through printed materials, workshops and other means. Encourage smaller employers to "pool" resources to create effective TDM programs. Responsibility: Public Works, Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time C -12c. City TDM Program. Identify cost-effective City of San Rafael TDM programs for City employees. Consider approaches taken by the County in its Employee Commute Alternative Program. Responsibility: Public Works, Community Development Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time, Grants C-13. School -Related Automobile Traffic. Actively encourage public and private schools to implement trip reduction programs and reduce congestion caused by commuting students and staff. C -13a. School Transportation. Actively support efforts to improve transportation options for students and reduce school -related traffic congestion. Examples include advocating for funding for the Safe Routes to Schools program, encouraging transit providers to offer free passes or awards to students to use transit, supporting increased funding of school buses and crossing guards, and staggering school hours. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time, Grants C -13b. TDM for Schools. Require TDM programs for new or expanded private schools. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees 180 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CIRCULATION Amended 1/13/2016 Exhibit 22 ' car mran it Mr61L iLaa San Rafael Roadways & Arterials Highway Major Arterial /N Minor Arterial n/ Rail Rightoi Way A.1 Marin County Congestion Management 'y Plan Roadway 0 500 1000 1500 Meters 1 Miles a - 1 °y °� � � M°e[ wvebrrd bipr 1 °` .� Imre aMlllarGeakad. Exhibit 23 y•M' Z Lucas s nmrramaew da oda- ey rr. . s n. FARE weakdarinps ppe�are ra Vroy� a ' "'°' Marinwood ZONE .aar....k. Valley s o q kr aa,iq w.a, mean area=,*e°n lacl^pereree to au�oum°v °°4 .. i RlelllO-wtlOkJay4Only-bvlween g qd Other Transit sv stems CFor'�mormanon, can snl d Ny! nd O°'W Merinwa°d Sr, YrrcenH B°e Ped Sen AnsalmPer,d lnverneae-a trilu 9 sell day. CaN 41 Y4540%4lpr detell6. °y/Py g .� M3� Q ; � r AC A[Translr PE Petaluma l7anslt - 51N°mN- % AE Airport Express lb°n°me ce.l PS P.xIl Snutt[e Pe (30 At Angel ll Tib... 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N", ; Gap o, ' g - r v ®I� m * transit hub and future Downtown ,Ne Sc semnerri = .n : quaemr p' 11e wnrN ` 4' d Oa MaM1 i .>°r mmmm _ .. 5 fail station Kernunne 0°Itns w.= �r9 t/. is He I °jb P'rN6t'brd AE GR MA SO K :" NenWIOOr�� ®vpunn9 Aeak periods, Rvmv® anmm�� Y•an 9° (r� �A v 1 4 Y R 58n 4eb S• e` J �-yr, epere,ea reverse Peak dlrecdpn -. between Ban AneelmO end Menor t+ RUSS re 2c Bey y0,� y Fpr peak dl—ll-adrvlce.r4ro THa1 'aa, 4`$olecaa ly a4 Fp ptr Source: Golden Gale Bus&Ferry Guide, Ra�ta�eched°ler. vaua t°a Rba d6 F o P sua4n narPe�ne a°O F` a Win10r2003-2004 melete niphlRWu©ttlp q° y g 6 �Emparcaar•^ Rd emWedria 31, Franca Drake Bfvd 4 O 9° MS i ° Sed d d' ,as.°ae..artoemin..inF.IH.a. � sea r,..rarenae r°raxNa � _ ..�.,. a. Mi _ \ Kentfield ori • Genal ,r� P ea 3 8 Greenbraes v Or ? � ad•g Gorden Get° s�c S m ID mev6 n Air Shd I na =y '� Merin C•n1eP p La""" a""4. ^o Se°.,+•° °irsPo Hpaplta7 lr"r■ vy o �'� wO R f S, M5� Y,pvlkh' ill Ovz r^°P�m en�bpe R,mwy Qa 0rva a`tTef Larkspur; « ell Improving Transit and Related Services Of all the alternative travel options, transit holds perhaps the greatest potential for expanding transportation options and increasing mobility in San Rafael and the county. San Rafael's low-density suburban development and dispersed travel pattern, however, provide significant challenges to transit planners. In addition a !aGk of potential of tr cit wntll (!'. rali-a4,lo and signifiGant sourro of transportatie. or„red The local transit Who P system is not currently competitive with the automobile in terms of convenience and accessibility. Land use policies that support transit use are essential in supporting and planning for transit use. Locating higher density mixed use development with housing along transit lines reduces the need for automobiles and encourages transit use. Working with surrounding communities and regional transportation planning and transit providers to plan for responsive transit services is also essential. Key transit service improvements needed include: • Ongoing dissemination of transit services information • Improved regional transit service to include expanded express bus and transbay basic bus service, new commuter rail service, and expanded ferry service and ferry feeder bus service. • Improved local transit service to include expanded local bus service and new shuttle service to connect with rail service, local employers and other destinations as feasible. • Two intermodal commuter hubs, centering on rail and bus service in Downtown and in North San Rafael. Transit hubs should provide a high level of passenger amenities, such as real-time transit information, safe and convenient pedestrian and bicycle access and secure bike parking. C-14. Transit Network. T r a n s i t L o c a l l y vides and P a r a t r a n s i t and Regional l y ? Golden Gate Bridge, Highway and Transportation District (GGBHTD) provides regional and local bus service, as well as ferry service from Larkspur to San Francisco. Marin County Transit District (MCTD) provides local bus service through a contract with GGBHTD. Water Transit Authority (WTA) was formed to plan expanded ferry service in the Bay Area. Sonoma Marin Area Rail Transit Authority (SMART) was formed in 2003 to plan and provide north/south commute rail service. Greyhound Bus provides national bus service. Marin and Sonoma Airporter provide bus and shuttle service to the Oakland and San Francisco Airports. Encourage the continued development of a safe, efficient, and reliable regional and local transit network to provide convenient alternatives to driving. C -14a. Transit Network. Support Countywide efforts to sustain and expand Marin County's transit network. Work with neighborhoods, employers, transit providers, transportation planning agencies and funding agencies to improve and expand regional transit to and from adjacent counties, increase local transit services, and provide responsive paratransit services. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time See also H -152-2a (14igheF Density Infill Near Transit). Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 /CIRCULATION 183 C-15. Transit Needs. Support efforts to track, understand and respond to changing transit and paratransit needs in order to meet the requirements of specific population groups including, but not limited to, elders, youth, persons with disabilities, persons with limited economic means, residents of specific neighborhoods, employers and visitors to the region. Advocate for meaningful public participation in meetings and discussions with transit providers, and ensure that the needs of those in the community who are transit - dependent are well represented. The Bettini Transportation Center is a multimodal transit hub with services connecting San Rafael to San Francisco, the East Bay, and the North Bay. C -15a. Transit Needs. Work with transit providers to identify underserved neighborhoods and population groups and advocate for expanded service in those areas and populations. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time C -15b. City Survey of Transit Needs. In City -sponsored surveys of residents, seek transit satisfaction levels when appropriate and feasible. Responsibility: Management Services, Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time C -15c. Transit for Tourism. Support efforts to provide and promote effective transit options for visitors to West Marin and other County tourist destinations, in order to reduce regional traffic flow through San Rafael. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time C-16. Transit Information. Encourage the development and dissemination of local and regional transit information to facilitate greater use of transit systems. This includes service, educational and promotional information. Support efforts to provide transit information in languages other than English as needed. C -16a. Transit Information Dissemination. Encourage development and distribution of transit information through printed materials, kiosks, web sites, radio and television broadcasts, and other means. Provide transit information on the City's website, at City offices open to the public and through other dissemination means. Include transit access information on City meeting notices and in notices for City -permitted events, and encourage merchants to provide transit information in their advertisements and in their places of business. Responsibility: Public Works, Community Development, City Manager, Library Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time C-17. Regional Transit Options. Encourage expansion of existing regional transit connecting Marin with adjacent counties, including basic service, express bus service, new commuter rail service, and ferry service. Regional Bus Service. Encourage expansion of regional bus service to and from Sonoma, San Francisco, Contra Costa and Alameda Counties. Support efforts to 184 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CIRCULATION Amended 1/13/2016 increase the frequency of service, and expand express bus service along the 101 corridor to connect with major employers. Commuter Rail: Encourage development and use of a viable commuter rail service through San Rafael operating on the Sonoma Marin Area Rail Transit (SMART) right- of-way. Though SMART service will initially have its southern termination point Downtown, encourage efforts to ultimately connect it with ferry service to San Francisco. Ferry Service: Support efforts to improve and expand ferry service, and provide efficient connections to the ferry via other transportation modes. Airporter Service: Support continued regional dedicated bus and shuttle service to and from the San Francisco and Oakland International Airports. Other Regional Transit: Support continued Greyhound Bus service and other similar services that may develop. C -17a. SMART. Support the following design features for SMART commuter service within San Rafael: 1. Establish stations in Downtown and in the Civic Center that will serve as multi -modal commuter transit hubs. 2. Design stations and rail crossings safe for pedestrians and with minimal impacts on roadway traffic. 3. Support crossings at -grade through Downtown and strongly advocate for trains that are of a length that they avoid blocking traffic at an intersection. 4. Ensure that new development adjacent to the rail line is set back a safe distance and adequately attenuates noise. 5. Encourage high-density transit -oriented development in the vicinity of the rail stations. 6. Include noise mitigation as described in policy N-9 (Sonoma Marin Area Rail Transit). 7. Provide a north/south bike/pedestrian path on or adjacent to the railroad right-of-way. Responsibility: Public Works, Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time C -17b. SMART Right -of -Way. Maintain the SMART riRht- of-wav for rail service. Encourage identification of alter -native and interim uses of the SMART D T r;g t of way pending development of rail ser iee. sh olild Ve oxo Plot ZT.�P.gv for- rail s€i=�4ee,aetivelyTiffsoe—alternative uses ine-lud Responsibility: Public Works, Community Development Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time C -17c. Ferry Terminals. Support creation of a ferry terminal at an environmentally appropriate location north of San Rafael, near Highway 37 and Petaluma River, offering service to San Francisco, in order to reduce regional commute traffic passing through Marin on Highway 101. In addition, support efforts to re -locate the Larkspur Landing Ferry Terminal to San Quentin in order to shorten the Ferry commute distance to San Francisco. Responsibility: Public Works, Community Development Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time The SMART rail line will run from San Rafael to Cloverdale, with plans for a connection to Larkspur Ferry Terminal as well. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CIRCULATION 185 See N-8 (Sonoma Marin Area Rail Transit). C-18. Local Transit Options. Support improvement and expansion of local transit options including local bus, shuttle and taxi services. a. Local Bus Service. Support efforts to improve bus routing, frequency and stop amenities to meet local needs. b. Local Shuttles. Support efforts to create shuttle services as they become feasible to serve specialized populations and areas of San Rafael. If rail service is developed, support shuttle service connections between rail stations and major employers. c. Other Local Transit. Support Dial -A -Ride and taxi services serving San Rafael. C -18a. Improved Bus Stops. Continue to support efforts to improve bus stops to provide a safe and convenient experience for riders. Allow commercial advertising to fund bus stop upgrades and maintenance. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time C -18b. Local Shuttle Program. Should there be an increase in density in a potential service area or implementation of the SMART rail line, and if funding becomes available, investigate the feasibility of a local shuttle program to serve San Rafael. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time C-19. Paratransit Options. Encourage expansion of paratransit services as needed to serve specialized populations including seniors and persons with disabilities. C -19a. Paratransit Service. Support continued Whistlestop Wheels service, and support expanded regional paratransit services where needed. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time C-20. Intermodal Transit Hubs. Support efforts to develop intermodal transit hubs in Downtown and at the Civic Center to provide convenient and safe connections and support for bus, rail, shuttle, bicycle, and pedestrian users, as well as automobile drivers using transit services. Hubs should include secure bicycle parking and efficient drop-off and pick-up areas without adversely affecting surrounding traffic flow. Reference the Downtown Station Area Plan and the Civic Center Station Area Plan, which address and present recommendations for transportation and access improvements to transit within a half mile radius of the two SMART stations. C -20a. Transit Hubs. Work with Marin County, the Marin County Transit District, SMART Commission, the Golden Gate Bridge Transportation District, and other regional agencies to ensure that intermodal transit hubs are designed to be convenient and safe for San Rafael users. Work with SMART on the design of the new rail stations and the transit center interaction with the rail service. Responsibility: Public Works, Community Development Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time 186 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CIRCULATION Amended 1/13/2016 See Exhibit 23 for information about transit routes and transit hubs. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CIRCULATION 187 GOAL 14: A SAFE AND EFFICIENT STREET SYSTEM It is the goal of San Rafael to have a safe and efficient street system that minimizes impacts on residential neighborhoods. Our local streets are safe and attractive, and our neighborhoods are protected from outside traffic impacts, such as commuter speeding, through our use of innovative traffic calming techniques. One key factor in protecting residential neighborhood quality of life is ensuring street safety. As congestion increases on our regional roadways, some commuters seek alternative routes through adjacent neighborhoods. In response, neighborhoods seek City assistance in reducing the impacts of increased traffic and speeds. Neighborhood traffic calming techniques seek to improve vehicular flow and safety by installing traffic control devices, increasing enforcement and promoting public awareness of traffic safety problems and potential solutions. Traffic control devices, such as revised speed limits, stop signs, speed humps, curb bulbs and roundabouts, have been used effectively in communities to reduce speeds and increase safety. The City Council has adopted a "Speed Hump Installation Policy" establishing specific criteria for street conditions warranting speed hump installation. The Council also has adopted a "Multi - Way Stop Installation Policy" establishing criteria for intersections warranting a multi - way stop. These policies provide guidance to the City Traffic Engineer in determining whether these control devices should be recommended. The City's Traffic Coordinating Committee evaluates community requests for such devices. Another key factor contributing to the quality of life of San Rafael's neighborhoods is street design. Street trees and other landscaping, small public spaces and public art can create attractive design themes unifying the appearance of a street. The Neighborhoods Element includes other neighborhood -specific policies pertaining to the safety and appearance of residential streets that supplement those presented below. 188 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CIRCULATION Amended 1/13/2016 C-21. Residential Traffic Calming. Protect residential areas from the effects of traffic from outside the neighborhood by continuing to evaluate and construct neighborhood traffic calming solutions as appropriate such as speed humps, bulb outs, speed limits, stop signs and roundabouts. Ensure that traffic calming approaches do not conflict with emergency response. C-21 a. Traffic Calming Program. Maintain a neighborhood traffic calming program under the direction of the City Traffic Engineer, and seek funding for its implementation. Ensure neighborhood participation in the development and evaluation of potential traffic calming solutions. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Contributions, Staff Time See also CD -9a (Corridor Design Guidelines). C-22. Attractive Roadway Design. Design roadway projects to be attractive and, where possible, to include trees, landscape buffer areas, public art, integration of public spaces and other visual enhancements. Emphasize tree planting and landscaping along all A Public Works crew installs a speed hump to slow neighborhood traffic. streets. C -22a. Native Plants Along Roadways. Continue to regularly remove non-native invasive plants along roadways, and to encourage attractive native plantings. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time See LU -2a (Development Review), CD - 9a (Corridor Design Guidelines), CD -9b (Right -of -Way Landscaping), I -8b (Street Trees for New Development). Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CIRCULATION 189 GOAL 15: CONNECTIONS BETWEEN NEIGHBORHOODS It is the goal of San Rafael to have convenient connections between neighborhoods. Our neighborhoods are conveniently and directly connected to one another and to activity centers. The daily life of our residents is enhanced because they are more easily able to reach workplaces, schools, shopping, and recreation areas by foot, bike or transit. San Rafael's topography, highways, and street layout have worked together over time to isolate some neighborhoods from others. Highway 101 contributes to this significantly by bisecting the city, east from west. Improved connections within and between neighborhoods are needed to increase mobility on foot, by bicycle and by transit. Examples of neighborhoods with poor connections between them that would benefit from future projects include the Canal Neighborhood with Montecito, Terra Linda with the Civic Center and Terra Linda with Downtown. In the recent past, better connections have been achieved in some areas through projects such as the Merrydale Overcrossing, the Lincoln/Los Ranchitos connector and the Andersen extension. A key opportunity for improving east -west connections within the city occurs when highway interchanges are improved. In addition, the 2002 Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan, briefly summarized in the next section, outlines specific routes that will contribute to better connecting neighborhoods within San Rafael and routes that will improve connections to surrounding communities. C-23. Connections Between Neighborhoods and with Adjoining Communities. Identify opportunities to improve pedestrian, bicycle and transit connections between San Rafael neighborhoods and between San Rafael and adjacent communities. C -23a. Better Signage. As opportunities arise, provide better signage, consistent with the Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan for bicycle, pedestrian and transit routes to identify pathways between neighborhoods and other communities. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Capital Improvement Program See also LU -2a (Development Review) and S -36a (Emergency Connectors). 190 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CIRCULATION Amended 1/13/2016 C-24. Connections Between Neighborhoods and Activity Centers. Seek opportunities to increase connectivity between San Rafael neighborhoods and activity centers. C -24a. North San Rafael Promenade. Support the creation of a promenade that connects the Terra Linda Shopping Center and Community Center to the Marin Civic Center as described in the North San Rafael Vision Promenade Conceptual Plan. Require sections to be built in conjunction with new development along the Promenade route. Work with community groups to seek funding for improvements in the public right-of-way, and for recreational facilities consistent with the Capital Improvements program. Responsibility: Community Development, Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time, Grants, Donations C -24b. Canal Crossing. Seek a pedestrian and bicycle crossing over the Canal to better link the Canal neighborhood with schools, shopping and other services. Responsibility: Public Works, Community Development Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Capital Improvement Program, Grants C -24c. Access between Downtown and Canal/Montecito Neighborhoods. Seek improved pedestrian and bicycle access from Downtown, under Highway 101, to the Montecito and Canal neighborhoods, particularly from the Transit Center to the Montecito Shopping Center and Grand Avenue. Responsibility: Public Works, Community Development Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Capital Improvement Program, Grants See N-83 (Canal Access), NH -92 (North San Rafael Promenade), NH -139 (Pedestrian and Bicycle Safety and Accessibility), NH -133 (Northgate Mall) and NH -161 (Terra Linda Shopping Center). C-25. Meeting Local Circulation Needs Around Highway Interchanges. Work with appropriate agencies to address local circulation needs for all modes when freeway improvements are planned and constructed. C -25a. Highway Bus Stops. As interchange improvement projects along Highway 101 and Interstate 580 are in the planning and construction stages, work closely with appropriate agencies and the community to identify ways to improve drop-off parking at bus stops and bicycle and pedestrian access over or under 101 and 580. Responsibility: Public Works, Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CIRCULATION 191 GOAL 16: BIKEWAYS It is the goal of San Rafael to have safe, convenient and attractive bikeways and amenities. Bicycling has become an integral part of daily life for many San Rafael citizens. The city features an extensive bikeway system, nested within the larger countywide system, which connects riders with neighborhoods, activity centers, transit stops and surrounding communities. Bicycling is well supported by visible route signage, extensive bike parking, convenient transit connections, and public education programs promoting biking and bike safety. The City Council adopted the San Rafael Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan in 2002. As one of its primary goals, the Plan strives to make San Rafael a model community for alternative transportation, aiming for a 20 percent mode share of all utilitarian trips to be made by bike or on foot in the year 2020. The Plan strives to make the bicycle an integral part of daily life in San Rafael, particularly for trips of less than five miles, by implementing and maintaining a bikeway network, providing end -of -trip facilities, improving bicycle/transit integration, encouraging bicycle use, and making bicycling safer. San Rafael Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan The Plan proposes a number of new bicycle connections, including both north -south and east -west routes and including routes that connect San Rafael with other communities. It also promotes safe biking to schools, educational programs, considering bikeway improvements when planning all transportation projects, routine maintenance of bikeway facilities, upgraded and expanded bicycle parking facilities and other support facilities such as showers and restrooms. Finally, it recommends seeking funding through regional, State, and Federal programs, and coordinating with other jurisdictions when seeking funding. The "Bike/Ped Plan" identifies short- term priority projects (1 — 5 years), medium-term projects (1 — 10 years), and long-term projects (1 — 20 years). Example projects include a north/south connector along the SMART rail line (as feasible), a north/south connector to Larkspur through the Larkspur tunnel, sidewalk gaps and the Bay Trail, an overcrossing from the Canal to the west side of Highway 101 and a bridge from the Canal to Montecito. The County adopted the Marin County Unincorporated Area Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan in 2000. The County's Plan also promotes increasing the mode share of bicycle and pedestrian trips to 20 percent by 2020. C-26. Bicycle Plan Implementation. Make bicycling and walking an integral part of daily life in San Rafael by implementing the San Rafael's Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan. C -26a Implementation. Implement provisions of the Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan in conjunction with planned roadway improvements or through development or redevelopment of properties fronting on the proposed routes. Responsibility: Public Works, Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing 192 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CIRCULATION Amended 1/13/2016 Funding: Staff time, Capital Improvement Program C -26b. Funding. Seek grant Funding for implementation of segments of the Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Funding: Staff time Downtown bicycle patrols are an effective part of San Rafael's police services C -26c. Bicycle Parking. Update Zoning Ordinance requirements for bicycle parking. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Short term Funding: Staff time See LU -2a (Development Review). Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CIRCULATION 193 GOAL 17: PEDESTRIAN PATHS It is the goal of San Rafael to have safe, convenient and pleasurable pedestrian paths and amenities. Walking to reach local shopping, transit stops and other nearby destinations has become a part of daily life for many San Rafael residents and workers. Pedestrians are well served by an extensive network of convenient and well- maintained sidewalks and other pathways throughout the city. Walking is also a popular form of recreation, as users enjoy the Bay Trail and other urban trails through open spaces and neighborhoods. One of the top goals of the San Rafael Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan is to encourage walking as a daily form of transportation in San Rafael by completing a pedestrian network that accommodates short trips and transit, improves the quality of the pedestrian environment, and increases pedestrian safety and convenience. An additional goal, as noted in the previous section, is to increase the mode share to 20 percent for utilitarian trips made via walking and biking by 2020. Expanding and improving the pedestrian network will help better connect neighborhoods with the larger community. The Plan proposes and prioritizes a set of projects to make sidewalks and pathways safer and to expand the existing pedestrian network. The Plan also proposes completing missing connections to establish direct routes for walking, making walking to schools safer, ensuring improved accessibility to pedestrian facilities for the elderly and disabled, routine maintenance, and supporting installation of appropriate pedestrian facilities in new transportation improvements, development projects and transit facilities. In addition, the Plan recommends seeking funding for ongoing maintenance of sidewalks and pathways and ADA curb cuts. C-27. Pedestrian Plan Implementation. Promote walking as the transportation mode of choice for short trips by implementing the pedestrian element of the City's Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan. In addition to policies and programs outlined in the Bicycle and Pedestrian Plan, provide support for the following programs: C -27a. Implementation. Monitor progress in implementing the pedestrian -related goals and objectives of the Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan on an annual basis. Responsibility: Public Works, Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Grants C -27b. Prioritizing Pedestrian Improvements. Develop a program for prioritizing the maintenance of existing pedestrian facilities based on pedestrian use and connectivity as well as maintenance need, and secure funding sources for its implementation. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time C -27c. Bay Trail. Support efforts and seek funding to complete the Bay Trail System. Responsibility: Public Works, Community Services Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Grants, Staff Time, Capital Improvement Program 194 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CIRCULATION Amended 1/13/2016 C -27d. Pedestrian Safety Enforcement. Continue enforcement of traffic and parking laws that protect the pedestrian right of way on local streets (e.g., no parking on sidewalks or pathways, and crosswalk violations). Responsibility: Police, Management Services Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time C -27e. Pedestrian Safety. Consider new projects and programs to increase pedestrian safety. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Capital Improvements, Grants C -27f. Disabled Access. Continue efforts to improve access for those with disabilities by complying with Federal and State requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Seek to incorporate ADA improvements into street and sidewalk projects. Develop a program identifying street barriers to pedestrian access, and prioritize curb cut and ramp improvements. Responsibility: Public Works, City Manager Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Capital Improvement Program, Grants See also LU -2a (Development Review) and I -6c (Sidewalk Repair). C-28. Urban Trail Network. Encourage identification, renovation and maintenance of an urban trails network throughout San Rafael to encourage walking and appreciation of historical and new pathways. C -28a. Urban Trail Network Project. Prepare a plan to include a map and descriptions of existing and potential urban trails in San Rafael. Urban trails to be identified include, but are not limited to, historic neighborhood stairways and walkways, Downtown alleyways, park pathways, and creekside paths. The document should identify a network of connecting pathways that can be promoted for walking enjoyment, and means to preserve and maintain these paths. Responsibility: Public Works, Community Development Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Grants Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CIRCULATION 195 GOAL 18: ADEQUATE PARKING It is the goal of San Rafael to provide parking that is adequate and accessible, with attention to good design. San Rafael uses innovative approaches to providing adequate parking. Our mix of accessible on and off-street parking is responsive to the unique needs of commercial areas, such as Downtown. In residential neighborhoods where there is a high demand for parking, the City works cooperatively to minimize impacts on residents and resolve conflicts between users. In some areas, preferential parking spaces are provided to carpool vehicles, low -impact electric vehicles, bicycles and other alternative modes of transportation to encourage their use. San Rafael's parking needs vary by area. The highest demand for parking occurs in the Downtown area, where development is most dense. A Downtown Parking Assessment District was formed in 1958 to better provide parking for the area. The current Parking District configuration roughly encompasses the area between Lincoln Avenue, D Street, Second Street, and Fifth Avenue. Other commercial areas experiencing high parking demand, such as the Montecito shopping area, may have parking shortages during peak shopping hours. Downtown in particular requires innovative parking strategies and calls for an urban parking strategy based on multi-purpose trips, availability of transit and shared parking, while In n o v a t i v e Parking other areas call for a required on-site M a n a g e m e n t S t r a t e g i parking approach. Several residential areas of San Rafael experience high parking demand and resulting conflicts. The City's Traffic Coordinating Committee meets regularly to discuss and resolve residential parking issues as well as other circulation issues. The Neighborhoods Element includes other specific policies pertaining to parking in residential areas that supplement those presented below. es Shared Parking: Parking spaces for more than one use. Tandem Parking: Two or more parking spaces, sharing the same access. Stacked Parking: Vertical parking, where car(s) are stored above the ground floor with a mechanical system. Parking to serve transit users of local and express buses, as well as future rail service may be provided through park and ride lots and shared parking. This need must be balanced with the desire to discourage parking in some areas in order to encourage greater transit use. Parking should be provided not only for automobiles but also for bicycles and other low -impact vehicles. Providing preferential parking for alternative modes encourages their use. C-29. Better Use of Parking Resources. Improve use of existing parking and create new parking opportunities through innovative programs, public/private partnerships and cooperation, and land use policies. 196 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CIRCULATION Amended 1/13/2016 C -29a. Shared Parking. Promote shared off-street parking arrangements to serve private and public users. For example, consider shared parking in mixed-use developments or encourage private office parking lots to make spaces available for nighttime public use. Responsibility: Management Services, Public Works, Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Parking Services Fund, Fees C -29c. Innovative Off -Street Parking. Where feasible, allow off-street parking through stackable and automated parking systems. Responsibility: Management Services, Public Works, Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Parking Services Fund, Fees C -29d. Parking Districts. Consider formation of new parking districts where warranted and feasible. Responsibility: Management Services, Public Works, Economic Development Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time, Parking Services Fund C -29e. Parking Meters. Evaluate the feasibility of expanding parking metering in business areas throughout the City. Responsibility: Management Services, Public Works, Economic Development. Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Parking Services Fund See also H-154-4 (Infill Near TransitRe s to Par -k ng Standar- ) 2005.---- -,-- -- C-30. Downtown Parking. Optimize the use of parking spaces Downtown. C -30a. Downtown Parking District. Conduct periodic evaluations and, consistent with State Law, modify the Downtown parking regulations to meet changing needs and to optimize parking Downtown. Responsibility: Economic Development, Management Services, Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Parking Services Fund, Assessment District C-31. Residential Area Parking. Evaluate effective means to manage residential parking to minimize the impacts of excess demand. See NH -8a (Restore Parking Spaces), NH -8b (Additional On -Site Parking), NH -8c (Permit Parking) and NH -8d (Zoning Ordinance Review). Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CIRCULATION 197 C-32. Parking for Alternative Modes of Transportation. Use preferential parking as an incentive to encourage alternative modes of transportation. C -32a. Preferential Parking. Consider zoning amendments to encourage the use of preferential parking for alternative vehicles such as carpools, low -emission vehicles, and bicycles in parking -impacted business areas. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time C-33. Park and Ride Lots. Support regional efforts to fund and construct commuter parking along transit routes, near commuter bus pads, and possibly near inter -modal commuter hubs in order to support use of transit. Parking areas should include secure parking for carpools, bicycles and other alternative modes and minimize neighborhood impacts. C -33b. Commuter Parking. Further evaluate provision of additional commuter parking near intermodal transit hubs in Downtown and in the Civic Center area to determine the effects of the additional parking on increasing transit ridership. Responsibility: Public Works, Management Services Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time See also C -29a (Shared Parking). 198 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CIRCULATION Amended 1/13/2016 Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 /CIRCULATION 199 Infrastructure Introduction The Infrastructure Element addresses the planning, provision and maintenance of public buildings, landscaping, roads, drainage, telecommunications, water and power systems, and other facilities in the City of San Rafael. The prosperity of San Rafael is in part founded upon an adequately sized and well-maintained infrastructure. The City of San Rafael is committed to maintaining and modernizing the City's facilities through ongoing planning and investment. The City will also continue to address issues such as functional and technological adequacy, accessibility for the disabled, and changing needs of San Rafael residents. An adequate and well-planned system of infrastructure facilities is one of the primary prerequisites for a city's development. The planning, construction and management of complex infrastructure facilities and networks is essential to the well-being of the City. San Rafael owns and maintains many buildings that house its public safety and administrative activities. The City also owns and operates a variety of facilities and buildings to meet the recreational and cultural needs of its residents. In addition, San Rafael is responsible for maintaining and managing facilities located in the public right-of-way, including street surfaces, signals, curbs, gutters, sidewalks, street trees, landscape medians and entryways, signs, and streetlights. Construction of new facilities and maintenance of existing facilities are managed through the City's Capital Improvements Program (CIP). The CIP is a major element of the City's budget, and includes projects that have been evaluated and prioritized through the City's interdepartmental review process. The CIP lists expected new facilities as well as facility improvements and repairs: the list includes fully funded projects as well as projects where funding is not yet available. As part of the City's budget, the CIP is updated on a bi-annual basis. The list of CIP projects identifies funding priorities. These priorities change in response to the amount of funds available. Sources of funding include the City's General Fund, Gas Tax Fund, Storm Water Fund, Redevelopment AnonGy, State and regional grants, and QQ private donations. For fiSGal , r �nnn_g1, San Rafael had expendit roc of *E'2 million for 63 ✓apital improvement projects. Through evaluation of facilities, regular maintenance, and planning for additional facilities to meet community needs, San Rafael is committed to having the best infrastructure the community can afford. For example, the City's building condition surveys identify seismic -safety and maintenance needs for public safety-related facilities. While periodic State budget issues affected the City's ability to adequately fund facility maintenance, the long-term goal of the City is to have an infrastructure to match the community's needs, and to establish a disciplined funding program for regular maintenance of these public facilities. Our Foundation Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / INFRASTRUCTURE 197 GOAL 19: SOUND INFRASTRUCTURE It is the goal of San Rafael to have well planned, well—maintained and adequate infrastructure, public buildings, and landscaping. In order to ensure the quality of infrastructure expected by the San Rafael community, public buildings, streets and sidewalks, landscape medians, and storm drains receive rehabilitation or replacement as needed, as well as continued maintenance. Prudent management and planning of resources is designed to allocate sufficient money to fund the construction and maintenance required. 1-1. Capital Improvements Maintenance and Replacement. Provide for ongoing, preventative maintenance of infrastructure facilities and timely replacement of City equipment. I -la. Capital Improvement Programming. Plan for the improvement of public facilities and infrastructure through maintenance of a multi-year capital improvement program. Responsibility: Public Works, Management Services, Economic Development, Community Services Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Capital Improvement Program Capital I m p r o v e m e n t P r o g r a m ( C I P) The multiyear scheduling of public physical improvements. The scheduling is based on studies of fiscal resources available and the choice of specific improvements to be constructed for a period of five to six years into the future. The purposes of the CIP are: • Identify present and future needs for physical improvements in the City. • Identify the potential costs of requested improvements. • Identify possible sources of revenue to pay for the requested improvements. • Provide the City Council a procedure for setting priorities among requested improvements. • Promote coordination of construction programs among public agencies and private interests. • Provide an effective tool for implementing the General Plan. The CIP is included in the City of San Rafael Program Budget, available in the Public Library and the City Clerk's Office. I -lb. Public Input. Continue to improve public input into the City's CIP process. Consider ways to utilize the City's website to list funded or proposed capital improvements. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time I -lc. "Sinking Fund." Establish a `sinking' fund to finance maintenance of the City's infrastructure. Responsibility: Management Services, Public Works Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time, (charges to departments), Tax, General Fund, Assessment District 1-2. Adequacy of City Infrastructure and Services. Assure that development can be adequately served by the City's infrastructure and that new facilities are well planned and well designed. I -2a. Long-term needs. Continue to use the CIP as a tool to conduct comprehensive analyses of long-term infrastructure needs, including new facilities and maintenance. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time 198 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / INFRASTRUCTURE Amended 1/13/2016 I -2b. Diversified Funding. Seek diversificd funding sources in addition to the City's various funds. Responsibility: All Departments Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: State and Federal Funds, Grants, S i n k i n g F u n d Partnerships, Mitigation Fees, Partnerships. See also LU -2a (Development Review 1-3. Availability of Utilities. Promote the availability of reliable and reasonably priced utilities necessary for businesses and residences to prosper. A sinking fund is a fund set up to put money aside for a future project. It is used to accumulate resources (annual additions and earnings) needed to retire the long-term bond issues at maturity. I -3a. Capacity Management. Work with the Central Marin Sanitation Agency and San Rafael Sanitation District to ensure completion of a Capacity Management Alternative Study to determine the scope of needed improvements, costs, and expected benefits to avoid excess of water treatment capacity. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time I -3b. Water Supply Impacts. Work with Marin Municipal Water District to meet the projected water demand and to ensure reduction of existing and projected water supply impacts. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time See LU -2a (Development Review). 1-4. Utility Undergrounding. Continue to pursue the undergrounding of overhead utility lines. I -4a. Funding Undergrounding Utilities. Seek funding opportunities to underground utilities. Sources include PG&E's dedicated underground funding ("Rule 20A/20B"), private funding, and assessment districts. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time, Assessment District I -4b. Prioritizing Undergrounding Utilities. Consider prioritization of utility undergrounding along corridor or gateways identified in Exhibits 17 (San Rafael Community Design) and Exhibit 18 (Central San Rafael Community Design). Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Utility Funds, Redevelopment I -4c. Neighborhood Efforts. Provide information about funding options for undergrounding utilities. Assist neighborhoods with self-help efforts to fund undergrounding of utility lines. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Assessment District Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / INFRASTRUCTURE 199 1-5. Public Involvement. To the extent appropriate, continue to encourage public participation in the conceptual design and funding of major City building projects, such as public buildings and landscaping. I -5a. Design Review. Involve the community in the planning and design of major public facilities. As public improvements, City projects are subject to the appropriate level of design review. Responsibility: Public Works, Community Development, Community Services Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time, Capital Improvements Program Street Maintenance and Landscaping The City is responsible for maintaining 331 lane miles of street surfaces, 42 miles of landscaped street medians, and 50,000 street trees. These responsibilities include repairs, right-of-way, and streetlights. In order to prioritize and schedule street maintenance, the City uses a Pavement Management System for a more cost-efficient way of maximizing resources. In addition to the 'hardscape', San Rafael maintains landscaping, including, for example, the medians along Andersen Drive and Freitas Parkway, and the entryways in Downtown and in North San Rafael The City's street trees are a valuable resource that add character to neighborhoods and commercial areas, control temperatures and reduce air pollution. 1-6. Street Maintenance. Maintain and modify where appropriate existing levels of street and sidewalk repair, street sweeping, and street lighting. I -6a. Pavement Management. Continue the Pavement Management Program to allocate funds and prioritize street resurfacing projects. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Gas Tax I -6b. Street Sweeping. Continue to maintain a program for adequate street sweeping. Work with neighborhoods on ways to improve the efficiency of street sweeping, and to publicize street sweeping programs. Investigate alternative funding sources for street sweeping. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time I -6c. Sidewalk Repair. Develop a sidewalk repair program consistent with applicable State law and as local conditions warrant. Responsibility: Public Works, City Attorney Timeframe: Short Term Funding: Staff Time I -6d. Street Lighting Program. Continue the Street Lighting Program to allocate funds and plan for needed street lights and repairs. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Joint Powers Agreement, Staff Time See C -27b (Prioritizing Pedestrian Improvements). 200 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / INFRASTRUCTURE Amended 1/13/2016 1-7. Landscape Maintenance. Provide for low maintenance entryway landscaping. Give priority to maintenance of landscaping along the City's most heavily traveled roadways and gateways as shown on Exhibits 17 (San Rafael Community Design) and Exhibit 18 (Central San Rafael Community Design). I -7a. City Landscaping. Encourage partnerships with neighborhood and civic organizations to maintain and improve the City's landscaped areas. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time, Donations, Volunteers See CD -8a (Gateways) and I -8c (Street Tree Maintenance). 1-8. Street Trees. Create street tree planting and maintenance programs and encourage the use of large canopy trees where appropriate in order to control temperature, improve air quality, control wind, define neighborhoods, and improve street appearance. I -8a Street Tree Program. Develop a comprehensive citywide street tree planting, maintenance, replacement, diversification, wood utilization and tree waste -recycling program. The citywide street tree program should consider the use of large canopy trees where the planting areas and locations make such trees feasible and appropriate. Include coordination and communication with PG&E regarding tree maintenance in relation to power lines. Utilize volunteers to the extent feasible in creating a street tree inventory. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time, Partnerships, Grants, Volunteers I -8b. Street Trees for New Development. Require street trees at frequent spacing in all new developments and property upgrades, and consider mitigation for tree removal by planting street trees in locations other than the project site. Continue re_Dlacine trees that have aeeressive root systems affectine vehicular and pedestrian travel. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Contributions I -8c. Street Tree Maintenance. Seek diversified funding sources for street tree maintenance and replacement. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time I -8d. Landscape Maintenance Next to Sidewalks. Revise City ordinances to require maintenance of private landscaping which encroaches onto the City right-of-way and sidewalks. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time See I -6c (Sidewalk Repair). Street trees add to the beauty and character of neighborhoods. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / INFRASTRUCTURE 201 Water and Wastewater Infrastructure Marin Municipal Water District, a public utility governed by an elected Board, provides water service generally to all eastern Marin cities south of Novato. District facilities include six area reservoirs, two water treatment plants, storage tanks, pumps and lines. The primary source of water for the District is rainfall stored in area reservoirs. The District also maintains a line inter -tie with the North Marin Water District for Russian River water. Area rainfall water sources are limited by water reservoir storage capacity. The total current capacity of the Water District is approximately 80,000 acre- feet. Seventy-fwefive percent of the water used within the District is from local reservoirs, while the other twenty-&ixfive percent comes from the Russian River in Sonoma County. Two nor^on+ is from re GyGled water. Usage of potable and recycled water within the MMWD was an average of 27,560 in 2001 _02 totaled 31,338 acre-feet annualv for the vears 2004 to 2014. The watershed is currently managed for an operational yield of 28,5002500 acre-feet per year, resulting in a GUrreRt ,.,afar 3Npply defiGit of 1 650 aGre This .dofiGit is prejeGted to iacrease to ,900 aGre feet per by 2020. - The growth PFGjeGted ithin V\3 SCR Rafael planning area through 2020 is IQc/i V% _\1 Y Vt vtill' JR4 In rr kng iits pre}estisr�S—MMWD has two -contracts for water from the Russian River�ld' `9 pro„ide up to 14,200 anro_feet of wafer p to meet shortfalls in supply. However, use of additional Russian River water is limited by pipeline capacity and environmental concerns. To respond to the -anticipated supply deficits, MMWD is continuing its efforts to increase water conservation, is exploring additional opportunities to partner on water recycling with the Las Gallinas Valley Sanitary District and is designing and evaluating a possible desalination plant to increase supply. Wastewater treatment in the part of San Rafael south of Puerto Suello is handled by two entities: Central Marin Sanitation Agency and the San Rafael Sanitation District. The Central Marin Sanitation Agency serves the southern half of San Rafael and the Ross Valley, which includes essentially all of Corte Madera, Larkspur, Greenbrae, San Anselmo and Fairfax. The Agency owns and operates the sewage treatment plant, which provides modified secondary treatment, a deep -water sewer outfall line, and three transport lines from San Rafael, Larkspur and San Quentin. The San Rafael Sanitation District covers the portion of San Rafael south of Puerto Suello hill to the southerly city limit and adjacent unincorporated neighborhoods. The District owns and operates 32 pump stations and nine miles of force mains. Of the pump stations, 12 are considered to be major with sizeable tributary service areas, and 20 are minor. The District owns and maintains all of the 124 miles of gravity flow sewer mains in the District, although there are also some private sewer mains. Sewer laterals (lines between the sewer main and individual homes) are the responsibility of property owners. The Las Gallinas Valley Sanitary District provides sewage collection and treatment in San Rafael north of Puerto Suello Hill and in adjacent unincorporated areas. The District serves all northern City areas, and the unincorporated neighborhoods of Lucas Valley, Marinwood, and Santa Venetia. The District provides all treatment and transport facilities, which include the treatment plant, about 300 acres of ponds and 202 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / INFRASTRUCTURE Amended 1/13/2016 land irrigation areas, pump stations, force mains and gravity flow sewer mains. Sewer laterals are privately owned. Wastewater from the Las Gallinas Valley Sanitary District is given additional treatment by Marin Municipal Water District (MMWD) and piped through a circulation system separate from that of potable water to irrigate parks and landscaping throughout North San Rafael. The CMSD has a dry weather treatment capacity of 10 million gallons per day (mgd), and current flows of 8 mgd. The plant's wet weather capacity is between 90 and 125 mgd, depending on tidal conditions. Current wet weather flows vary with storm events, with a maximum flow reaching 107 mgd in recent years. Projected development through 2020 would increase wastewater flows by about 12 percent, or by 1 mgd during dry weather and 13 mgd during wet weather. Both increases are within the plant's current capacity, but the CMSA is currently studying ways to reduce wet weather flows and/or increase treatment capacity. The LGVSD has a dry weather capacity of 2.92 mgd and flows currently are measured at 2.2 mgd. The district has capacity for the equivalent of 4,500 additional dwelling units, which is well within projected growth. In additi„n the rnicn RAaFd ,s do" S cn impr9vemeRt program to in rea6e nananity to 3.5 mgd See the Air and Water Quality Element for policies and programs related to the City's stormwater infrastructure. 1-9. Water Supplies. Encourage Marin Municipal Water District to develop cost effective strategies for adequate long-term water supplies. 1-9a. Water Supplies. Monitor efforts by the MMWD to expand the local water supply to meet long-term needs. In addition to environmental review, request adequate review of economic impacts. Ensure adequate review of environmental, design and economic issues related to a potential desalination plant. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time 1-10. Sewer Facilities. Existing and future development needs should be coordinated with responsible districts and agencies to assure that facility expansion and/or improvement meets Federal and State standards and occurs in a timely fashion. I -10a. Coordination of Services. Participate in coordination efforts between responsible agencies providing sewer facilities. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time See also LU -2a (Development Review). Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / INFRASTRUCTURE 203 1-11. Improvements to Drainage Facilities. Continue to monitor and pursue as appropriate improvements to areas with insufficient drainage. 1-11 a. Pipe Replacement. Pursue the replacement of the City's older corrugated metal drainage pipe system with a more durable material. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees (Clean Water Fund) I -11b. Silt Removal. Continue to remove accumulated silts from city maintained drainageways and ponds. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees (Clean Water Fund), Staff Time, Assessment District See CON -6a (Municipal Code Compliance) and CON -8b (Tree Retention). 1-11 c. Mahon Creek. Develop a Creek Management Plan for the periodic dredging and maintenance of Mahon Creek from B Street to Highway 101. Continue the implementation of the Master Plan for Proposed Drainage Improvements within the San Rafael Basin, Final Implementation Plan as funding becomes available. Explore other feasible and cost- effective solutions to minimize or divert drainage to reduce periodic flooding on Mahon Creek. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time See 5-18 (Storm Drainage Improvements and S -19a (Incremental Flood Control Improvements). 1-12. Cost Effective Services. (Deleted) W,,,rt11i' stat of set=viee possible. I -12a. Consolidation of Services. (Deleted) Support legislation to encourage consolidation of multiple jurisdictions in the San al R-j5V=N,Nl ,i City Manage-r- T�mzffafaei Resaufees� Staff Time 1-13. Wastewater Treatment and Reuse. Encourage additional water recycling at Las Gallinas Valley Sanitary District and encourage the Central Marin Sanitation Agency to investigate recycling and reuse of its treated wastewater. See SU-5erON 20b. (Water Recycling). 204 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / INFRASTRUCTURE Amended 1/13/2016 Telecommunications Telecommunications are undergoing rapid technological changes. Through assessment of information technoloqv needs and available resources, the Citv seeks to remain current with the demands for effective, reliable telecommunication infrastructure. in 2003 SBC is the largest n . ider of feler,.,MM niGatiens seFViGes Can Rofa-_�-a- d i9 rospgn&b1e-f3r msintlning the nhySinol infraStFIJGt Uro for delivering IGGal nhGRe and intornot o s to r sideRtS 4Joweyer . nefit'GR fnr In. of teler,OMmuniGatiens seFViGeS within the City y is effered h.,� nNmbor ofASa-gc nig PuUis utalffitffies on_norfified nmm��nioc The-G*Gf Sun Rafael's five-year Infnrm_tinn Tonhnelogy Plan guides invocfmonf in the CifiJc harrhniore and seftware 1-14. City Technology. Invest in upgrading the City's technology infrastructure and improving public access to City services. I -14a. Technology Improvements. Implement and update the City's Information Technology Plan. Responsibility: Management Services (Information Services Committee) Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time, Grants, Fees 1-15. Telecommunication Improvements. Ensure that residents, schools, businesses and organizations have access to reliable, modern and cost-effective telecommunications. I -15a. Marin Telecommunications Agency. Coordinate with the County to upgrade telecommunications infrastructure in accordance with the Marin Telecommunications Agency or any successor agency. Responsibility: Management Services, Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time See S -29a (Involvement with Marin Emergency Radio Authority). I -15b. Telecommunication Ordinance. (Deleted) Adopt oommxn:,Qat4ens Ordinance regulating the appropriate placement and design of new telecommunicati facilities. Responsibility: AI�agjwnxnt Resoufees: Staff Time Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / INFRASTRUCTURE 205 Governance Introduction The City of San Rafael's government embraces its role of serving residents, preserving traditions, and fostering innovation through steady, focused leadership. Elected officials understand and value the trust and confidence of residents, built through ongoing dialogue. A motivated professional city staff is dedicated to continuous improvement in the quality of services. Elected officials and staff rely on citizen participation to assist in establishing reasonable and effective programs. Community-based local government engages residents, businesses, and other stakeholders in maintaining a network of diverse and distinct neighborhoods. Public engagement allows people to share information and concerns, and to address and pursue common interests. Good government requires active and effective leaders to make wise decisions in the resolution of local and regional issues, and to make government an energizer of civic action in the furtherance of social and economic common good. Serving a complex and diverse city, San Rafael government: • Strives for wide public policy participation; • Uses local commissions, boards and other groups to provide informed recommendations for balanced decision-making; and • Explains the reasons for decisions as they are reached. Our Foundation Community -Based Governance Community-based local government acts as a catalyst in mobilizing neighborhoods, shifting • From bureaucracy, authority and power to community self-determination, mutual responsibility and accountability; • From treating residents as clients to treating residents as active citizens; • From top down to bottom up; • From outside in to inside out; • From service collaboration to community collaboration; • From betterment to empowerment; • From imposing to growing. A community-based San Rafael government engages residents and other stakeholders in the direction, changes, decisions, priorities, planning, organizing, implementation and evaluation of the collaborative development of a sustainable network of diverse, distinct neiqhborhoods. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / GOVERNANCE 207 GOAL 20: DIVERSITY It is the goal of San Rafael to have a community of people diverse in age, ethnicity, culture, and income levels. San Rafael welcomes a wide variety ofpeople and ideas. This is one of San Rafael's strengths, which is important to sustain. The City of San Rafael is committed to successfully working within its diverse community. Through an economy providing jobs with a mix of incomes, and a variety of neighborhoods offering a range of housing types, San Rafael enjoys a community rich in people from different backgrounds and cultures. The City works to the greatest extent possible so that every resident can have a positive experience within San Rafael's community and benefit from an enhanced quality of life. G-1. Jobs and Diversity. Encourage the creation and retention of a wide variety of job opportunities at a mix of economic levels. See EV -8a (Industrial Zoning). G-2. Variety of Housing. Encourage the creation and retention of a wide variety of housing types serving people of all economic levels. See H -70-W (Retention of Mobilehomes and Preservation of Mobilehome Sites). H-1 Oc (Sinsle Room Occupancv (SRO) Units. H-IOd44b (Zoning for Live/Work Opportunities), 14 Ae (Single Room - Jooupamy SRO-UpAts),14'� 1&19a (I oliuoionar;Housing Nex�s 5qd ,, H -14c2 -3-a (Continue to Implement Zoning ProvisionsStandards to Encourage Mixed Use), H -16a2- a (New Second Units), H -18a (Inclusionary Housing Nexus Studv), and LU -23a (Zoning Ordinance Amendments). G-3. Housing Agencies. Support agencies and organizations that provide shelter, housing, and related services to very low-, low-, and moderate -income households. See H-4a6a (Inter -Jurisdictional Housing Activities and Resources), H-1 Ia4Sa (Homesharing and Tenant Matching Opportunities), H - 12a4 -6a (Countywide Efforts to Address Homeless Needs). G-4. Diversity at City Hall. Make efforts to reflect on Boards and Commissions, and among City employees the characteristics of San Rafael's population. G -4a. Outreach. Monitor the diversity of membership on City Boards and Commissions. Solicit applications from all segments of the community when making appointments. Responsibility: City Clerk San Rafael City Timeframe: Ongoing Hall was built in Resources: Staff Time 1966. G -4b. City Employment. Promote City employment opportunities throughout the community. Responsibility: Human Resources 208 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / GOVERNANCE Amended 1/13/2016 Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time GOAL 21: COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION It is the goal of San Rafael to have enthusiastic participation in civic life by residents and neighborhood organizations representing all ages and segments of the community. Active, broad-based public participation in developing community policy is needed and encouraged. We need successful partnerships among the City and neighborhoods, businesses, schools, and social and cultural service organizations so that there is a strong community -wide commitment to improvements. Public participation is at the core of successful city government. San Rafael's participatory program of education, input, dialogue and consensus -building is one of the key strategies for enhancing our entire community, creating a greater sense of community, and developing a commitment to the greater good. The recentiv approved Communitv Enqaqement Action Plan, approved in 2013, lays out a number of actions to improve public communication, outreach, transoarencv, and open qovernment. In addition, the Citv has worked in the improvement of technoloav to expand public access to information, includina online availabilitv of public meetina aaendas and video archive of meetinas as well as the launcina of "e -permits" to allow the public to track active permits. San Rafael continues to evaluate the effectiveness and responsiveness of its engagement with the community, makina strides to encourage participation as addressed in policies G-5 to G-8 below. San Rafael benefits from broad community involvement in local planning matters. Throuqh partnerships with local organizations and involvement with the community, the Citv has been able to take collaborative approaches towards providing services to the public and findina cost-effective solutions for services. Examples of partnerships include the renovation of Beach Park with Terrapin Crossroads and manaaement of Canal Communitv Garden provided by Canal Alliance. Citizen interest and participation in the public forum has been and continues to be an integral part of the policv and plan development process.San Rafael's experience has been that such involvement is beneficial for effective land use decision-making and neighborhood design as well as housing availability, quality, and affordability. G-5. Leadership. Provide responsive and effective leadership to achieve the City's vision, consistent with the Community En�a2ement Action Plan. G -5a. Staff Leadership Skills. Recruit, train and retain highly competent employees. Continue providing regular orientations and leadership training to City employees. Responsibility: Human Resources Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time G -5b. Board and Commission Training. Develop an annual orientation to City government for members of San Rafael City Council, boards, commissions, and advisory groups. Provide information about the roles and responsibilities of effective civic leadership. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / GOVERNANCE 209 Responsibility: City Clerk, City Attorney Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time G -5c. Leadership Training. Encourage efforts to provide leadership training by community groups such as Canal Ministry, Marin Interfaith Youth Outreach, local schools, neighborhood associations and the Chamber of Commerce. Encourage City staff and board and commission members to participate in leadership training programs. Responsibility: City Manager, Community Development, Community Services Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time G -5d. City Hall Academy. Consider creation of a City Hall Academy to provide training in City governance and public involvement. Prepare and distribute information about effective involvement in government activities. Responsibility: City Manager Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time G -5e. Advocacy at Regional and State Level. Seek appointment to regional and State committees and boards and continue to advocate for State legislation which can affect City services and further City objectives. Responsibility: City Manager, City Council Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff and Council member's time G-6. Broad -Based Involvement. Establish methods to encourage broad-based, meaningful community involvement. Encourage residents who historically have not been involved in political processes to become engaged in government, consistent with the Community En2a2ement Action Plan. G -6a. Community Stakeholders. Actively seek community -wide representation and public involvement opportunities on City issues through vigorous outreach programs to engage residents who are not typically involved, such as young people and residents not fluent in English. Responsibility: City Manager, City Clerk, Community Development, Community Services Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time See G -8c (San Rafael Website) and G -5d (City Hall Academy). G-7. Community Participation. Encourage and support public participation in the formulation and review of policies, especially neighborhood level planning. Work with community groups and other organizations to develop, implement and evaluate strategies that enhance San Rafael's neighborhoods, consistent with the Communitv Enaaaement Action Plan. 210 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / GOVERNANCE Amended 1/13/2016 Gla. Review of Facilities Proposed by Other Public Agencies. Encourage other public agencies such as Marin County and the school districts, to participate in the City's design review process. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time See CD -15a (Notification and Information about Development Projects), I -5a (Design Review), H-3a4a (Neighborhood Meetings) and G -18a (Collaboration with Local Agencies). G-8. City and Community Communication. Emphasize effective communication between City Hall and the community -at -large. Involve stakeholders in City projects as early as possible, consistent with the Communitv Enea2ement Action Plan. G -8a. Information about Community Issues. Make i available to increase understanding and insight into the affect the community. Where possible, information about City services and programs should be made available in languages other than English, e.g., Spanish or Vietnamese. Use the City newsletter, community meetings, electronic means, and media that reaches the varied population groups in San Rafael. Responsibility: City Manager, Community Development, City Clerk Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time G -8b. Contact Database. Maintain a database of stakeholders who attend community meetings and want to be involved. Centralize or consolidate community -wide mailing lists that include representation from homeowners associations, neighborhood and service groups, the faith community, the school districts, the business community and other interest groups. Responsibility: Community Development, City Clerk, City Manager Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time nformation about community issues complexity of challenges that Volunteerism in San Rafael The City of San Rafael Volunteer Program was created in 1996. The purpose of the program is to develop volunteers within City government and to partner with neighborhood and community groups to build a better San Rafael. Volunteers are recruited for a variety of tasks, jobs, and projects, including the annual Daffodil Planting Days, the Spring and Fall Clean Up Days, the City Hall Concierge Desk and all the departments within City Hall. Over 1,000 individuals volunteer each year. Together, these stalwart citizens contribute over one million dollars of service to the City annually! This is a tremendous donation of time and energy deserving of special recognition which is a hallmark of this program. G -8c. San Rafael Website. Use the City's website to invite people to participate in City government and to provide access to City information and documents and links to community organizations. Create new methods to distribute cost-effective electronic notification about City activities, meetings, and programs, and to interact with the community. Responsibility: Information Services, City Manager Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time See CD -15a (Notification and Information about Development Projects). G-9. Advisory Committees. Use appointed boards, task forces, commissions, and other advisory and ad hoc committees to assist City staff and the City Council in decision-making processes. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / GOVERNANCE 211 G -9a. City Boards and Commissions. On a periodic basis, review the purpose of City boards and commissions. In addition, assess appointment procedures and member representation to ensure public involvement, new ideas and adequate advice and recommendation to Council. Consider the benefits and disadvantages of establishing term limits for members of City Boards and Commissions to encourage more public involvement and new ideas. Responsibility: City Manager, Departments with advisory boards and commissions Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time G -9b. Recognition and Feedback. Recognize departing commission members for their contributions. Goad et exit in4en,i wc,-itith Interview board and commission members about their experiences when they complete their service aO=rnix�ro.. �o�. Consider involving retired commission members in training new commissioners. Responsibility: Departments with advisory boards and commissions Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time See CD -15a (Notification and Information about Development Projects) and I -5a (Design Review). G-10. Volunteerism in Government. Encourage and support people of all ages and backgrounds to volunteer with the City, and develop volunteerism at all levels of City government. G -10a. Volunteer Program. Create meaningful volunteer opportunities within City departments and foster worthwhile community projects through partnerships with In 2004, over 1,700 neighborhoods and service groups. Recruit new volunteers from various sources including volunteers contributed schools, seniors, neighborhoods and local business. Recognize volunteers for their service more than 28,500 to the City. hours and over $1.2 Responsibility: Human Resources, City Manager million worth of donated labor. Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time G-11. Empower Residents to Take Responsibility. Provide opportunities to increase residents' skills and knowledge to promote community involvement. G -11a. City Training Programs. Continue, and improve where possible, City -sponsored programs such as: • Community Emereencv Response Team (CERT)Disaste� f Tminirzg (PART) • Citizens Police Academy • CPR training and first aid • Neighborhood Crime Watch • Neighborhood Clean-up Days Responsibility: Fire Department, Police Department, Human Resources (Volunteer Program) Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time See G -5d (City Hall Academy), G -10a (Volunteer Program), S -26a (Public Safety Training), S -33a (Disaster Preparedness Plan) and S -40b (Enrollment in Training Programs). 212 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / GOVERNANCE Amended 1/13/2016 G-12. Local Elections. Encourage participation in local elections. G -12a. Voter Information. Support voter registration drives, and participate in voter education programs. Educate students, new residents and new U.S. citizens about how to participate in local elections. Continue to provide voter registration information at City Hall, community centers, and libraries. Responsibility: Community Services, Library, City Clerk Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time G -12b. Voter Participation. Work with the County to publicize the number of people voting in elections. Fo"ncmplo, Favide a link to the County's website about election res - Responsibility: City Clerk, Management Services Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time GOAL 22: EDUCATIONAL EXCELLENCE It is the goal of San Rafael to have excellent schools and enhanced lifelong education. The City will support the school districts' efforts to ensure access to quality education for everyone. The City of San Rafael offers and supports a wide range of programs to fulfill the needs of the community including adult education classes, literacy tutoring, career development and technology courses, childcare, and after school programs. The City of San Rafael recognizes the value of schools and education to the community. The City is committed to taking a leadership role in collaborating with school districts in San Rafael to ensure that exceptional education is provided to a wide spectrum of students. San Rafael is also committed to offering classes and programs that provide lifelong educational opportunities. There are three public school districts in the San Rafael planning area (Dixie Elementary, San Rafael Elementary, and the San Rafael High School District). In addition to the sixteenfifteen public schools in the San Rafael planning area, there are seventeenn+ne private schools, which. Al. of these are elementary schools except Marin Academy. San Rafael is also home to Dominican University with over 2,200400 students. In addition, a number of classes and programs are offered by the City of San Rafael, including pre -kindergarten programs and adult education classes at community centers, cultural and arts classes at Falkirk Cultural Center, and the Marin Literacy Program at the San Rafael Public Library. Over 2,2004-;9-0-0 undergraduate and graduate students attend Dominican University. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / GOVERNANCE 213 G-13. Education. Collaborate with schools, from preschools to the university level, in fostering educational programs to benefit the community. G -13a. Partnerships with Schools. Participate in school projects and career days to educate young people about local issues and City government and financing. Responsibility: City departments Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time G-14. Relationship with School Districts. Maintain a close, collaborative relationship with the school districts to maximize public benefit. The community celebrated the opening of the new Coleman Elementary School campus. G -14a. Communication with the School Districts. Maintain regular communications with the School Districts to foster community collaborations. Continue periodic joint City Council and School Board meetings on topics of mutual interest. Responsibility: City Manager Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time G-15. School Facilities as Gathering Places. Collaborate with schools to provide greater access to school facilities for neighborhood and community activities. G -15a. Joint Use of Educational Facilities. Develop and adopt Memorandum of Understanding agreements with Dixie and San Rafael School Districts, Marin Academy, and Dominican University governing the development, maintenance, and community use of facilities for recreation, childcare and/or community events. Responsibility: City Manager, Community Services Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time See PR -20 (City -School Cooperation). G-16. Business and School Relationships. Strengthen the positive working relationship between the business community and the schools to enhance the quality of education. G -16a. Internships. Provide governmental internships with local high schools and college within the various city departments. Encourage local businesses to provide internships and mentoring programs. Assist with publicity about internship opportunities. Responsibility: All Departments Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time 214 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / GOVERNANCE Amended 1/13/2016 6-17. City Programs and Classes. Offer programs and classes to address the needs and interests of the whole community. G -17a. City Programs and Classes. Continue to offer a variety of leisure, recreation, educational and personal enhancement courses and programs for all age groups at the Community Centers, Falkirk Cultural Center, Library and other public and private facilities. Regularly assess participants and the public at large to determine interests and support. Responsibility: Community Services, Library Timeframe: Ongoing Funding: Fees, Volunteers GOAL 23: SUPPORT FOR CARE PROVIDERS It is the goal of San Rafael to have collaborative efforts to support those who are in need. There are many public, private and non-profit providers in San Rafael, which help seniors, people with disabilities, homeless people, families who are disadvantaged, and others. The City supports these providers as appropriate to maintain San Rafael as a compassionate city. As a compassionate city, San Rafael collaborates with agencies that provide services to those who are in need. Coordination among government and private organizations helps stretch resources. Over 70 private and public organizations within San Rafael offer a broad range of aid and services such as meals, housing, health care and counseling to individuals and families. Organizations provide rehabilitation and adaptive technologies to people living with disabilities. In addition, there are many group homes for the elderly and people with disabilities. San Rafael is distinguished by being the center and headquarters for national and local innovative and creative organizations. G-18. Support for Special Needs Groups. Encourage government and business support for non-profit and other organizations that provide services to the elderly, people with disabilities, homeless people, and others in need. Support efforts of Marin County to encourage the availability of social services throughout the County. G -18a. Collaboration with Local Agencies. Work with non -profits and other organizations on priorities, services and facilities. Assist in establishing avenues of communication between non -profits and neighbors. Current examples include supporting efforts to provide emergency shelter and transitional housing to homeless individuals, families and victims of domestic violence, and working with local organizations on sidewalk accessibility. Responsibility: City Manager, Community Development, Economic Development, Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time, CDBG Funds Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / GOVERNANCE 215 G-1 8b. County and Other Cities' Programs. Collaborate with Marin County and other Marin cities to support efforts to provide effective and efficient social services in the region. Responsibility: City Manager Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time, Grants G18c. Zoning Allowance. Provide zoning allowance for group homes, transitional housing and treatment facilities, but preclude over -concentration of such facilities in residential neighborhoods as allowed by state law. Per the requirements of SB2. Zoning Ordinance amendments have been drafted to incorporate new definitions for "transitional housine" and "sunoortive housins" Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time G-19. Interdepartmental Approach. Continue innovative interdepartmental efforts that enable residents to access needed health care and social services. G19a. Interdepartmental Collaboration. Encourage and support interdepartmental efforts to address local health care and social service needs. Examples include community policing, community fire servicing, and the Health and Safety Committee. Responsibility: City Manager, All Departments Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time, Grants 216 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / GOVERNANCE Amended 1/13/2016 GOAL 24: FUNDING FOR CITY SERVICES It is the goal of San Rafael to have sufficient funding for city services. San Rafael provides a broad range of services to meet diverse residential and business community needs. The City continues to explore new avenues offunding to maintain and improve city services and the quality of life. Maintaining and enhancing San Rafael's revenue base is necessary for the City to provide essential and prioritized, desired services. The City must maintain sound financial practices that meet applicable standards and direct San Rafael's financial resources to achieve its short- and long-term goals. G-20. Public Involvement in the Budget Process. Maintain an open dialogue with the public to evaluate and prioritize needed services. G20a. Public Involvement. Continue to involve residents and businesses in the budget process to the extent feasible, through community meetings, telephone surveys, focus groups, and other outreach methods. Responsibility: City Manager Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time G-21. Financial Planning. Plan for both short- and long-term financial needs. G-21 a. Financial Management Policy Updates. Review and update the Financial Management Policies as changes in community needs or other considerations warrant such policy review. Responsibility: Management Services Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time G-22. Program Assessments. Evaluate the performance of city programs and services in achieving their stated goals as part of the City's budget process. Retain, adjust or eliminate programs or services as appropriate. G22a. Program Assessment. Continue to provide the City Council semi-annual reports on progress made toward achieving goals and objectives and meeting performance indicators. Look at ways to effectively and objectively measure performance, and consider establishing benchmarks to determine progress in the implementation of City policies. Responsibility: Management Services, Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing; (for benchmark study: long term) Resources: Staff Time G22b. Residents' Feedback. Use appropriate methods to regularly survey residents on the satisfaction levels regarding various City services and programs. Responsibility: Management Services, Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / GOVERNANCE 217 G-23. Government Financing. As an alternative to increased taxation, pursue methods to diversify funding sources to adequately finance government functions, including: • Seeking grant funding. • Using economic development to leverage opportunities to provide needed public services. Determining the full cost of services and charging fees, as appropriate, to recover those costs. Fees may be adjusted based on the priorities and needs of the community. Seeking ways to streamline services and reduce fees and charges. G -23a. Revenue Monitoring. Continue to maintain a revenue monitoring system to assist in trend analysis and revenue forecasting. Responsibility: Management Services Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time G -23b. Grants. Actively seek grant opportunities, and encourage interdepartmental cooperation and coordination in preparing grant applications. Responsibility: Management Services Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time G -23c. Cost of Services. Periodically evaluate the cost of providing services and adjust fees accordingly. Responsibility: Management Services Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time See also G-10 (Volunteerism in Government), I -2b (Diversified Funding), LU -17a (Retail and Services Uses in Industrial and Office Areas), and EV -8a (Industrial Zoning). G-24. Local Government Partnerships. Partner with other local governments and organizations to provide community services and cost-effectively resolve shared problems. G -24a. Funding Strategies for Infrastructure and Services. Develop, in cooperation with other jurisdictions, funding strategies for governmental infrastructure and services that take into account local and regional economic development goals and consider the costs to, and benefits for, the jurisdictions and the region. An example is a Joint Power Agreement for shared services, such as the Marin County Congestion Management Agency and Marin Emergency Radio Authority. Responsibility: Management Services, Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time G -24b. New Revenue Sources for City Services and Infrastructure. Consider establishing new revenue sources to adequately fund services and infrastructure. Such funding would require voter approval and a broad-based community campaign. Responsibility: City Manager Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time 218 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / GOVERNANCE Amended 1/13/2016 Sustainability Introduction Economic opportunity, a vibrant community, or miles of beautiful open space, there are many reasons why San Rafael inspires those who live, work, and play in this unique city. Over many decades, the City's collection of neighborhoods has grown, filled in with families and businesses, matured, and become reinvigorated again with each new cycle of arrivals. Today, San Rafael is a living tapestry. It is exemplified by an enduring mix of community goodwill, respect for our diverse cultural roots, appreciation of our natural resources, and innovative thinking. Our community preserves those qualities that make this city a great place and seizes opportunities to enhance it. Because San Rafael has so much to offer, there are compelling reasons to plan judiciously for its future. The Sustainability Element is San Rafael's guiding strategy to actively adapt to ongoing changes within the community and in the environment. In concert with other elements within the General Plan and with the City's Climate Change Action Plan, it defines the City's goal of becoming a sustainable community by providing stewardship of our shared natural resources, creating economic resilience, and contributing to the social well-being of its citizens. The Sustainability Element is a bridge spanning what San Rafael is today, and how it takes shape in the future. To meet the community's present needs without compromising its ability to do the same for future generations, the City government is committed to achieving sustainability in all aspects of community planning and governance. While San Rafael is making progress towards this ideal, there is much more that can be and must be accomplished. Incorporating sustainability at the city government level supports a decision making process that examines constraints and opportunities, as well as short term gains and long term impacts. It clarifies the goals and vision of San Rafael and forms a comprehensive strategy recognizing that one solution can solve multiple problems. The Sustainability Element and other General Plan elements illustrate San Rafael's hallmark of community based planning; where engaged residents and businesses work with City staff and elected officials to identify and resolve General Plan themes such as managing traffic, providing affordable housing and supporting economic diversity. While no General Plan element takes precedence over others, the Sustainability Element provides an additional focus on the City of San Rafael's decision making process to ensure that our community's valued foundations and resources are preserved, enhanced and restored. Our Foundation Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020/SUSTAINABILITY 218-1 Sustainability: Balancing the Environment, Economy and Social Equity Planning and development for the evolving needs of San Rafael brings many challenges. Well into its second century, the City and its residents value the distinct collection of neighborhoods and the surrounding open space. To preserve the character of San Rafael, land use and development are carefully evaluated to determine optimum use and impact on surrounding neighborhoods. The City meticulously manages its established network of streets to run efficiently. To accommodate anyone wishing to live here, the City encourages housing for a variety of income levels. Working with other elements of the General Plan, the Sustainability Element provides an additional thread tying all elements together, forging a community that exists in harmony with the environment and local economy, while promoting a healthy, engaged and culturally diverse community. Meeting present and future community needs requires San Rafael to balance three inter -related foundations of the community: the environment, the economy, and social equity. Each foundation is vital to a thriving community and must be valued equally in relation to the remaining two. For example, a healthy economy may provide many jobs, but jobs filled by employees who commute to work alone from outlying areas create negative consequences for the environment and society in the form of increased fuel consumption and traffic congestion, less local employment, and degradation of air quality. The Sustainability Element and other General Plan Elements take a broad view of the City's planning issues, but hone in on the fundamental problems requiring solutions. San Rafael pledges to confront environmental, economic and societal imbalances so that our community becomes resilient and adaptable at its core. Foundations of Sustainability Environment: A sustainable environment is one in which people, plants, animals and other organisms live harmoniously together within the same ecosystem, without doing harm to it or each other. Protection, restoration, management, and conservation of our shared natural resources such as land, water and air, is crucial to achieving a sustainable environment. Economy: A sustainable economy is diverse in its offerings of goods and services to a range of consumers within our community. A sound economy includes jobs that employ varying skill levels that match those found locally. Businesses in a sustainable economy are environmentally responsible, provide positive benefits to their employees and the community and have the strength to weather national and global market swings. Locally based businesses are especially important to a resilient local economy. Social Equity: Social equity in a sustainable community promotes inclusiveness in the City's current and future planning and development. Access to community services, transportation, education, jobs, government and recreation are provided to all residents. A sustainable community also protects its residents from potential hazards through recognition and awareness of our changing environment, promoting adaptative behavior through programs and decision making strategies that include partnerships with the community. 218-2 SAN RAFAEL 2020/SUSTAINABILITY Amended 1/13/2016 Community Partnerships for a Sustainable San Rafael Effective city governance starts with a strong partnership with the people it serves. San Rafael has a long history of providing options for residents, neighborhood associations, businesses, and other community groups to bring their ideas, issues and concerns directly to local government. The General Plan 2020, including the Sustainability Element, are prime examples of our community stepping up and working with City staff to communicate their needs and vision for a sustainable city. Through public workshops, community meetings, and the City's website, these forums facilitate an ongoing dialogue, a key to keeping San Rafael responsive to its citizens. Feedback assists the City in prioritizing local issues, while allowing opportunities to educate and inform. The City recognizes that active community participation is vital to implementing effective governance. Public discussion sessions consistently mention improving and preserving San Rafael's quality of life and vitality, while maintaining its essential character. The City's General Plan elements, including the Sustainability Element specifically address these concerns. Climate Change Action Plan There is undeniable evidence that climate change is happening now. Excessive consumption of our earth's natural resources for energy, transportation and lifestyle choices contribute to rising greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions largely in the form of carbon dioxide (CO2), which causes the global climate to warm. Higher temperatures triggered by climate change can bring intensive weather-related events; massive droughts and forest fires in some areas, severe rainstorms and flooding in others. In San Rafael, a primary concern regarding climate change is rising sea level due to the melting of polar ice caps. A 3' rise in sea level would flood nearly all of southeastern San Rafael and parts of downtown, devastating our community by destroying or disrupting our neighborhoods, local businesses and community infrastructure. At the State level, law makers have also taken notice of climate change issues. In 2006, California legislators signed into law AB32 and SB375, complementary plans to reduce GHG emissions to 1990 levels from `business -as -usual' levels by 2020, a roughly 30% overall reduction. Using current GHG levels, this translates into a 15% reduction by 2020. San Rafael's GHG emissions in 2005 Recognizing the magnitude of the reduction goal and the importance of complying, San Rafael began proactively studying the sources of GHG emissions in the community. In 2008, the City brought together residents, community groups, county and regional agencies, and environmental consultants for a series of workshops and outreach sessions to develop a comprehensive plan to curb GHG emissions and combat the effects of climate change. During its investigation, the City identified three major GHG contributors (transportation, buildings, waste) and quantified community -wide emissions and those from Satellite image of San Rafael based on a 3 foot rise in sea level. Bay Conservation and Development Commission. 2009 Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / SUSTAINABILITY 218-3 the City's municipal operations. The community vision and recommendations culminated as San Rafael's Climate Change Action Plan 2009 (CCAP) which targets an ambitious 25% GHG reduction goal from 2005 levels by 2020 and an 80% reduction by 2050. The 25% GHG reduction goal by 2020 exceeds the 15% expectation of AB 32 and will require reductions GHG Emissions Forecast and Reduction Goal: 2005-2035 beyond the specific programs in the CCAP to lower 500,000 400,000 300,000 200,000 100,000 GHG emissions. The remainina 10% reduction is anticipated to come from addition community reduction efforts and effects of federal programs. The CCAP is intended to be updated frequently based on experience in implementing programs, monitoring of GHG emissions, changes in state and federal statutes and best practices of other local governments. 2005 2010 2020 2030 2035 The CCAP was updated in 2011 to include a ■waste ,Transportation .commercial/Industrlal ■Residential quantified GHG Reduction Strategy and monitoring program, also a key component of the Sustainability San Rafael's GHG Element. To truly become a sustainable community, emissions forecast San Rafael will need to accept that program implementation is a dynamic process, and reduction goals. involving objective review, community input and collaboration with sustainable thinking in both plan and action. Measuring Progress While the Sustainability Element proposes many programs designed to fulfill our goal of significantly reducing our GHG emissions while simultaneously becoming a sustainable community, the true test of progress will be achieving measurable results based on quantifiable data. By using a defined set of indicators, the City can compare results year by year and make adjustments as necessary to improve program effectiveness. The Goals, Policies, and Programs section of this element includes a set of indicators that the City will use in its annual reporting. For example, collecting annual data on public bus ridership within San Rafael provides an indicator of whether programs geared toward reducing auto transportation and CO2 emissions in the City are successful. Because San Rafael is commited to cutting GHG emissions 25% by 2020, monitoring progress on sustainability initiatives is extremely important and it is imperative that San Rafael use indicators that are easily understood, attainable, and quantifiable. 218-4 SAN RAFAEL 2020/SUSTAINABILITY Amended 1/13/2016 Relationship to Other Elements Sustainability is an "umbrella" objective that affects many aspects of community planning and municipal operations. Most elements of the General Plan contribute policies and programs that further the City's sustainability goals. ■ The Land Use and Housing Elements guide much of San Rafael's growth along transit lines and in concentrated mixed-use areas such as the Downtown and Northgate/Civic Center. They seek to accommodate a very diverse community, including housing for all income levels. ■ The Neighborhoods and Design Elements foster distinct neighborhoods with a unique sense of place, preservation of historic structures and natural hillsides and convenient mobility without dependence on automobiles. ■ The Economic Vitality Element promotes a vibrant local economy, environmentally -friendly businesses and green jobs. ■ The Circulation Element looks forward to a balanced transportation network with convenient transit, extensive bicycle facilities, pleasant pedestrian ways and private vehicles powered by renewable energy. ■ The Governance Element fosters a local government that is inclusive, transparent and celebrates the diversity of the community. ■ The Culture and Arts and Parks and Recreation Elements promote cultural and recreational activities which bring residents together in healthy ways. ■ The Safety Element anticipates the need to adapt to the impacts of climate change such as sea level rise and disaster planning. ■ The Open Space and Conservation Elements address preservation and restoration of natural areas and species habitat, energy and water conservation, waste reduction and green building. ■ The Air and Water Quality Element fosters reduction in air and water pollution and soil preservation. GOAL 1: It is the goal of San Rafael to have a sustainable community, one that balances the needs of the environment, the economy and a diverse society. A sustainable community is one that improves its economy, built environment and lifestyles within the limits and opportunities provided by the natural environment. Living within the carrying capacity of natural systems will improve the resilience of our community to withstand market shifts and the effects of climate change. The Built Environment The way that we develop our city determines how efficiently we are able to use natural resources, including energy and building materials. The vast majority of San Rafael's greenhouse gas emissions come from energy use in buildings and transportation. A denser living environment with services close by can reduce vehicular trips by 40 percent. Green building techniques can reduce energy use in buildings by 20-50 percent. SU -1. Land Use. Implement General Plan land use policies to increase residential and commercial densities within walking distance of high frequency transit centers and corridors. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / SUSTAINABILITY 218-5 SU -la. Transportation Alternatives. Consider land use and transportation alternatives (better bicycle and pedestrian access and increased transit feeder service) to best use the future Civic Center SMART Station. Responsibility: Community Development, Public Works Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Grants, Transportation Agencies SU -lb. Walkable Neighborhoods. Determine areas in need of sidewalk improvements, land use changes, or modified transit stops to create walkable neighborhoods. Responsibility: Community Development, Public Works Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time SU -2. Promote Alternative Transportation. Decrease miles traveled in single -occupant vehicles. SU -2a. Bike Share Program. Facilitate the creation of a bike share program, particularly in the Downtown area. Conduct a feasibility study to determine feasibility, scale, and costs. Responsibility: Public Works, Economic Development Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Private Vendors, Grants, Parking District, Measure A SU -2b. Car Share Program. Facilitate the creation of a car share program, particularly in the Downtown area. Conduct a feasibility study to determine feasibility, scale, and costs. Responsibility: Public Works, Economic Development Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Private Vendors, Grants, Parking District, Measure A SU -2c. Bus Service. Support Marin Transit and the Transportation Authority of Marin in the planning, funding and implementation of additional transit services that are cost- effective and responsive to existing and future transit demand. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Measure A, State Transportation Funds SU -2d. SMART. Encourage continued funding, development and use of SMART, which will provide residents and employees of San Rafael an additional transportation alternative to single -occupant vehicles. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Short Term Resources: SMART SU -2e. Sidewalk and Street Improvements. Continue to implement sidewalk and bicycle improvements in accordance with the adopted Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan and the Safe Routes to School program. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: State Transportation funds, Measure A SU -2f. Transit to Schools. Encourage the school districts, Marin Transit and the Transportation Authority of Marin to increase funding for school busing programs, promote carpooling and limit vehicle idling. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: General Fund, grants 218-6 SAN RAFAEL 2020/SUSTAINABILITY Amended 1/13/2016 SU -3. Alternative Fuel and Fuel Efficient Vehicles. Promote the use of alternative fuel and fuel efficient vehicles. SU -3a. Public Charging Stations. Install charging stations for plug-in electric vehicles in City garages and parking lots. Responsibility: Public Works, Parking Services, Community Development Timeframe: Shart TerinOngoing Resources: Grants, Parking District SU -3b. Charging Stations for Private Facilities. (Deleted) IN-rioj k/ail to faeilitate f aharging st4tiens4b yl ug in oleet+ie ehiele in private parking faeilities. Respanoi✓lity: Community Timet ma: fjrt Term Reso fees. Coag Time SU -3c. Regional Charging Stations. Support regional efforts to encourage use of plug-in electric vehicles and widespread availability of charging stations for electric vehicles. Responsibility: Public Works, Community Development Timeframe: Short nOngoing Resources: Staff Time SU -4. Renewable Energy. Increase the supply of renewable energy sources. Promote and encourage residences to be resource. enerev and water efficient by creatine incentives and removing obstacles to promote their use. SU -4a. Marin Energy Authority. Support efforts of the Marin Energy Authority to increase the proportion of renewable power offered to residents and businesses and to provide financial and technical assistance for energy efficiency upgrades. Responsibility: City Manager Timeframe: Shart TennOngoing Resources: Marin Energy Authority SU -4b. PACE Financing. Participate in an assessment district financing (PACE) program to fund installation of renewable energy systems and other efficiency upgrades to existing buildings. Responsibility: Qmvminiyr'e��t0ty Manaeer Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time, Outside financing SU -4c. Energy Efficiency Outreach. Continue to inform businesses and residents of programs and rebates to conserve energy. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Short nOngoing Resources: Staff Time SU -4d. Wind and Solar. Adar. oaning all o and fee reduetions for reside- ra power generators gra solar ea"ee'ers. Consider methods to reduce barriers in the wind and solar system Dermit Drocess. such as the expedited Dermit Drocess for small residential rooftop solar systems. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time SU -4e. Reeional Enerev Office. Consider DarticiDation in the Countv's Regional Enerev Office. Responsibility: Citv Manaeer Timeframe: Lone Term Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / SUSTAINABILITY 218-7 Resources: Staff Time P eviouslv CON -17a (Regional Energv Office) Title 24 Standards The California Building Code establishes building energy efficiency standards for new construction (including requirements for entire new buildings, additions, alterations, and in nonresidential buildings, repairs). Since first established in 1977, the Building Energy Efficiency Standards (along with standards for energy efficiency in appliances) have helped Californians save more than $11.3 billion in electricity and natural gas costs. The Standards are updated periodically to allow incorporation of new energy efficiency technologies and methods. SU -4f. Zoning and Building Code Review. Identifv barriers to resource efficiencv in the Zoning and Building Codes and evaluate the suitability of removing_ those obstacles. Responsibility: Communitv Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time Previously CON -18b (Energy-efficient Homes SU -42. Clean Energv Production. Encourage options, such as photovoltaic cells, for energv production. Seek ways to provide incentives for solar and clean energv systems. Responsibility: Communitv Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Grants Previouslv CON -18d (Incentives for Solar and Clean Energ_ v) and CON -19a (Energy Production) SU -5. Reduce Use of Non -Renewable Resources. Reduce dependency on non-renewable resources. (Deleted) SU -5a. Green Building Regulations. P construction and remodel p ects to comply with adopted green building regulations. Respensibility�.Gc~_-zx.,�y Development TimefFame: SkoFt Tefm Resoweesi Staff Time SU -5b. Use of Alternative Building Materials. Evaluate the benefits and impacts of amending the Citv's building codes and zoning ordinances to allow the use of acceptable resource -efficient alternative building_ materials and methods. Responsibility: Communitv Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time Previously CON -18c (Use of Alternative Building Materials) SU -505b. Energy Efficiency Programs. Develop and implement energy efficiency and conservation programs to achieve a 20% reduction in energy use by 2020, including PACE financing, stretch building codes, energy audits, upgrades upon resale, education and outreach. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Short Resources: Staff Time, Marin Energy Authority, grants 218-8 SAN RAFAEL 2020/SUSTAINABILITY Amended 1/13/2016 SU -5d -Se. Water Efficiency Programs. Develop and implement wat4r efficiency and conservation programs to achieve a 30% reduction in water use by 2020, including water efficient landscape regulations, PACE financing, water audits, upgrades upon resale, education and outreach. Make available to DYODerty managers, desiene s and homeowners information about water -conserving landscaDin2 and water-recvclin;; ethods and resources. Responsibility: Community Development, Marin Municipal Water District Timeframe: C'�m�nOnngoing Resources: Marin Municipal Water District, Staff Time Merged with Drevious CON -20a (Water Conservine LandscaDing) SU -5e. Water Recvcling. SunDort the extension of recvcled water distribution infrastructure. Reauire the use of recvcled water where available. Resnonsibilitv: Community Develo_nment Timeframe: On2oina Resources: Fees Previouslv CON -20b (Water Recvclin2) SU-5d5f. Reflective Surfaces. Encourage the use of high albedo (reflectivity) materials for future outdoor surfaces such as parking lots, roadways, roofs and sidewalks. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: c'�mOngoing Resources: Staff Time SU -6. Resource Efficiency in Site Development. Encourage site Dlanning and development Dractices that reduce ener2V demand, support transportation alternatives and incorporate resource - and energv-efficient infrastructure. SU -6a. Site Design. Evaluate as hart of development review. nronosed site design for enersv-efficiencv, such as shadine of narkins lots and summertime shadins of south-facine windows. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Onaoin2 Resources: Fees Previouslv CON -22 (Resource Efficiencv in Site Develo_Dment) and CON -22a (Site Design) The Natural Environment Sustainability demands a respect for nature and our reliance on natural resources. By protecting and enhancing our environment we can reap rewards for generations to come. SU -76. New and Existing Trees. Plant new and retain existing trees to maximize energy conservation and carbon sequestration benefits. SU-7a6n. Tree Inventory. Inventory tree and vegetative cover to det�rmine existing resources and carbon sequestration, and establish citywide goals and strategies to increase carbon sequestration. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time, grants Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / SUSTAINABILITY 218-9 SU-7b6b. Tree Preservation. Adopt ordinances to regulate the removal and replacement of significant trees. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time, fees SU -6c. Parking Lot Landscaping. Update -Maintain zoning regulations for parking lot landscaping to increase shading and reduce thermal gain. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: c "�FaOngoing Resources: Staff T-uneTime SU-7c6d. Carbon Offset Program. Consider the feasibility of a local carbon offset program to support tree planting and maintenance. Responsibility: Public Works, Finance Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time, contributions SU -87-. Local Food Production. Increase local food production. SU-8a7a. Farmers Markets. Continue to promote local farmers markets. Responsibility: Economic Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Redevelopment ^gene Economic Development SU -8b -7b. Home and Community Gardens. Encourage the creation of home and community gardens, including possible use of surplus City properties for community gardens. Responsibility: Community Services Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time, grants, partnerships SU -8c. Communitv Garden Standards. Examine practices and standards that could be established to permit community Gardens by richt based on performance standards Responsibility: Communitv Services Timeframe: Oncoine Resources: Staff Time, Grants Previouslv PR -16a (Community Gardens) Lifestyles The success of the community in becoming more sustainable is largely dependent upon the willingness of residents to adopt lifestyles which are less demanding on natural resources. The City can encourage and enable residents and businesses to adopt sustainable lifestyles and operations. A sustainable community celebrates and is strengthened by its diversity. All residents have decent jobs, housing and an opportunity to participate in the governance of their community. SU -99. Social Diversity and Equity. Enhance social equity among all segments of the community. SU-9a8a. Affordable Housing. Continue to expand the supply of affordable housing, which reduces commute times and congestion. 218-10 SAN RAFAEL 2020/SUSTAINABILITY Amended 1/13/2016 Responsibility: Econonomic Development, Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Redevelopment ^ ,., ney, developer contributions See also H-4 (Governmental and Communitv Collaboration). H-69 (Funding for Affordable Housing),H-16 (Second Units), H-17 (Re"atory Incentives for Affordable Housing), H-184-9 (Inclusionary Housing Requirements),41-24-(Dan,�ty Bonwa3 and othe f Regulatory ineefftives F AFF cable 14cuc r Z 24 (Gen ,-ibut: s towards Employee-Hoa;ii,rb-), H 25 ' cSee n Units), EV -12 (Workforce Housing), G-1 (Jobs and Diversity), G-2 (Variety of Housing), G-6 (Broad -Based Involvement), and G-7 (Community Participation). SU -10-9. Zero Waste. Reduce material consumption and waste generation, increase resource re -use and composting of organic waste, and recycle to significantly reduce and ultimately eliminate landfill disposal. SU-10a9a. Zero Waste. Implement and monitor the Droeress of actions contained in the Adopt a Zero Waste Goal and a -Zero Waste Strategic Plan to aehieve this g�. Responsibility: City Manager Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Marin Hazardous and Solid Waste JPA SU -10b -9b. Home Composting. Develop a program to assist and educate residents in home -composting. Responsibility: City Manager Timeframe: Long TennOn og ing Resources: Marin Hazardous and Solid Waste JPA SU-10c1e. Community Composting. Create a community -scale composting program for food and green waste. Responsibility: City Manager Timeframe: c'�FaOngoing Resources: Marin Hazardous and Solid Waste JPA SU -10d -9d. Organic Waste -to -Energy. Encourage the creation of an organic waste -to - energy program. Responsibility: City Manager Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time SU -10e. Recvcline. Encoura2c efforts to Dromote recvclinh, such as encoura2in2 businesses to recvcle building and other materials, Dromotine comnostinc by restaurants, institutions and residences, and su_D_nortinc Marin Conservation Corps' work to promote recvcline. Responsibility: Citv Manager, Community Development Timeframe: On2oin2 Resources: Staff Time Previouslv CON -21 a (Recvclinc) SU -1 Of. Recvclable Waste Receptacles. Support efforts by Marin Sanitary to install recvclable waste receptacles in heavy pedestrian areas to encouraee recvclin2 of plastics, class, etc. Responsibility: Citv Manacer, Community Develo_Dment Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time Previouslv CON -21b (Recvclable Waste Receptacles) Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / SUSTAINABILITY 218-11 SU -10a. Recvcling for Apartments and Nonresidential Buildings. Encourage recvcling facilities and rTograms for apartment and nonresidential buildings. Consider the cost and benefits of expanding recvcling facilities and programs for apartment and nonresidential buildings. Responsikiility: City Manager Timeframe: Ongoing Resource.: Staff Time Previously CCN -21 c (Recvcline for Apartments and Nonresidential Buildings) SU -10h. Demolition Waste. Study ways to actively encourage ereater recycling and reuse of demolition waste. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time Previously CON -21d (Demolition Waste) SU -10i. Recvcling Education. Encouraee Marin Sanitary to continue its recvcling education vroerams, and to reach out to those not aware of the "reduce, reuse and recycle" technia_ues. Responsibility: City Manager Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time Previously CON -21e (Recvcling) SU-10i9e. Incentives for Waste Reduction and Recycling. Work with the City's waste franchisee to create additional incentives in the rate structure for waste reduction and recycling and expand the range of recycled products if resale markets exist. _Responsibility: City Manager, Marin Sanitary Timeframe: c'�FaOngoing Resources: Fees (Deleted) SU -9f. Construction Debris. Adopt enstF ,etiar debris and re tise ,...a;....., o Development Timeframe: Short TeFm A=ceSOUFOe: SU-lOk9g. Reuse Facilities. Assist in the development of additional reuse facilities (resale shops, refilling stations, repair shops and resource recovery yards). Responsibility: Community Development, Economic Development Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time (Deleted) SU -9h. Non -Recyclable Single Use Items. lfwesfiga4e ^-bens Fo: bark - ,.lable sifi& ulz i0mv, mah as Plastiif t gs WA pelyst5Te a take,.,,f f od , fi4ai er-s Respeasibilit ,. Community Deyei,,,.me fit T-iffiefreoei Shet4Te Reseufees: Staff Time 218-12 SAN RAFAEL 2020/SUSTAINABILITY Amended 1/13/2016 (Deleted) SU -9i. Commercial and Multi -Family Recycling. Adopt a Commercial and Res...onsib lity: ('tity TR.,.... geF Timeframe: Short Teel ResettFees: x Kkaataetts and Solid Write MA SU -114-8. Community Education and Engagement. Increase community education and engagement in sustainability efforts. SU-11a44a. Conservation Programs. Continue to connect businesses and residents with programs and rebates to conserve energy and water. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: c'�mOngoing Resources: Grants SU-11b44b. Resilient Neighborhoods and Businesses. Implement the Resilient Neighborhoods and Businesses program to encourage behavioral changes to reduce carbon emissions through effective education and peer group support. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: S Ongoing Resources: Grants SU-llclk. Promote Sustainability Efforts. Use the City's website and City publications and work with community organizations to promote sustainability efforts to both residents and businesses. Responsibility: City Manager Timeframe: c'��Ongoing Resources: Staff Time SU -110-0d. Green Festival. Partner with other agencies and organizations to hold an annual "green festival" to promote sustainability efforts. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: SK\ -4 Tc mOneoing Resources: Staff Time SU-1le4W. Vehicle Idling. Educate and encourage businesses and residents to limit vehicle idling. Responsibility: Police Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / SUSTAINABILITY 218-13 The Economy A diverse and local economy which provides opportunities and services for all segments of the community is more resilient to potential market shifts, including those which may result from the effects of climate change and changing sources of energy. SU -1244. Environmentally Beneficial Economy. Support environmentally beneficial businesses and job creation. SU -12a44 -a. Local Green Businesses. Continue to promote new green businesses opportunities. Responsibility: Economic Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Economic Development [remainder of page intentionally left blank] 218-14 SAN RAFAEL 2020/SUSTAINABILITY Amended 1/13/2016 SU-12b41b. Marin County Green Business Program. Support and encourage green businesses in conjunction with Marin County's Green Business Program. Responsibility: Economic Development; Marin County Timeframe: Short TermOngoing Resources: Redevelop etA ^ gene Economic Develonment Incomorated CON -17b (Green Business Program) SU-12c44e. Environmentally Beneficial Jobs. Support the creation of environmentally beneficial jobs, particularly for low income residents. Responsibility: Economic Development Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Redevelopment ^ rtene Economic Develonment Monitoring Sustainabilty Indicator Achieving a more sustainable community and will take concerted efforts. It will be necessary to monitor our progress and effectiveness, and to change course as warranted. SU -134-2. Monitor Sustainability Objectives and Indicators. Monitor success in achieving sustainability objectives and greenhouse gas reductions. SU -13a4 a. Monitor Sustainability Indicators and Greenhouse Gas Inventory. Periodically update the community and municipal greenhouse gas inventories, monitor changes in the identified sustainability indicators and periodically update the Climate Change Action Plan to achieve greenhouse gas reduction goals. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time, grants SU-13bl4b. Future Development and Capital Improvements. Evaluate future development applications and the City's Capital Improvement Program against compliance with the Sustainability Element and the GHG Emissions Reduction Strategy. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time, grants and Objectives responding to climate change Sustainability Indicators Indicators are quantifiable objectives that allow us to monitor and gauge our effectiveness at achieving sustainability goals. 1. Decrease miles travelled in single -occupant vehicles on local streets. Between 2005 and 2020 achieve: ■ A 10% reduction community -wide. 20% of City employees using alternate modes of commuting. 500 new housing units within '/2 mile of high frequency transit. 2. Promote energy savings from transportation. Between 2005 and 2020 achieve: A 20% reduction in annual per vehicle gallons of fuel purchased. 100 electric vehicle charging stations in public locations. 3. Reduce material consumption and achieve resource re- use. Between 2005 and 2025 achieve: ■ A 94% diversion of waste from landfills. 4. Reduce deoendencv on non-renewable resources Between 2005 and 2020 achieve: ■ A 20% reduction community electricity and natural gas use. ■ A 30% reduction in household water use. 5. Enhance social equity among all segments of the community. Between 2005 and 2020 achieve: - 560 new units of deed -restricted affordable housing. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 1 SUSTAINABILITY 218-15 SU -13c4 -2,e. Annual Reports. Prepare an annual report to the Planning Commission and City Council assessing the implementation of sustainability programs and the GHG Emissions Reduction Strategy. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time (Deleted) SU -12d. Sustainability Coordinator. leo a F/a-jtM%a flit; Geer-,ainater t a., o tzi .etiility a fe1#s. R 'fifneffame-SkeitTefm Reseufeesi Fuld, gftmts SU-13d43e. Sustainability Commission. Maintaip-Appeint a Sustainability Commission to advance sustainability efforts. Continue to hold the Climate Change Action Plan (CCAP) Ouarterlv Forum. which provides oversieht on the implementation Droeress of sustainabilitv programs. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Short Term Resources: General Fund 218-16 SAN RAFAEL 2020/SUSTAINABILITY Amended 1/13/2016 GOAL 2: It is the goal of San Rafael to have municipal operations that are highly resource efficient and anticipate the effects of climate change. Municipal operations constitute only one percent of the community's greenhouse gas emissions, but can be a meleader in sustainable practices. The City should anticipate and mitigate the effects of sea level rise and natural disasters which will be exacerbated by climate change. SU -1443. Municipal Programs. Implement municipal programs to demonstrate the City's commitment to sustainability efforts and reducing greenhouse gases. SU -14a4 -3a. Alternative Transportation Options. Provide transit and carpool incentive to City employees, including alternative work schedules and telecommuting opportunities. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Long Term Resources: General Fund, grants Incorporated CON -23a (City Carnool) SU-14bl4b. Alternative Fuel for City Fleet. Continue to implement existing City policy{ to purchase alternative fuel vehicles and increase the efficiency of the vehicle fleet. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: General Fund, grants Incorporated CON -24c (City Vehicle Fleet) SU -14c4 -3e. Limit Idling of City Vehicles. Adopt a policy to limit City vehicle idling where practical. Evaluate equipping trucks with an auxiliary electrical system for illumination and warning signs. Responsibility: Public Works, Police Fire Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time (Deleted) SU -13d. Green Purchasing. Modify the y/rastioes and poli4s. to become a „poi for other businesses and oS&im iqns. Respensibilit : T--';xsarn Timeffafne� Sheft Tel Dos..,., Staff Time (Deleted) SU -13e. Energy Audits Municipal Buildings. Complete efter-gy lits e renewable energy potential. Responsibility: WorksMar-in Energy ManagemeM T".,.� Timeframe: Short Test Resources: Staff Time nos � R SU-14dM City Electricity. Participate in the Marin Energy Authority by switching all City accounts over to the Light Green option in 2010 and the Deep Green option (100% renewable power) by 2020. Consider the use of renewable enerav technoloav such as solar, cogeneration and fuel cells in the construction or retrofittine of Citv facilities. Responsibility: City Manager Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / SUSTAINABILITY 218-17 Incornora ed CON -24d (Renewable Enerev Sources in Citv Facilities) SU-L46ft. Streetlights and Traffic Signals. Pursue funding to complete the retrofit of City traffic signals and retrofit streetlights with LED fixtures. Responsibility: Public Works Time frame: Short Term Reso-4rces: Staff Time SU-14fuh. Employee Awareness. Increase City employees'awareness of climate protection issues, and develop an internal committee to implement plans. Responsibility: City Manager Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time SU -14g4 -3i. Local Government Agency Involvement. Continue to provide a leadership role with other local governmental agencies to share best practices and successes. Responsibility: Community Development, Marin Climate and Energy Partnership Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time SU -14h4-. Advancing GHG and Sustainability Efforts. Advocate for state and federal legislation that advance greenhouse gas reductions and other sustainability efforts. Responsibility: City Manager Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time SU -14i. Civic Buildines. Reauire that new, expanded or renovated Citv buildines that exceed 5,000 square feet achieve CalGreen standards. This reauirement shall not aD01v to Citv facilities which are leased. Responsibility: Public Works Department Timeframe: On2oin2 Resources: General Fund, Capital Improvement Program, bonds or grants Previouslv CON -18f (Civic Buildings) SU -14i. Green Business Certification. Participate in Marin Countv's Green Business Droeram to become certified as a Marin Green Business. As Dart of the Dro2rams, review ways for the Citv to improve recvcline and resource -efficient purchases and designate a staff person in each department to establish and maintain recvclin2 in Citv facilities. Responsibility: Community Develo_Dment, Citv Manager Timeframe: On2oin2 Resources: Staff Time Previouslv CON -24a (Green Business Certification) SU -14k. Regional Collaboration. Participate in reeional collaborations between Dublic aeencies to enact and support new Drosrams or shared improvements which Dromote or utilize renewable enersv sources or reduce ener2v demand. Responsibility: Citv Manacer Timeframe: On2oin2 Resources: Staff Time Previouslv CON -24b (Reeional Collaboration) 218-18 SAN RAFAEL 2020/SUSTAINABILITY Amended 1/13/2016 SU -141. Backuu Energv Provision. Evaluate backup ener2V provisions for critical citv facilities and uperade as needed. Encourage the use of alternatives, such as fuel cell and solar ;generator backups, to the sustained use of easoline-powered venerators. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time See S -34a (Disaster Preparedness Plan) and S -34c (Neighborhood Disaster Preparedness). Previouslv CON -25a (Backup Enervv Provision) SU -154-4. Adapting to Climate Change. Increase understanding and preparation to adapt to the effects of climate change, including sea level rise. SU-15a44a. Vulnerability Assessment. Participate in Marin County's regional vulnerability assessment, and prepare a local vulnerability assessment for San Rafael. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time, grants SU-15b44b. Emergency Planning. Continue to provide emergency planning and community awareness. Responsibility: Emergency Services Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time, grants SU-15c44e. Levee Analysis. Develop a program of levee analysis, including inventorying heights, testing and maintaining public and private levees. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time, grants, private property owners SU-15d44d. Sea Level Monitoring and Planning. Work with the Bay Conservation and Development Commission (BCDC)-7 and other regional avencies, to monitor sea level rise and plan for shoreline defense. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Short Term Resources: General Fund, grants Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / SUSTAINABILITY 218-19 Culture and Arts Our Quality of Life Introduction The City of San Rafael is committed to addressing the interests and needs of a culturally diverse community and to promoting cross-cultural understanding through the arts. The City supports a range of cultural activities that includes the visual, literary and performing arts; historic preservation; and community celebrations. Recognized as the cultural center of the County, the City provides cultural, theatrical, literary and artistic opportunities for youth and adults at Community Centers, Public Libraries and the Falkirk Cultural Center. San Rafael is home to more than fifty arts and cultural organizations including, among others, Art Works Downtown, Belrose Theatre, Marin Ballet, the Marin Historical Museum, Marin Shakespeare Company, the Marin Symphony, the Rafael Film Center, and Youth in Arts. The City will work to preserve existing and develop new cultural institutions. Falkirk Cultural Center, listed on the National Historic Register, is owned and operated by the City of San Rafael. Built in 1888 and saved from demolition in 1974, the Queen Anne Victorian was named after the birthplace of owner Captain Robert Dollar. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CULTURE AND ARTS 219 GOAL 25: QUALITY CULTURAL AND LIBRARY SERVICES It is the goal for San Rafael to have quality arts, cultural, historical and library facilities, services and programs that serve a diverse population. Arts and culture are an integral part of San Rafael's quality of life. The City of San Rafael recognizes the value of cultural heritage and the arts to enrich and inspire its residents, build a sense of community, attract visitors, and revitalize the city, as well as to provide economic opportunity and generate revenue. CA -1. Cultural Center of Marin. Continue to promote San Rafael as the center of culture and arts in Marin County and strengthen partnerships between the City and local artists, art agencies and organizations, schools and businesses. CA -la. Community Vision of Culture and Arts in San Rafael. (Deleted) of,.,,,«ffe and . 1z, -*17 Eam ti fae Rai; z�lct✓.11t j'=��� �t171+Serviees D�amtizjm, 135 CA -lb. Promotion of Cultural Offerings. (Deleted) identify ic public, stFategublic place « Artists from as far .,..vo« .,.,a promote cultural,. rog wulmirg in tH away as Italy re- created the Sistine Chapel ceiling at Timzfafaei ehwtTe the 10th annual Rese ifees, Staff Time Goatt4bu4iaas and Peaa4iens n.,,.«ne (ships Youth In Arts Festival. CA -le. Partnerships. Encourage arts groups, schools and businesses to conduct programs in City venues. Responsibility: Community Services Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time, Fees, Contributions and Donations, Partnerships CA -2. Arts Plan. Advance an Arts Planwith a vision and strategy that: • Promotes effective public participation including San Rafael arts and cultural organizations, residents and workers in formulation of cultural policies and governance; • Encourages programs to enhance the missions of San Rafael arts and cultural organizations; • Maximizes use of City venues for cultural and arts events and programs. 220 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CULTURE AND ARTS Amended 1/13/2016 CA -2a. Funding. Identify funding to prepare an Arts Plan for San Rafael. Responsibility: Community Services Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Grants, Community Partnerships, Staff Time CA -2b. Arts Plan. Prepare an Arts Plan in partnership with the community, evaluating the current state of community arts and culture, incorporating, as feasible, vision plans developed by local organizations for culture and arts in San Rafael, conducting a needs assessment, setting goals and writing a strategic plan. Responsibility: Community Services Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Grants, Community Partnerships, Staff Time CA -3. Cultural and Arts Programs and Activities. Encourage and provide an array of both public and private cultural arts programs and activities addressing the needs and interests of the whole community. CA -3a. Youth Programs. Develop additional programming for children and youth. Responsibility: Community Services Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time, Fees, Grants CA -3b. Art Classes and Cultural Activities. Continue to provide arts classes and cultural activities. Responsibility: Community Services Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees, Grants CA -3c. Educational Programs. Promote cooperative educational cultural programs enlisting the aid of public and private institutions. Responsibility: Community Services, Library Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time, Fees, Grants, Partnerships CA -3d. City Facilities. Use City facilities, including Falkirk, for art exhibits and cultural performances by youth groups. Responsibility: Community Services Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time, Fees, Grants CA -3e. Funding Source. Seek a consistent funding source for arts and cultural activities. Responsibility: Community Services, Management Service Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time, Grants, Volunteers, Partnerships CA -4. Ethnic and Cultural Activities. Encourage and develop activities, entertainment and events that reflect a diverse ethnic and cultural heritage. Encourage participation in the arts as another method to promote intercultural understanding. CA -4a. Ethnic Activities, Cultural Performers and Diversity Programs. Provide venues and support for programs that enable members of the community to participate in diverse cultural activities. Responsibility: Community Services, Economic Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time, Fees, Grants Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CULTURE AND ARTS 221 CA -5. Public Art. Promote a stimulating and engaging environment through the greater display of artwork in public places. CA -5a. Art in Public Places. Seek a long-term source of funding for public art, such as an endowment fund, community partnerships, or an Art in Public Places Ordinance. Responsibility: Community Services Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time, Grants, Volunteers, Partnerships CA -6. Community Art. Encourage community art projects that create a greater understanding and appreciation of art and artists through community involvement. CA -6a. Neighborhood Arts Program. Develop neighborhood arts programs at the community centers. Responsibility: Community Services Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Grants, Volunteers, Partnerships CA -6b. Mural Review. Review and modify, as needed, the Planning Commission's resolution regarding mural review and approval. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time CA -6c. Community Art Contributions. (Deleted) Adopt a r-eseltitien establishing ing r-egulatiens regarding o-oxymtuni y e „t-4bations of ai t Resp ..,s;1.ik4y. romm.i.\�t;4DevelopfaePA-,-Eo.xxmx:�t3,- s3n,iees TifliefF --N ��rt T v CA -7. Event Participation. Encourage public and private participation in and support of arts and cultural events. CA -7a. Sponsorship of Events. Continue to sponsor arts and cultural events for public and private participation. Responsibility: Community Services, Economic Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time, Event Admission Fees, Grants, Volunteers, Partnerships CA -8. Facility Development. (Deleted) Develop d Ymin�ain r/ab-lo and eneoufage private etlittffal f4eilities to meet the growing ,,,a ,.hanging room of the am. muni CA -8a. Marin Center. (Deleted) Participate in and curt of its to renovate an enhance tin T\Lirin Center. R 2xp7�,-j-bdit�i City -Manager-, Community Development �7�,�� efrc��C�Sror! Resowz o: SUff Time Grants, Volunteers, PaFtner-ships !'� 1 T t Progr.,.ti..ti.;ng) ., 7 � b /Foo rtT. Street 222 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CULTURE AND ARTS Amended 1/13/2016 CA -9. Falkirk Cultural Center. Use the Falkirk Cultural Center as a venue to support and foster the arts and to celebrate local culture. Rehabilitate, expand and develop, as appropriate, the Falkirk building and grounds in keeping with its listing on the National Register of Historic Places. CA -9a. Falkirk Master Plan. (Deleted) Eensider ever-si& by t1 c Parl-r/--rA4?t � Co-mmmiacior.. Re.,;o... and ..d to the - ki v Falkirl-'s m4s, and to provide evefft-�� i14 wr— p . Time€r-ame:�e-rm CA -9b. Funding for Falkirk Cultural Center. Seek funding to sustain Falkirk's facilities and programs through expansion and income producing activities. Responsibility: Community Services Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time CA -9c. Community Support of Falkirk. Establish organization(s) to support Falkirk's activities. Responsibility: Community Services Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff time, Volunteers, Partnerships Falkirk's cultural offerings, which include parlor performances and concerts on the lawn, are sometimes historical, often educational and always entertaining. Cultural Affairs Service League ( C A S L ) Established in the mid-1970s, CASL is a volunteer organization offering substantial support for various activities at Falkirk Cultural Center, such as Holiday decorations, volunteer staffing for events, fundraising, and building upgrades. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CULTURE AND ARTS 223 The Public Library San Rafael Public Library, founded in 1887, is one of the most heavily used services in the City of San Rafael. Some 3,000 people visit the Library each week, seeking books to read for enjoyment, answers to questions, and information to complete homework or work-related assignments. The newest waves of users seek information via the Internet. The 14,000 sq. ft. San Rafael Public Library houses 125,000 items, including books, videocassettes, DVDs, books on cassette and CD, music CDs, microfilm, magazines, and newspapers. The Marin Literacy Program is based at the Library. Other programs include story times, summer reading, author talks, art lectures, delivery to the homebound, book clubs, and special events. The Carnegie wing of the San Rafael Public Library was built in 1908. The Canal Library Center at Pickleweed Park, housed in a room of the community center, offers reference books and a small collection of children's books that may be borrowed. Services include story times, computer access for children, and homework assistance. The community places a high priority on the Library's mission to provide books and other materials as well as access to online resources. It also values the work of the Marin Literacy Program and the Library's role in nurturing children's love of books and learning. CA -10. Library Services. Provide library services to meet the information and recreational needs of the community. CA-10a.Library Collections. Expand and adapt the collection to meet the changing needs of the community for different formats and interests while preserving a core collection of materials of continuing value. Responsibility: Library Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time, Rental Fees, Grants CA-10b.Children's and Youth Services. Emphasize programming and services for children and teens. Responsibility: Library Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time, Grants CA -10c. Senior Services. Develop programming and services for older adults. Responsibility: Library Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time, Grants CA -10d. Marin Literacy Program. Continue to build on the success of the Marin Literacy Program that provides tutoring for adults as well as support and training for volunteer tutors. Responsibility: Library Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Grants 224 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CULTURE AND ARTS Amended 1/13/2016 CA -11. San Rafael Public Library. Because the present library is too small to adequately provide the collection and services needed for a community of San Rafael's size, renovate and expand or replace the San Rafael Public Library in Downtown. CA -Ila. Facility Needs. Complete the library facility study of space needs for library services citywide. Consider potential new funding options to finance needed expansion of library facilities. Needs include the following: • Public Meeting Rooms. Provide public meeting rooms, large and small, within the library renovation and expansion • Seating. Provide adequate seating for quiet reading and study in new library facilities. • Children and Youth Services. Upgrade and expand space for children's services, and dedicate space to teen services, to enhance collections, technology and programming. Responsibility: Library, Management Services, Public Works Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time, Bonds, Grants, Tax, Donations CA -11c. Communications Infrastructure and Technology Access. Develop and maintain state-of-the-art electrical and telecommunications infrastructure throughout the Library building. Expand public access to the Internet and word processing as well as instruction in online research through library subscription to online databases. Responsibility: Library Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time, Bonds, Tax, Grants CA -12. Community -Based Libraries. Expand community-based library services in east and north San Rafael to assure that library services are provided throughout the city. CA -1 2a. Opportunities for Community -Based Libraries. Look for opportunities, such as the expansion of Pickleweed Park Community Center and The Mall at Northgate, for community-based libraries. Consider partnerships with the school districts to make high school libraries available to the public. Responsibility: Library Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time, Grants, Bonds, Tax San Rafael children enjoy the library's reading programs. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CULTURE AND ARTS 225 GOAL 26: PROTECTED CULTURAL HERITAGE It is the goal for San Rafael to have protected and maintained historic buildings and archaeological resources as part of San Rafael's cultural heritage. A mission city established in 1817, San Rafael values its history and the people and buildings that have shaped it. Many of San Rafael's older buildings remain today, adding an historic character and atmosphere to the City. The diversity of architecture offers a pleasing blend of new and old buildings of various types and styles. In 1986, the City completed the San Rafael Historical/Architectural Survey identifying and rating the architectural and historical significance of selected buildings and areas. Approximately 295 structures were listed and evaluated. High concentrations of historic buildings are located in Downtown, Gerstle Park and the Dominican neighborhoods. City policy has been to protect and build upon the historic character that exists in the City. The City adopted a Historic Preservation Ordinance in 1978. The ordinance established guidelines regarding remodeling or demolishing historic buildings. The ordinance is implemented by the Design Review Board and Planning Commission. See Exhibit 24 for a list of historical landmarks in San Rafael. 226 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CULTURE AND ARTS Amended 1/13/2016 In 2002, there were 63 known archeological sites The Boyd identified in the San Rafael Planning Area. These sites contain archaeological Gatehouse resources, which include deposits and remains left by the local Native Americans and currently houses other early inhabitants. These sites are located primarily at the base of hills on the the Marin History Museum, which perimeter of the San Pedro peninsula and in the Miller Creek area. These locations began construction likely offered fresh water. A portion of the Miller Creek School site served as a central of a new facility in village in the Gallinas Valley for at least 3,000 years. 2005. City policy protects known archeological resources to the maximum extent feasible. Generally, new development is required to avoid sites. The Community Development Department maintains an archaeological sensitivity database based on parcels and proximity to potentially sensitive sites. Data includes parcels that have been examined for archaeological remains, known archaeological sites, National, State, and local landmark locations, recognized historic building locations, and the archaeological sensitivity zones established by the data. If an archeological site is uncovered during construction, activity is halted and an examination is made by a qualified archeologist in consultation with the American Indian Council of Marin. Work can resume when appropriate mitigation measures are implemented. The City has also established an Ordinance that states procedures and regulations for archaeological resource protection. 226 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CULTURE AND ARTS Amended 1/13/2016 it ' "76146, W'F h� V z 7 1921 2071615 National Register of Historic Landmarks: Historic Places National State Local 15 Mission San Rafael ArchanaeI x 16 Mulberry Hou sry r 17 Robert Collar Estate x 18 Robert Collar House 19 San Rafael lnnpmvemen(,Abu x x 20 Schlosser/Gole7Chisolrr 21 Victorian Village Exhibit 24 F s.x ' aex Ear rix National, State, and Local Historical Landmarks San Rafael City Limit Planning Area CA 13. Historic Buildings and Areas. Preserve buildings and areas with special and recognized historic, architectural or aesthetic value including but not limited to those on the San Rafael Historical/Architectural Survey. New development and redevelopment should respect architecturally and historically significant buildings and areas. CA -13a. Inventory Update. Update the City's Historical/Architecture Survey, which is an inventory of buildings of architectural value, historic buildings and/or districts and historic elements such as signs, monuments and gates. Maximize the use of volunteers in updating the survey with professional assistance as needed. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Lone Termc'�m Resources: Staff Time, Volunteers, Grants CA -13b. Preservation Ordinance. Continue to implement the City's Historic Preservation Ordinance through the design review process. Update the City's Historic Preservation Ordinance and review the development application review procedures for the various classifications of buildings on the Historical Architecture Survey, including effective ways to review proposed changes to historic properties. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing. (Update: Short Term) Resources: Staff Time CA -13c. Historic Preservation Advisory Committee. Establish a technical advisory committee or contract with an architectural historian, to provide the Design Review Board and Planning Commission with advice in design matters and policies related to the preservation and/or modification of historic structures. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time, Fees CA -13d. Public Education. Encourage historic preservation activities and the formation of historic preservation groups in neighborhoods to heighten awareness of historic landmarks and how architecture and landscape define the character of an area. Encourage schools to incorporate units about local history into their school programs. Continue to support efforts to install plaques recognizing historic locations in San Rafael. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time CA -13e. Preservation Reference Materials. Maintain at Falkirk a special collection of preservation materials and resources. Enhance public awareness of the collection, and include a photographic record of local preservation efforts. Responsibility: Community Services Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time, Grants CA -13f. Public Events. Encourage organizations such as the Marin Historical Society to produce events, publications, and exhibits about the historic resources that exist in San Rafael. Responsibility: Community Services, Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time 228 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CULTURE AND ARTS Amended 1/13/2016 CA-13g.Public Recognition. Through the annual Design Awards program, publicly recognize property owners who have done an exceptional job of preserving an historical property. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time See PR -7b (Marin History Museum), LU -2a (Development Review), NH -29a (Implement Downtown Design Guidelines) and NH -32 (Historic Character). CA -14. Reuse of Historic Buildings. Encourage the adaptation and reuse of historic buildings, in order to preserve the historic resources that are a part of San Rafael's heritage. CA -14a. Historical Building Code. Use the State historical building code to encourage adaptive reuse of historic buildings. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Shaft Resources: Staff Time CA -14b. Zoning. Investigate possible zoning exemptions to regulations such as on-site parking, signs, and setbacks in order to encourage adaptive reuse. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time CA -14c. Incentives. Investigate the use of incentives such as transfer of development rights, easements, and property tax relief to encourage preservation of historic buildings. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time See CD -3c (Revisions to Design Guidelines), CD -10 (Nonresidential Design Guidelines), CD -1 la (Compatibility of Building Patterns), CD -12 (Industrial Areas), CD -13 (Single - Family Residential Design Guidelines), CD -4d (Design Guidelines) and S-99 (Seismic Safety of Existing Buildings). CA -15. Protection of Archaeological Resources. Recognize the importance of protecting significant archaeological resources by: • Identifying, when possible, archaeological resources and potential impacts on such resources. • Providing information and direction to property owners in order to make them aware of these resources. • Implementing measures to preserve and protect archaeological resources. CA -15a. Archeological Resources Ordinance. Continue to implement the existing Archeological Resources Ordinance. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CULTURE AND ARTS 229 Parks and Recreation Introduction The purpose of the Parks and Recreation Element is to identify and document present park facilities; compare those facilities with current and long-term needs; establish attainable goals to meet the community's recreation needs; and develop and adopt policies and programs that will accomplish those goals. Standards The criteria used to determine the size, type and location of parks and recreational facilities include: • Park acreage standards based on acreage per 1,000 residents. • Location standards based on the distance from a neighborhood to either a neighborhood or community park. • Neighborhood and Citywide recreational needs to coordinate park user characteristics with specific types of facilities. Assessment of San Rafael's Parks and Recreation Needs Despite an abundance of citywide and regional park and open space land in San Rafael, there are several neighborhoods inadequately served by local recreation facilities. Deficiencies may result from inadequate space, lack of variety of facilities provided, or distance to a park. In San Rafael, space options are limited and cannot be addressed by general standards. The Recreation policies, therefore, include a map and a needs assessment identifying potential areas for recreation improvements. Recreational programs and park facilities play a critical role in determining our quality of life. The City of San Rafael is committed to ongoing improvements to address the recreational needs of its residents. San Rafael has a number of new, recently improved and planned recreation facilities: Our Quality of Life • New soccer and baseball fields at Pickleweed Park; • Two softball fields and a new playground at Bernard Hoffman; • A renovated pool at the Terra Linda Recreation Center; • Renovated playgrounds at Santa Margarita, Gerstle and Bret Harte Parks; • Lighted baseball/softball fields at McInnis Park; • New sections of the Bay Trail network along the Jean and John Starkweather Shoreline Park; and • A new skate park at McInnis Park. Children love the new water feature at Freitas Park. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / PARKS AND RECREATION 231 Exhibit 25: Parks and Recreation Facilities in San Rafael N e i g h b o r h o o d Parks 1. Arbor Park - 0.3 acres 2. Bayside Mini Park - 0.1 acres 3. Beach Park - 0.4 acres 4. Bret Harte Park - 0.5 acres 5. Fred Jensen Park - 0.3 acres 6. Freitas Park - 3.5 acres 7. Hartzell Park - 0.4 acres 8. Hillview Park - 0.2 acres 9. Munson Park - 0.4 acres 10. Oleander Park - 2.0 acres 11. Peacock Gap Park - 7.0 acres 12. Los Ranchitos Park - 2.7 acres 13. Riviera Park - 2.6 acres 14. Russom Park - 7.0 acres 15. San Rafael City Plaza - 0.2 acres 16. Santa Margarita Park - 5.0 acres 17. Schoen Park - 0.1 acres 18. Sun Valley Park - 2.1 acres 19. Victor Jones Park - 7.0 acres Community Parks 20. Albert Park - 11.5 acres 21. Bernard Hoffman Field - 3.8 acres 22. Boyd Park - 42.0 acres 23. Gerstle Park - 6.0 acres 24. Pickleweed Park - 17.0 acres 25. Jean and John Starkweather Shoreline Park - 20.0 acres Community Centers 26. Pickleweed Community Center 27. San Rafael Community Center 28. Terra Linda Community Center San Rafael City School District 29. Bahia Vista Elementary School - 5.0 acres 30. Coleman Elementary School - 4.0 acres 31. Davidson Middle School - 15.3 acres 32. Gallinas Elementary School - 11.2 acres 33. Glenwood Elementary - 24.6 acres 34. Laurel Dell Elementary - 1.2 acres 35. McPhail Elementary School (closed) - 9.8 acres 36. Old Gallinas Elementary School - 7.8 acres 37. San Pedro Elementary - 7.3 acres 38. San Rafael High School - 29.7 acres 39. Short Elementary School - 1.0 acres 40. Sun Valley Elementary - 5.0 acres 41. Terra Linda High School - 30.2 acres D i x i e School District 42. Dixie Elementary School - 11.4 acres 43. Don Timoteo Elementary (leased to St. Mark's School) - 10.0 acres 44. Lucas Valley Elementary (closed) - 10.0 acres 45. Mary Silveira Elementary - 9.9 acres 46. Miller Creek Middle School - 17.0 acres 47. Santa Margarita (leased to Marindale School) - 11.0 acres 48. Vallecito Elementary - 25.0 acres 49. Nova Albion (Dixie School District Offices), Community Garden - 10.4 acres Marinwood Comm u n i t y S e r v i c e s D i s t r i c t 50. Gallinas Ave. Mini Park - 0.1 acres 51. Marinwood Community Center 52. Marinwood Park - 25.0 acres Lucas Valley Community Service Area 53. Lucas Valley Community Center - 2.0 acres Marin County 54. Adrian Rosel - 0.7 acres 55. Candy's Park - 1.5 acres 56. Castro Field - 1.5 acres 57. Marin Center - 20 acres 58. McInnis Park - 450 acres 59. McNear's Beach 55 acres 60. McPhail Playfield - 1.5 acres 61. Pueblo Park - 2.0 acres State Park 62. China Camp State Park - 1,640 acres 232 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / PARKS AND RECREATION Amended 1/13/2016 R Exhibit 26 f/Y !1Nl� Parks and Recreation Facilities, 2004 Existing Parks and Recreation Facilities T i i 0 S00 1000 1500 met" i 0� 1 INilas Looking Ahead The City of San Rafael faces the challenge of adapting and improving its parks and recreation resources to meet the changing needs and priorities of the community. Improvements to consider for the future are as follows: • Sport fields and facilities. • Community pool south of Puerto Suello Hill. • Park upgrades. • New recreation facilities in neighborhoods deficient in parks. • Recreation programs and facilities to meet the needs of an increasing senior population. This element addresses existing sites and possible future sites and opportunities for expanded recreational use. These include local school sites, private schools, county parks, and open space sites. Programs must be developed to address shared capital expense outlay and continuing maintenance costs. This is particularly important in light of past over -use and lack of maintenance resources that resulted in below standard recreational fields. To maintain the City's public parkland -to -population ratio, developers are expected to dedicate land consistent with the City's standard. Schools contribute an additional 150 acres of existing local recreation facilities, providing most of the City's organized sports facilities. School sites may also be the only remaining land in a neighborhood suitable for intensive recreation use. To maintain levels of recreation service, it is important that the City promote retention of key school recreation facilities, particularly as schools are sold or leased. The Parks and Recreation Element should be updated during the five-year General Plan review and amended to reflect evolving community recreational needs and resources. 234 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / PARKS AND RECREATION Amended 1/13/2016 GOAL 27: PARKS AND PROGRAMS FOR ALL It is the goal for San Rafael to have recreation facilities and programs, parks and playfields for all age groups throughout the community. San Rafael recognizes the essential nature of Parks and Recreational services to its residents. Numerous parks, public spaces, and playing fields are integral to the life of the City. Recreational facilities and playfield are well maintained and consistently upgraded. Attention to community need generates proposals for new facilities. Neighborhood and Community Park Standards and Needs PR -1. Standards. Maintain, and where possible exceed, a recreation standard of three acres of park and recreation facilities per 1,000 residents. PR -la. Recreation standard. Use the recreation standard when evaluating proposals for new parks. Consider the creation of neighborhood parks of less than three acres when it can be demonstrated that such a facility would satisfy an unmet neighborhood need, provide recreational value and be a sufficient size to support desired infrastructure. Responsibility: Community Services Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time, Grants, Fees and Dedications PR -2. Park Development Criteria. Use the following criteria as a guide to improving the park system: a. Neighborhood parks should serve populations of at least 3,000 within a radius of one-half mile, and have a minimum size of three acres. b. Community parks should serve a population of 10,000 to 30,000 within a radius of three to five miles, and have a size of 20 acres or more. PR -2a. Park Criteria. Use the park development criteria when evaluating proposals for new parks and park improvements. Responsibility: Community Services Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time, Grants, Fees PR -3. Neighborhood Recreational Needs. Serve all neighborhoods with neighborhood and/or community parks that meet the needs of the community. Priority areas should include Canal, Dominican, and Montecito neighborhoods. PR -3a. Neighborhood Recreational Needs. Develop individual park plans as opportunities become available, determining cost estimates and priorities. Responsibility: Community Services Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time, Grants Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / PARKS AND RECREATION 235 PR -3b. Parks and Recreation Commission Priorities. On a periodic basis, work with the Parks and Recreation Commission to recommend priorities for park improvements. Responsibility: Community Services Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time PR -4. City Recreational Needs. Provide opportunities for recreational activities for boys and girls, teens, and adults through the creation of additional facilities such as fields for active sports, a public pool south of Puerto Suello Hill, and a community Senior Center. PR -4a. All -Weather Fields. Provide cost-effective all-weather fields to optimize year- round use of community sports facilities. As fields are rebuilt, consider the feasibility of using year-round surfaces. Responsibility: Community Services Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time, Grants, Donations See also PR -1 lb (Public Pool) and PR -12a (Senior Facilities). PR -5. Review of Needs. Conduct a review of San Rafael's recreational, facility and program needs, as part of the five-year update of General Plan 2020, and amend policies as needed. PR -5a. Needs Survey. Prepare an updated citywide recreation needs survey to help provide direction for future park and program development. Responsibility: Community Services Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time, Grants San Rafael's parks have been improved for safety and accessibility. Parks and Recreational Facilities PR -6. Community Center Improvements. Upgrade or expand San Rafael's community centers to meet the passive and active recreational needs of the population. a. Pickleweed Community Center. Renovate and expand the facility according to the Pickleweed Expansion Plan (April, 2002). b. San Rafael Community Center. Complete implementation of the Albert Park Master Plan. c. Terra Linda Community Center. Prepare a site master plan addressing buildings and grounds. PR -6a. Community Center Improvements. Prepare plans, seek funding and improve community center facilities Responsibility: Community Services Timeframe: Short Term- Pickleweed and San Rafael Centers Long term -Terra Linda Center Resources: Staff Time, Grants, Donations 236 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / PARKS AND RECREATION Amended 1/13/2016 PR -7. Community Park Improvements. Upgrade San Rafael's community parks to meet the recreational needs of the served population. a. 163 d. Albert Park. Complete implementation of the park master plan with the addition of group picnic facilities, basketball court, water play feature and the Downtown Promenade (from Mahon Creek at Albert Park Lane to Andersen Drive with views of Mission San Rafael Archangel). Bernard Hoffman. Complete field improvements and restroom installation. Boyd Park. Implement the Boyd Park Master Plan (including History Museum). Explore uses for vacant parcel on Robert Dollar Drive adjacent to the Park. Gerstle Park. Prepare a master plan that addresses renovation and development needs. e. Pickleweed Park. Complete construction of the Jean and John Starkweather Shoreline Park around Pickleweed Park. f. Shoreline Park. Complete implementation of the Jean and John Starkweather Shoreline Park Master Plan, continuing to oversee the development of the privately- and publicly -owned sections of the park consistent with the San Rafael Shoreline Park Master Plan and the Shoreline Enhancement Plan. PR -8. Neighborhood Park Improvements. Upgrade San Rafael's neighborhood parks to meet the recreational needs of the served population. a. Beach Park. Prepare a master plan prior to expiration of the lease of adjacent City property to the San Rafael yacht Harbor. Consider possible expansion and improvements which would support the proposed Canal Waterway Vision. b. Bret Harte Park. Complete implementation of the Bret Harte Park Master Plan. Evaluate ways to improve access from the park into hillside open space land to the south to provide picnic and hiking opportunities. c. Freitas Park. Complete implementation of the Freitas Park Master Plan. Consider the sale of the northern parcel to provide funding for Freitas Park improvements. d. Munson Park. Improve the park consistent with the recommendations of the North San Rafael Vision Promenade Conceptual Plan. e. Peacock Gap Park. Update the Peacock Gap Park Master Plan as needed to improve trails and access to open space. f. Ranchitos Park. Build the park as part of approved subdivision improvements. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 1 PARKS AND RECREATION 237 Shoreline Park PR -7a. Community Park Improvements. Prepare plans, seek funding and improve has been community park facilities improved with Responsibility: Community Services grants from Timeframe: Short Term: Gerstle Park, Pickleweed Park and Shoreline A B A G a n d Park: Long Term: Albert Park, Bernard Hoffman, and Boyd Park partnerships Resources: Staff Time, Grants, Donations with t h e community. PR -7b. Marin History Museum. (Deleted) Support efforts by tho _^/ rA4_ Histcr, Asseeiation to the 14istefy Museum renovate and expand ­4;Ljcf 1` ikil J Ti f.. me. Sh r. Tor. Resources: Staff Time PR -8. Neighborhood Park Improvements. Upgrade San Rafael's neighborhood parks to meet the recreational needs of the served population. a. Beach Park. Prepare a master plan prior to expiration of the lease of adjacent City property to the San Rafael yacht Harbor. Consider possible expansion and improvements which would support the proposed Canal Waterway Vision. b. Bret Harte Park. Complete implementation of the Bret Harte Park Master Plan. Evaluate ways to improve access from the park into hillside open space land to the south to provide picnic and hiking opportunities. c. Freitas Park. Complete implementation of the Freitas Park Master Plan. Consider the sale of the northern parcel to provide funding for Freitas Park improvements. d. Munson Park. Improve the park consistent with the recommendations of the North San Rafael Vision Promenade Conceptual Plan. e. Peacock Gap Park. Update the Peacock Gap Park Master Plan as needed to improve trails and access to open space. f. Ranchitos Park. Build the park as part of approved subdivision improvements. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 1 PARKS AND RECREATION 237 g. Riviera Park. Improve playground equipment. h. Russom Park. Prepare a park master plan. i. Santa Margarita Park. Complete implementation of the Santa Margarita Park Master Plan. j. Schoen Park. Prepare a park master plan to finalize Shoreline Park link, and to provide appropriate recreation amenities. k. Sun Valley Park. Complete planned park improvements. The following parks require no further park improvements at this time. During the five-year General Plan review, they will be assessed to determine if the situation has changed: Bayside Mini Park Oleander Park Beach Park Terra Linda Park Hartzell Park Victor Jones Park PR -8a. Neighborhood Park Improvements. Prepare plans, seek funding and improve neighborhood park facilities. Encourage partnerships with neighborhood organizations and residents in projects to improve existing parks. Responsibility: Community Services Timeframe: Short Term: Bret Harte, Freitas, Ranchitos, Riviera, Santa Margarita, Schoen and Sun Valley/Long Term: Beach, Munson, Peacock Gap, and Russom Park Resources: Staff Time, Capital Improvements, Grants, Donations, and Partnerships. PR -9. New Parks. Provide additional park sites as identified below. Park sites should be in the service area and designed to meet the needs of the targeted population, giving priority to underserved neighborhoods. If sites are unavailable, consider alternative park sites that are within the vicinity of the service area. Encourage the development of new parks as follows: a. Bellam/Windward Way site. Prepare a park master plan that responds to the traffic and environmental constraints of the property. Explore passive and active recreational opportunities. Consider development on a portion of the site for private or public non -recreational use if it would benefit the neighborhood and provide funding for park improvements. b. Montecito/Happy Valley. Pursue opportunities to provide a neighborhood park. Encourage San Rafael High School or School District corporation yard to provide a neighborhood park with play facilities for toddlers and young children. Work with San Rafael City Schools to identify a potential park site. c. Dominican. Pursue opportunities to provide a neighborhood park and/or recreation facilities in Dominican/Black Canyon. For example, encourage Dominican University to provide a neighborhood park and/or access to recreational facilities. Work with Dominican University in conjunction with the future Master Plan to identify potential park and/or recreational facilities. d. Lincoln/San Rafael Hill. Pursue opportunities to provide a neighborhood park in the Lincoln/San Rafael Hill neighborhood. e. Unincorporated Areas. Encourage the County to provide on-site recreation facilities in new subdivisions due to their low-density character (i.e., lack of population to support additional public neighborhood park facilities) and the distance to existing neighborhood park and school facilities. 238 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / PARKS AND RECREATION Amended 1/13/2016 PR -9a. New Parks. Prepare plans, seek funding and create new neighborhood park facilities. Responsibility: Community Services Timeframe: Ongoing: Unincorporated areas/Long Term: Montecito/Happy Valley and Dominican Resources: Staff Time, Grants, Donations See NH -62 (Park and Recreation) and NH -124 (Improved Recreation). PR -10. Onsite Recreation Facilities. Require onsite recreation facilities in new multifamily residential projects and encourage construction of onsite recreation facilities in existing multifamily residential projects, where appropriate. PR -10a. Onsite Recreation Facilities. Continue to implement zoning regulations to require appropriate recreational facilities. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees PR -11. Public Pools. Address the need for more public pools south of Puerto Suello Hill in San Rafael. PR -11a. High School and University Pools. (Deleted) useafpaalsat Awa highx_Mh3ols and at Dein ..;,.a U-ni:,ef4t., PR -11b. Public Pool. Explore opportunities to construct a year-round pool in central San Rafael. Responsibility: Community Services Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time, Grants, Donations PR -12. Senior Recreational Facilities. Provide dedicated facilities for senior recreational activities. PR -12a. Senior Facilities. Identify a site(s) and seek funding for senior recreational facilities. Responsibility: Community Services Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time, Grants, Donations See PR -4. (City Recreational Needs). The Terra Linda pool was renovated in 2002. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / PARKS AND RECREATION 239 PR -13. Commercial Recreation. Encourage private sector development of commercial recreational facilities to serve community needs by: a. Permitting compatible commercial concessions at community and regional parks to provide sources of funding for public parks. b. Encouraging major employers to provide for the recreational needs of their employees on site or in conjunction with City recreation facilities or programs. c. Encouraging commercial recreational facilities open to the general public. PR -13a. Commercial Recreation. Consider amending the zoning ordinance to allow a floor area ratio exemption for on-site recreational facilities open to the public. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time PR -14. Amateur Multi -sport Athletic Fields. Strive for the development of publicly or privately funded, large multi -sport athletic field clusters to address the needs of the community. PR -14a. Athletic Fields. Explore opportunities to construct multi -sport athletic fields in San Rafael. Responsibility: Community Services Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time, Grants PR -15. Downtown Recreation. Encourage the creation of recreational facilities and gathering places open to the public, such as plazas, green spaces, and unexpected places such as the alley improvements behind Art Works Downtown. See LU -2a (Development Review). PR -16. Community Gardens. Continue to support and maintain community gardens and look for ways to sustain the gardens. PR -16a. Community Gardens. (Revised as SU -8c. Communitv Garden Standards) Why poay.blc� oneourage eff rts 1.., community groups o w�- &Iizh oonwmmity gara�^� s T�mzffafaei Shaft Te , GFants PR -17. Park Design. Design recreation facilities to be safe, attractive and easy -to -maintain in order to minimize conflicts with surrounding neighborhoods and to protect sensitive natural resource areas. PR -17a. Park Plan Review. Work with qualified landscape architects, the Design Review Board, the Parks and Recreation Commission, and the Planning Commission when preparing and reviewing park master plans and designing park improvements. Review park plans and projects similar to the level of design review required of privately developed recreational facilities. Responsibility: Community Services, Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time 240 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / PARKS AND RECREATION Amended 1/13/2016 PR -18. Community Involvement in Park Planning. Encourage and facilitate the participation of residents, sports groups and civic organizations in park planning and design. PR -18a. Community Involvement. Work with park neighbors, user groups, civic organizations and neighborhood associations when preparing park master plans and designing park improvements. Responsibility: Community Services Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time, Grants PR -19. Park Maintenance. Maintain public recreation facilities and parks. See I -la (Capital Improvement Programming) Coordination with School Districts and Other Agencies and Jurisdictions PR -20. School Site Recreation Facilities. Attempt to secure the continued public use of recreational facilities at schools that are closed, or that could be closed during the time of the plan. Refer to Appendix D for recreation facilities on school sites and acreage to retain. PR -20a. Preservation of School Recreation Facilities. Allow clustering of development in order to preserve recreation facilities at surplused school sites. Responsibility: City Manager, Community Services Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time N a y I o r A c t Education Code §39363.5 requires that whenever surplus school land is sold, the first priority is given for parks and recreation purposes. Naylor legislation (Education Code §39390 et seq.) requires that school districts first offer land for sale to public agencies. Through this legislation, the City may purchase certain outdoor school recreation lands at reduced prices. The City must adopt a plan designating portions of land proposed for recreation open space purchase. Purchase is generally a last option if other methods of recreation facility retention are inadequate. The Naylor legislation is helpful in retaining school recreation facilities but is limited in scope. School gyms, multipurpose rooms, and the City's child care programs are also desirable to retain but do not qualify for purchase under Naylor legislation which limits purchases to land which is used for school playground, playing field or other outdoor recreation purposes and open space land particularly suited for recreational purposes. Bernard Hoffman Park was acquired by the City through the Naylor Act provisions. PR -20b. School Site Recreational Facilities. When a school site is proposed to be sold, designate a School Liaison Committee composed of two City Council and two School Board members to identify ways to acquire recreation facilities on the school site, after consultations with affected community and neighborhood residents, appropriate staff and advisory committees. Responsibility: City Manager, Community Services Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time PR -21. City -School Cooperation. Memorialize cooperation efforts between the City and school districts for the joint development, maintenance, and use of school facilities for educational programs, park development, and recreational use. See G -15a (Joint Use of Educational Facilities). Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 1 PARKS AND RECREATION 241 PR -22. Relationship to Other Public Agencies. Cooperate with Marin County and the State to coordinate the use and management of facilities and programs on City, County and State park lands. PR -22a. Cooperative Ventures. Maximize opportunities to expand recreational facilities and increase recreational programming through cooperative ventures with the State and County. Responsibility: Community Services Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time, Grants, Donations Financing Parks and Recreation PR -23. Funding. Establish and maintain a public and private funding program for park and recreation facilities development and maintenance. PR -23a. Funding. Seek new and ongoing sources of funds for park development and maintenance. Pursue private donation and dedications, Federal, State and other grant sources, use of assessment districts, public/private joint ventures and all other available means to implement park and recreation policies. Sources of funding include user fees, the Capital Improvements program, Friends of San Rafael for specific parks, private foundations, and the Parkland Dedication Ordinance. Encourage the dedication of land for parks, as well as monetary contributions and gifts -in-kind for facilities and programs. Consider naming park facilities in exchange for significant donations to an ongoing maintenance fund. Responsibility: Community Services Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time Quimby Act Section 66477 of the California Government Code provides local jurisdictions with the authority to acquire parklands in association with new residential land divisions. Commonly referred to as the Quimby Act, this provision of state law allows a city, by ordinance, to require the dedication of land, payment of an in -lieu fee, or a combination of both, for park and recreational purposes as a condition for approving a subdivision map. PR -24. Contributions by Rental Residential Development. Explore the feasibility of requiring contributions from rental residential development towards park improvements. PR -24a. Rental Residential Contributions. Evaluate the feasibility of adopting an ordinance to require developers of apartments to contribute to park improvements. Responsibility: Community Services, City Attorney Timeframe: Short TermOngoing Resources: Staff Time PR -25. Contributions by Ownership Residential Development. Require developers of new residential housing to provide for the recreational needs of future residents of that development in accordance with Recreation Element standards and Quimby Act Subdivision Parkland Dedication Requirements. Needs would be satisfied by the dedication of land and development of recreation facilities to serve the new residents. In -lieu fees will be required if a finding is made that dedication and development of parkland is not a feasible or appropriate option. 242 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / PARKS AND RECREATION Amended 1/13/2016 PR -25a. Parkland Dedication Ordinance. Maintain and update as necessary the Parkland Dedication Ordinance Responsibility: Community Services, City Attorney Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time PR -26. Sale, Lease or Contractual Agreements. Provide that funds from the sale of City parks or open space shall be used for park or open space acquisition or improvements. Provide that funds from the lease of, or through contractual agreements involving, City parks or open space shall be used for capital improvements, or operation and maintenance costs. PR -26a. Use of Funds from Sale of City Parks or Open Space. With the sale of parks or open space, ensure that the funds are used appropriately for park or open space acquisition or improvements, or that lease revenue is used for improvements, operations or maintenance. Responsibility: Community Services Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time Recreational Programs PR -27. Recreational Programs for Changing Community Needs. Continually adapt recreational programs to meet changing community needs and interests. PR -27a. Recreational Programs. As part of seasonal program planning, monitor, evaluate and develop appropriate recreational programs for the community. Responsibility: Community Services Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time PR -28. Summer Recreation Programs. Provide summer recreation programs at locations convenient to each neighborhood. PR -28a. Summer Programs. Offer summer youth recreational programs at the Community Centers and other appropriate venues. Responsibility: Community Services Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees, Grants, Donations, Staff Time Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / PARKS AND RECREATION 243 Safety Introduction The Safety portion of the General Plan is aimed at reducing potential risk of death, injuries, damage to property, and the economic and social dislocation resulting from fire, flood, and geologic hazards, and other public health and safety hazards. The General Plan provides policies and standards for the type, location, intensity and design of development in areas of potential hazards. The intent is not to remove all risks associated with each specific type of hazard, but to reduce risks to life and property and to make informed decisions about land use and development near these hazards. Our Quality of Life San Rafael police at work on Fourth Street. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / SAFETY 245 GOAL 28: A SAFE COMMUNITY It is the goal of San Rafael, as the first priority for city government, to provide excellent fire, public safety and paramedic services and to be prepared in the case of disaster or emergency. San Rafael residents deserve to feel safe and secure wherever they live, work and play. General S-1. Location of Future Development. Permit development only in those areas where potential danger to the health, safety, and welfare of the residents of the community can be adequately mitigated. S -la. Entitlement Process. Through the entitlement process, evaluate applications for geoseismic and hazardous materials dangers and require appropriate mitigations. Responsibility: Community Development, Fire Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees S-2. Location of Public Improvements. Avoid locating public improvements and utilities in areas with identified flood, geologic and/or soil hazards to avoid any extraordinary maintenance and operating expenses. When the location of public improvements and utilities in such areas cannot be avoided, effective mitigation measures will be implemented. See S -la (Entitlement Process). S-3. Use of Hazard Maps in Development Review. Review Slope Stability, Seismic Hazard, and Flood Hazard Maps at the time a development is proposed. Undertake appropriate studies to assure identification and implementation of mitigation measures for identified hazards. See S -la (Entitlement Process). 246 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / SAFETY Amended 1/13/2016 Geologic and Seismic Safety Significant geologic and seismic hazards that exist within the San Rafael Planning Area include earthquakes, liquefaction, flow failures, lateral spreading, lurching, differential settlement, landslides, mudslides, subsidence and expansive soil. These hazards have the potential to damage or destroy residences, streets and utilities. Certain geologic hazards, such as liquefaction, expansive soils or small landslides, may be reduced or eliminated through engineering solutions such as special foundations or slide repair. In some instances, an engineering solution may not be economically feasible, and avoidance of the hazard may be the best way to assure public health and safety. High occupancy and emergency response facilities may not be appropriate in areas of high seismic or geologic hazard. Geologic and seismic hazards should be considered in planning the location, design, intensity, density and type of land uses in a given area. Long term costs to the City, such as maintenance, liability exposure and emergency services, are potentially greater where high hazards exist. S-4. Geotechnical Review. Continue to require geotechnical investigations for development proposals as set forth in the City's Geotechnical Review Matrix (Appendix F). Such studies should determine the actual extent of geotechnical hazards, optimum design for structures, the advisability of special structural requirements, and the feasibility and desirability of a proposed facility in a specified location. S -4a. Geotechnical Review of Proposed Development. Require soils and geologic peer review of development proposals in accordance with the Geotechnical Review Matrix to assess such hazards as potential seismic hazards, liquefaction, landsliding, mudsliding, erosion, sedimentation and settlement in order to determine if these hazards can be adequately mitigated. Levels of exposure to seismic risk for land uses and structures are also outlined in the Geotechnical Review Matrix, which shall be considered in conjunction with development review. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees S -4b. Geotechnical Review Matrix. Periodically review and update the Geotechnical Review Matrix, which describes procedures for site-specific investigations for projects being reviewed according to proposed occupancy, type and hazard zone(s) within which the site is located. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time S-5. Minimize Potential Effects of Geological Hazards. Development proposed within areas of potential geological hazards shall not be endangered by, nor contribute to, the hazardous conditions on the site or on adjoining properties. Development in areas subject to soils and geologic hazards shall incorporate adequate mitigation measures. The City will only approve new development in areas of identified hazard if such hazard can be appropriately mitigated. See LU -2a (Development Review). Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / SAFETY 247 S-6. Seismic Safety of New Buildings. Design and construct all new buildings to resist stresses produced by earthquakes. The minimum level of seismic design shall be in accordance with the most recently adopted building code as required by State law. S -6a. Seismic Design. The minimum seismic design of structures should be in accordance with the building code, as adopted in accordance with State law. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Permit Fee See CA -14a (Historic Building Codes). S-7. Minimize Potential Effects of Landslides. Development proposed in areas with existing landslides or with the potential for landslides (as identified by a registered engineering geologist or geotechnical engineer) shall not be endangered by, nor contribute to, the hazardous conditions on the site or on adjoining properties. Development in areas subject to landslide hazards shall incorporate adequate mitigation measures that have a design factor of safety of at least 1.5 for static conditions and 1.0 for pseudo -static (earthquake) conditions. The landslide mitigation should consider multiple options in order to reduce the secondary impacts (loss of vegetation, site grading, traffic, visual) associated with landslide mitigation. The City will only approve new development in areas of identified landslide hazard if such hazard can be appropriately mitigated. See S -4a (Geotechnical Review of Proposed Development). S-8. Seismic Safety of Existing Buildings. Encourage the rehabilitation or elimination of structures susceptible to collapse or failure in an earthquake. Historic buildings shall be treated in accordance with the Historic Preservation Ordinance. S -8a. Seismic Safety Building Reinforcement. Enforce State and local requirements for reinforcement of existing buildings. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time See CA -14c (Incentives). S-9. Post Earthquake Inspections. Require post -earthquake building inspections of critical facilities, and restrict entry into compromised structures. Inspections shall be conducted when the earthquake intensity if VII or higher per the Modified Mercalli Intensity Scale. Require inspections as necessary in conjunction with other non -city public agencies and private parties for structural integrity of water storage facilities, storm drainage structures, electrical transmission lines, major roadways, bridges, elevated freeways, levees, canal banks, and other important utilities and essential facilities. S -9a. Inspection List. Identify a list of facilities that would be inspected after a major earthquake. The list shall identify City -owned essential or hazardous facilities as defined by Category 1 and 2 of Table 16-K of the Uniform Building Code, and shall prioritize the list for inspection scheduling purposes in case of an earthquake. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Short term Resources: Staff time 248 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / SAFETY Amended 1/13/2016 mama nor ce.:ei say s� Exhibit 27 Geology and Stability Surficial Deposits 0 Qaf Artificial fill ® Qal Alluvial deposits 0 Qls Landslide deposits ® Qmf Arunciai Tm over marine and marsh deposits Tertiary overlap sequence = Tsv Sonoma Volcanics Franciscan Complex 0 Jfgs Greenstone 0 Jfmch Metachert 0 Jfmgc Metagreenstone and Chert 0 Jfmgs Met, , ...: a1- 0 KJfch Chert 0 KJfm Metamorphic Kfch Chert 0 Kfs Sandstone 0 fsr Melange 0 sc Silica -carbonate 0 sp Serpentinite Soerce' USGS. 21)(19; map file MF2337 NOM spatial resolution of anginal map data is 1:82.500. :'his map Is Intended to he of general use to engineers ind land -use planners. However, its small scale loss not provide sufficlent detail for site development ,urposse. in addition, this map does not take the place of ault-rupture hazard zones designated by the :anfomla State Geologist (Han and Bryant, f9s7�. :or a mom complete depiction of landslide Ilstri6utkm, see Nilsen and others (1979(, Ellen and others (1989; 1997), Plke(1997), end Wentworth ind others (1937). FAULT UBCDESL'R4ZTONQ.1 CAPABLE OF LARGE O\ MAGNITUDE MAGNITUDE EARTHQUAKES Q' AND # HIGH RATE OF SEISMIC ACTIVITY CAPABLE OF LARGE MAGNITUDE EARTHQUAKES OR HIGH RATE OF SEISMIC ACTIVITY PROBABILISTIC LEGEND (0 %) - PROBABILITY OF MAGNITUDE 8.7 OR GREATER EARTHQUAKE, 2400 TO 2030 COMBINED FAULT SYSTEM PROBABILITIES SAN ANDREAS = 21% HAYWARD-RODGERS CREEK = 32% CALAVERAS =18% ,\ oi�vZ a tr NOTES: GV = GREAT VALLEY APPmcWTE S T =THRUST FAULT t� ALL COUNTIES SHOWN ON MAP o +9 aR w N LES ARE IN SEISMIC ZONE 4 REFERENCES: o is 88 80 RLOMEM B I} MAPS OF K140M ACTIVE FAULT NEAR$OURCE ZONES IN CALIFORNIA, CDMG/SEAOCIICBO, FEBRUARY 1998 2 DATABASE OF POTENTIAL SOURCES FOR EARTHQUAKES LARGER THAN MAG. 6 IN N. CALIFORNIA, USGS OFR 96-745, 1996 3 EARTHQUAKE PROBABILITIES IN THE S.F. BAY REGION, 2000 - 2030, USGS OFR W517.1909 Tule base mep was tla Aopetl pmra�iy for GenPlat usage. The Clty of Sen " Rafael Is fel reePma@a9 nar Mable for use beyvritl � ntatlatl Puepoae. Exhibit 28 Active Regional Faults Hazardous Materials Hazardous materials exist in San Rafael because they are used by businesses, transported on highways and streets, and are present in small quantities in private homes in the form of solvents, cleaning fluids and other substances. Although there are no hazardous waste (Class 1) landfill sites in Marin County, such materials may be present in the Planning Area due to historic industrial uses, the types of material used to fill low lying sites for development, or due to materials deposited in dump sites prior to current regulations governing sanitary landfills. Being in the vicinity of sites with hazardous materials is an everyday experience for residents; they may be exposed through various ways including personal use and handling of hazardous materials, excavation of contaminated sites, and improperly disposed hazardous materials. The City of San Rafael is authorized by the California State Environmental Protection Agency as a Geeselidated Certified Unified Program Agency (CUPA) for the administration, regulation, and enforcement of environmental programs that fall under the CUPA umbrella. The Fire Hazardeus Materials Dlvosie-n manages these CUPA provides oversiaht on hazardous materials manaaement and enforces State environmental voarams at the local and reaional level. CUPA collaborates with other reaulatory aaencies in the manaaement of identified hazards to ensure safetv standards are " C U P A " The Unified Program (UP) was created by Senate Bill 1082 (1993) to consolidate, coordinate, and make consistent the administrative requirements, permits, inspections, and enforcement activities for the following environmental and emergency management programs: • Hazardous Materials Release Response Plans and Inventories (Business Plans) • California Accidental Release Prevention (CaIARP) Program • Underground Storage Tank Program • Aboveground Petroleum Storage Act Requirements for Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasure (SPCC) Plans • Hazardous Waste Generator and Onsite Hazardous Waste Treatment (tiered permitting) Programs • California Uniform Fire Code: Hazardous Material Management Plans and Hazardous Material Inventory Statements The Unified Program is intended to provide relief to businesses complying with the overlapping and sometimes conflicting requirements of formerly independently managed programs. The Unified Program is implemented at the local government level by a Certified Unified Program Agency (CUPA). met. The l&L\9 P:2\cgl Core Denai4m :n+ m&\,nWnc detailedfiles „f , f.\9:QmnO9 site charas+erica+irons rta+chase ref I In.Jer.. r.,Ynr! Cterane T�n WminOqd Vis, and a work+nd&lf-�c�e of current facilities with hnznrdeY6-,ata iolc. In odd a'! Leaking Underground nd Storage Tankcan+aminat9d sites 'nfnrm at'nn is listed and updated on the State GeoTracker database The San Rafael Fire Department manges the Marin Household Hazardous Waste (HHW) Proqram for most cities in Marin Countv. The Fire Department, together with Marin ReGyGling Center operates a permanent househeld hazardous v.faste far.ility-a�s- a joint program i.yith the City of San Rafael and the Marin County Hazardous and Solid Waste MaRagemeRt Joint Powers Authority (Zero Waste Marin) and Marin Recvclinq & Resource Recovery Association. operate the Marin HHW Facilitv. Residents of San Rafael may bring paint, adhesives, motor oil, pesticides, household batteries, latex Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / SAFETY 251 paint, computer monitors, televisions, and bleach cleaners to the facility free of charge. The Fire Department also assists businesses in determinina actions needed to comply with State and Federal laws reaardino storaoe and handlino of hazardous materials on site. San Rafael businesses may dispose of small quantities of hazardous waste by appointment and for a fee. The Ciro Dep ont's Materials D'v's'en adminiotoro this pry 2'552 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / SAFETY Amended 1/13/2016 S-10. Location of Public Improvements. To minimize threat to human health or any extraordinary construction and monitoring expenses, avoid locating improvements and utilities in areas with dangerous levels of identified hazardous materials. When the location of public improvements and utilities in such areas cannot feasibly be avoided, effective mitigation measures will be implemented. See LU -2a (Development Review). S-11. Restriction of Businesses. Restrict siting of businesses or expansion of businesses that have the potential for a significant hazardous materials release within one- quarter mile of schools. S -11a. Survey of Facilities. Survey existing industrial facilities within one-quarter mile of the schools. The survey would be used to determine the presence of hazardous materials and evaluate the risk of an accidental release that could adversely affect the health and safety of students and school staff. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Short term Resources: Staff time S-12. Use of Environmental Databases in Development Review. Review o Ern liafo Dcrwrkiismt 2; tifne-a When development is proposed, determine whether the site has been recorded as contaminated. Undertake appropriate studies to assure identification and implementation of mitigation measures for sites on or near identified hazards. inn Rafts Fire CUPA is responsible for the safe disposal of Responsibility: F-ireCUPA Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time S -12a. Environmental Database. Maintain environmental and hazardous materials - related databases, and update information on an ongoing basis. In addition, include the information in the State GeoTracker database (database of contaminated Underground Storage Tanks sites). Responsibility: F4feCUPA Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time S -12b. Environmental History. Through the environmental review process, provide information about available environmental history of a site and proposed mitigation measures if warranted. S-13. Potential Hazardous Soils Conditions. Where development is proposed on sites with known previous contamination, sites filled prior to 1974 or sites that were historically auto service, industrial or other land uses that may have involved hazardous materials, evaluate such sites for the presence of toxic or hazardous materials. The requirements for site-specific investigation are contained in the Geotechnical Review Matrix. S -13a. Potentially Hazardous Soils Map. Using the San Rafael o ea4a! database develep-Prepare a map showing sites with known soil and groundwater contamination.. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL2020/SAFETY 253 Pfepafe , „ to be ,. ..hale to the G..r..r....r.:ty Peyel,.r.. efA Tlupaftr eat in order to identify new developments that warrant environmental investigation and testing. Responsibility: F4-FeCUPA Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time S -13b. Hazardous Soils Cleanup. Require rem regional and local standards in order to develop c impacted soil or groundwater. At a minimum, remediation and clean up of contaminated sites shall be in accordance with regional and local standards. The required level of remediation and clean-up shall be determined by the Certified Unified Program Agencv (CUPA) Fire Bepartme ased on the intended use of the site and health risk to the public. Responsibility: F-ireCUPA Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time S -13c. Local Implementing Agency. As the &w Fyiw-aica Regional Water- Quality Divisier>The Certified Unified Program AgencX CUPA shall oversee the investigation and closure of contaminated underground storage tank sites. Responsibility: Fire BepaftmentCUPA Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time -diation and cleanup in accordance with in sites where hazardous materials have S e t t l e m e n t Settlement occurs from structures and other loads that cause deformation of the subsurface soils. Settlement from structures is usually minor and usually occurs during construction or within the first few weeks after construction. However, it can occur up to 30 years following construction. Consolidation of the San Francisco Bay mud can result in significant settlement of the ground surface. Bay mud underlies the eastern portion of San Rafael. San Rafael's filled areas continue to consolidate and settle causing a variety of problems for property users and the City alike. S-14. Hazardous Materials Storage, Use and Disposal. Enforce regulations regarding proper storage, use and disposal of hazardous materials to prevent leakage, potential explosions, fires, or the escape of harmful gases, and to prevent individually innocuous materials from combining to form hazardous substances, especially at the time of disposal. S -14a. CUPA Program. Continue to participate in the Certified Unified Program Agencv (CUPA) program. Responsibility: FireCity Manager Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time, Fees S-15. Hazardous Waste Management. Support measures to responsibly manage hazardous waste consistent with protection of the public health, welfare, safety and the environment. The City of San Rafael supports the Marin County Hazardous Waste Management Plan as adopted by the State, County and Cities within Marin County. See S -14a (CUPA Program). S-16. Transportation of Hazardous Materials. Enforce Federal, State and Local requirements and standards regarding the transportation of hazardous materials. Support, as appropriate, legislation that strengthens safety requirements for the transportation of hazardous materials. 254 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / SAFETY Amended 1/13/2016 S -16a. Safe Transport of Hazardous Materials. Support California Highway Patrol's efforts to ensure the safe transport of hazardous materials. Responsibility: Fire, Police, CUPA Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / SAFETY 255 Flood Control, Subsidence and Erosion Once the San Rafael Basin storm drain improvement projects are completed, they will nearly achieve the flood protection objectives set by the Department of Public Works over the last 50 years. However, subsidence of the areas underlain with bay mud will continue for several decades. Subsidence or settlement may result in flooding as ground levels are lowered. Without levee maintenance, flooding poses a serious threat to the east San Rafael area. Title 18 "Protection of Flood Hazard Areas" of San Rafael Municipal Code establishes standards and regulations governing development in flood -prone sites. Sandy soils on moderate to steep slopes or clayey soils on steep slopes are susceptible to erosion when exposed to concentrated surface water flow. The potential for erosion is increased when established vegetation is disturbed or removed. Within the valley areas, stream and river flow erodes the banks and causes the location of the stream or river to meander. The erosion undercuts the stream banks and leads to slope instability. The natural erosion and stream meander can undermine structures or roadways and cause damage or collapse. The potential for erosion damage is limited to localized areas. S-17. Flood Protection of New Development. Design new development within the bay mud areas to minimum floor elevation that provides protection from potential impacts of flooding during the "100 -year" flood. The final floor elevation (elevation of the first floor at completion of construction) shall account for the ultimate settlement of the site due to consolidation of the bay mud from existing and new loads, taking into account soils conditions and the type of structure proposed. Design for settlement over a 50 -year period is typically considered sufficient. Funding from storm drain improvements come from the General Fund, Nand Federal and State grants. S -17a. Title 18 Flood Protection Standards. Evaluate and revise the City's Title 18 flood protection standards for new development based on Federal and regional criteria. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees See LU -2a (Development Review). S-18 Storm Drainage Improvements. Require new development to improve local storm drainage facilities to accommodate site runoff anticipated from a "100 -year" storm. S -18a. Storm Drainage Improvements. Require that new development proposals which are likely to affect the limited capacity of downstream storm drainage facilities provide a hydrological analysis of the storm drain basin of the proposed development and evaluate the capacity of existing downstream storm drainage facilities and fund improvements to accommodate increased drainage from the project site resulting from a 100 -year storm, where practical. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees 256 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / SAFETY Amended 1/13/2016 Thm Asa —pr ca doped dna h W G-1Plan usage. The Gity Sm M Snataal Isiwt resporeible r II®Me kr use beyond IW IN—W purpose. Exhibit 29 Flood Hazard -- ---- Areas S a n P a b! o B a y Q San Ra fa e! Bay Area of the 100 Year Flood FAreas Between Limits of the 100 Year Flood and the 500 Year Flood This map is based upon the 1995 release of FEMNs digital O3 Flood Data product and Is a digital representaion of certain features of FEKWs FIRM product. Other areas of localized flooding not identified by the Federal Emergency Management Agency may also occur within the Planning Area. This map does not indicate changes effected by Letters of Map Revision (LOMR). 0 500 1000 1600 Maters 0 , Miles S-19. Flood Control Improvements Funding. Support Federal and State legislation that provide funding for the construction of flood control improvements in urbanized areas, and seek such funding as it becomes available. Additionally, continue to use any available local sources of funding to provide flood control improvements. S -19a. Incremental Flood Control Improvements. Where needed and possible, new development/redevelopment projects shall include measures to improve area flood protection. Such measures would be identified and required through the development review process. Responsibility: Community Development, Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees S-20. Levee Upgrading. When waterfront properties are developed or redeveloped, require levee upgrading, as appropriate, based on anticipated high tide and flood conditions, to maintain an appropriate levee height. S -20a. Levee Maintenance Funding. Coordinate with property owners to ensure adequate levee heights. Evaluate potential ways for affected private property owners to fund levee maintenance such as Assessment or Maintenance Districts. Responsibility: Public Works Department Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: CIP, Federal funds (FEMA for emergency repairs), Mitigation Funds, Assessment District. S -20b. Ground Elevation Surveys. Perform periodic ground elevation surveys within the Canal Neighborhood to determine ground elevations throughout the area, including the levee system. The result of the survey shall be used to determine the need for levee heightening for flood protection purposes. When a need for levee heightening is determined, the City shall heighten the levees as necessary on public property and require that levees on private property be heightened. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff time See LU -2a (Development Review). S-21. Rise in Sea Level. Geer-dinate a response to petefAial rise iii aca!,ovel with leeal, r-egienal, state, and federaagenl 00. -1X�7 to levee heightening for- 41,.,.,7 „fin rUrros pAaet th lntefgovemmefAal Panel E)a Climate Change regarding the ME)st eUffefA estifPA4es Of ea level rise.- Support efforts to address rise in sea level by: a) continually monitoring chances in proiection information. data and technolo2v: b) utilizins the "Climate Adaptation — Sea Level Rise" San Rafael White Paper (January 2014) as a starting point for pursuing critical tasks and actions including the preparation of a vulnerability_ assessment: and c) coordinatins with the County of Marin and other local, state, federal agencies in planning for lone -term adaptation. C 21a. Rise in Sea Level. Review ♦l.c-ri00 iT:�e" level information 4:,mix1.0.7 by Fede,..,1 Resp nsiba:ty: Puhlio Wer" Tkv-��ffamei Ongoing Resaufees: Federal Pands (FEMA) 258 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / SAFETY Amended 1/13/2016 S -21a. Local Hazard Mitivation Plan. Prepare and adopt a local/multi-hazard mitieation Dlan. which includes addressine rise in sea level and measures for disaster DreDaredness and adaptation. Responsibility: Fire De_Dartment Timeframe: Short-term Resources: Staff time: available Brants S -21b. Vulnerabilitv Assessment- BavWAVE ProEram. Coordinate and work with the Countv of Marin and other local jurisdictions in the BavWAVE Program to DreDare and adopt a vulnerabilitv assessment of the bav shoreline and areas susceptible to rise in sea level. Responsibility: Public Works and Communitv Development Timeframe: Short-term Resources: Staff time S-22. Erosion. Require appropriate control measures in areas susceptible to erosion, in conjunction with proposed development. Erosion control measures and management practices should conform to the most recent editions of the Regional Water Quality Control Board's Erosion and Sediment Control Field Manual and the Association of Bay Area Governments' Manual of Standards for Erosion and Sediment Control or equivalent. S -22a. Erosion Control Programs. Review and approve erosion control programs for projects involving grading one acre or more or 5,000 square feet of built surface as required by Standard Urban Stormwater Management Plans (SUSUMP). Evaluate smaller projects on a case-by-case basis. Responsibility: Public Works, Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees S -22b. Grading During the Wet Season. Discourage grading during the wet season and require that development projects implement adequate erosion and/or sediment control and runoff discharge measures. Responsibility: Public Works, Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Clean Water Program S-23. Septic Systems. Discourage the use of septic systems within San Rafael's Planning Area. If no other alternatives exist, then soil tests shall be required to determine if the on-site soils are suitable for development of a septic system for disposal of wastewater. In hillside areas, an evaluation of the additional water from a septic system on hillside stability shall also be required. New or improved septic systems shall be designed by a registered civil engineer that specializes in septic design. See LU -2a (Development Review). S-24. Creeks and Drainageways. Seek to retain creek channels in their natural state in order to prevent undue erosion of creek banks. Protect creekside habitat and provide maintenance access along creeks where appropriate. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / SAFETY 259 S -24a. Agency Permits. Through development review, consult with and require necessary permits from State and Federal resource agencies, such as U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, California Fish and Game, Bay Conservation and Development Commission, and the Regional Water Quality Control Board. Responsibility: Community Development, Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees See CON -6a (Municipal Code Compliance) and CON -8a (Creek Restoration). S-25. Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB) Requirements Continue to work through the Marin County Stormwater Pollution Prevention Program to implement appropriate Watershed Management plans as dictated in the RWQCB general National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit for Marin County and the local stormwater plan. S -25a. Compliance with RWQCB. Review development plans for compliance with RWQCB permit, in conjunction with Marin County Stormwater Pollution Prevention Program (MCSTOPP). Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Stormwater funds, Fees Public Safety and Emergency Response Police Department The mission of the San Rafael Police Department is to provide police services to the community, and to reduce crime and the fear of crime through the development of partnerships with the community it serves and other public and private agencies through the utilization of all available resources. Reductions in crime since 1988 have resulted from several proactive policing programs. • Participation in the interdepartmental Health and Safety Coordinating Committee, with joint inspection teams investigating the health and safety conditions in San Rafael's residences. • Creation of the award winning Mental Health Liaison Program, which is instrumental in assisting mentally -ill homeless who are repeat criminal violators to receive the treatment they need to live a crime -free life. • Partnership with social service agencies to investigate the criminal aspect of criminal violence, while other agencies provide advocacy for victims of domestic violence and counseling for anger management. • Neighborhood outreach to community groups to improve traffic safety and reduce traffic accidents through monitoring and reducing speeding on local streets, and participating in Public Works' Traffic Coordinating Committee to identify and reduce neighborhood traffic problems. • Improved School Liaison Program to reduce and prevent crimes on school campuses. • Continued monitoring of gang activity and partnerships with community organizations to provide alternative activities for youth. Policing programs involve continually building on the Department's Community Policing strategy, which is the foundation for the department's direction and long-term 260 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / SAFETY Amended 1/13/2016 goals. The "Commitment to Community" which appears on all patrol cars, the department website, and more direct public contact with officers are direct results of this strategy. Fire Department The mission of the San Rafael Fire Department is to ensure the safety, health and well-being of all individuals, property, and the environment through a comprehensive range of programs designed to respond to threats from fire, illness and injury, environmental hazards and natural disasters. The Department is responsive to the community's growing needs though its programs for Community Fire Servicing, Emergency Response, Fire Prevention, Disaster Preparedness and Environmental Services. The San Rafael Fire Department recently completed a "Standard of Cover Plan" to identify appropriate response times and the number of personnel required to mitigate an emergency, and to provide an overall risk assessment of fire in San Rafael. Because of the Fire Department's effectiveness in adopting and implementing firesafe construction, the volume of fire -related calls has declined dramatically over the years; calls for emergency medical service total 70 to 80 percent of calls for service. With the aging of San Rafael's population over the next decade, calls for paramedic service will increase, as will the cost and expectations of service. The Fire Department is committed to providing quality, accessible and cost-effective paramedic care in response to changing needs. The City has prepared a number of studies and regulations related to wildland safety. The Fire Department's recent study Wildland Urban Intermix Threat Analysis evaluated safety issues related to wildland fires in San Rafael's hillside areas. A Fire Management Plan, which includes a Transportation and Evacuation Plan component, was prepared for each `High Hazard" area identified in the study. San Rafael's ISO rating is Class 3 (on a scale of 1 to 10, with 1 being the highest rating). Water supply received a relative classification of 1. Minimum roadway width requirements are set forth in the Fire Department's "Access Road Requirements," which are implemented as part of development review. In addition, required vegetation clearances around structures are addressed in the California Fire Code, as adopted by the City of San Rafael. Disaster Preparedness Emergency (disaster) preparedness planning consists of three major components: government actions, private organization emergency response actions, and individual or small group actions. Emergency preparedness planning recognizes that in the first 72 -hours after a major disaster, people must be self-sufficient. Governments cannot provide all of the services that may be needed. Therefore, disaster preparedness involves planning efforts by local government, private organizations and local groups to identify resources, provide public awareness and formulate plans about what to do in an emergency situation. nno .,f the , 1_1tG MeS of fho r—� o plsnning efferts was f„ The Communitv Emeraencv Reponse Team (CERT) program offers training for develop the Reighberheed traiRiFig pregraM Galled Disaster Area RespeRse Tea {D,AP..T.). This pr9gram was developed to f, - neighbors to work together and to be self-sufficient during a major disaster. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / SAFETY 261 S-26. Fire and Police Services. Maintain adequate cost-effective fire protection, paramedic and police services. Minimize increases in service needs from new development through continued fire prevention and community policing programs. S -26a. Public Safety Training. Provide and encourage public safety employee training to ensure team members' skills remain current. Encourage and support new employees to join programs, such as Urban Search and Rescue and disaster relief training programs (CERTDART). Responsibility: Fire, Police, Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time, Grants Community policing became a City philosophy in 1997. S -26b. Vehicle and Equipment Maintenance. Maintain and upgrade vehicles and equipment as necessary. Responsibility: Fire, Police, Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Capital Improvements, Grants S -26c. Fire Prevention and Safe Design. Through the development review process, require review by Fire Department and Police Department for fire prevention and safe design. Responsibility: Fire, Police Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees S-27. Community Policing and Fire Service. Actively promote Community Policing and Community Fire Servicing in order to facilitate closer relations between police and fire departments and neighborhood groups, businesses and residents. S -27a. Restorative Justice Program. Develop a community-based restorative justice program, which would provide for alternative sentencing methods and a diversion program where offenders are accountable to the community. Cooperate with County authorities to review, identify and evaluate alternative sentencing methods to enhance the community. Responsibility: Police Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time, Grants, Fines W h a t I s Restorative Justice? Restorative justice is a response to crime that recognizes that criminal behavior injures victims and the entire community. It is a process that seeks to repair the harm caused by crime by involving victims and communities in the justice system through processes such as direct restitution, victim - offender mediation and policies that promote victims' rights. S -27b. Business Regulation. Maintain and adopt, as necessary, regulatory ordinances and regulatory procedures for businesses determined to be susceptible to criminal activities not otherwise regulated by Federal and State agencies, such as massage parlors. Responsibility: Police Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees S -27c. Community Fire Servicing. Continue to provide health and fire safety outreach programs to community groups. Responsibility: Fire Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time 262 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / SAFETY Amended 1/13/2016 S-28. Paramedic Services. Continue to seek adequate and cost-effective ways to provide accessible and reasonable emergency medical services. S -28a. Paramedic Tax. Continue to support the paramedic tax. Responsibility: City Manager Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Volunteers S -28b. Partnerships for Prevention Programs. Seek public and private partnerships, such as cooperating with hospitals and other public and private medical providers, to offer prevention programs and medical information. Responsibility: Fire, Police Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time S-29. Effective Communication System. Ensure that all City agencies with public safety responsibilities are provided with effective, reliable and robust emergency communications systems and equipment. The system and equipment should have adequate capacity and redundancy to ensure these agencies can accomplish their missions. Appropriate consideration should also be given to the communications needs of agencies that may be required to supply mutual aid to or from other jurisdictions. S -29a. Involvement with Marin Emergency Radio Authority. Maintain active involvement with Marin Emergency Radio Authority (MERA) and pursue installation and activation of the MERA radio system. Responsibility: Fire, Police, Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time S-30. Maintenance and Landscaping for Fire Safety. Encourage, where appropriate, special planting, removal and maintenance programs to reduce potential fire hazards in the hills, wildland areas and urban interface areas. S -30a. Fire Hazard Maps. As part of the City's Fire Hazard Program, maintain maps identifying potential fire hazard areas in San Rafael. Responsibility: Fire Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time, Grant S -30b. Fire Protection Ordinance. Consider- the adoption of Fire Protection O Continue to implement Wildlife Urban Interface (WUII standards within the Ordinance to reduce fire hazards in areas in the urban interface area. Responsibility: Fire Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time See OS -2 (Open Space Management). San Rafael's paramedic services are funded in part by a paramedic tax. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 1 SAFETY 263 S-31. New Development in Fire Hazard Areas. Design new development located on or adjacent to natural hillsides to minimize fire hazards to life and property. S -31a. New Development. Through the development review process, require appropriate mitigation measures such as fire preventive site design, landscaping and building materials, and the use of fire suppression techniques such as sprinklering. Responsibility: Fire, Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees S-32. Safety Review of Development Projects. Require crime prevention and fire prevention techniques in new development, including adequate access for emergency vehicles. Disaster S -32a. Safe Buildings. Continue to review development applications to insure that landscaping, lighting, building siting and design, emergency access, adequate water pressure and peakload storage capacity, and building construction materials reduce the opportunity for crime and fire hazards. Responsibility: Fire, Community Development, Police Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees A natural (i.e. flood, earthquake) or man-made (terrorist, chemical release) event that exceeds City capability to respond using normal resources. See LU -2a (Development Review). S-33. Disaster Preparedness Planning. Ensure disaster preparedness in cooperation with other public agencies and appropriate public -interest organizations. Expand abilities of residents to assist in local responses to disasters. S -33a. Disaster Preparedness Plan. Update and publicize the City's emergency response (disaster) plan in conformance with State guidelines. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time Urban Search and Rescue teams train regularly. S -33b. Urban Search and Rescue Techniques. Continue to ensure that Urban Search and Rescue techniques remain current. Responsibility: Fire, Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time S -33c. Neighborhood Disaster Preparedness. Continue to coordinate neighborhood disaster response preparedness planning efforts through Fire and Police Department programs and through coordination with the American Red Cross, American Heart Association and other community groups. Provide technical assistance as needed to review adequacy of neighborhood disaster plans. Responsibility: Fire, Police Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time 264 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / SAFETY Amended 1/13/2016 S -33d. Standardized Emergency Management System. Continue to train City employees in the Standardized Emergency Management System offered by the Governor's Office of Emergency Services. Responsibility: Fire, Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time See S -26a (Public Safety Training). S -33e. Training of Citizen Police Academy and DART Graduates. Organize neighborhood teams of Citizen Police Academy and CERTDARTF graduates, and provide training on how to maintain public safety in their neighborhood during emergency situations. Responsibility: Fire, Police Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time S-34. Emergency Operation Center. Through Community Fire Create a well-equipped Emergency Operation Center that is permanent and centrally Servicing, the Fire located to coordinate emergency responses to emergencies. Department reaches out to S -34a. Emergency Operations Center. Determine the location of, and explore funding residents of all sources for a permanent and centrally located Emergency Operation Center as well as ages. alternative emergency locations. Responsibility: City Manager, Public Works Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time, Grants S-35. Safety Personnel in Times of Emergency. Make provisions to continue essential emergency public services during natural and other catastrophes. S -35a. Employee Transportation. To ensure adequate safety personnel in an emergency, explore ways to transport public safety employees from outlying areas when damaged infrastructure prevents them from driving to San Rafael. Responsibility: Fire, Public Works Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time S -35b. Mutual Aid Agreements. Continue to explore the feasibility of mutual aid agreements that provide public safety personnel in times of emergency. Responsibility: Fire, Police Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time S -35c. Housing Incentives. Support State legislation and City initiatives that would provide incentives for public safety employees to live in San Rafael, so that they may be readily available if a disaster should occur. Responsibility: City Manager Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / SAFETY 265 S-36. Emergency Connectors. Pursue the development of local emergency connectors in the short-term and permanent roadway connections between Terra Linda and Downtown San Rafael. Seek adequate emergency connectors to all areas of San Rafael, and between San Rafael and adjacent communities. EMERGENCY CONNECTORS Emergency connectors are defined as routes available only for emergency vehicle use, as well as general circulation routes that are needed/important for emergency vehicle use. S -36a. Emergency Connectors. Evaluate and improve the following emergency connectors in light of costs, effectiveness, and impacts: 1. Provide emergency street connectors throughout the City, including the existing connection between Freitas Parkway and Fawn Drive, the all-weather connection between Freitas and Fawn and between Ridgewood and Fawn, and the connection between Del Ganado and Butterfield Road; 2. Maintain the ability to use the private portion of Sienna Way in Dominican in case of emergency, as an alternative exit for Mountain View. 3. Maintain emergency access between Peacock and Biscayne Drives for emergency vehicle use only. Responsibility: Fire, Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time See C -23a (Better Signage). S-37. Functioning Public Utilities Following Earthquake. Locate and construct vital public utilities as well as communication and transportation facilities in a way that maximizes their potential to remain functional during and after an earthquake. S -37a. Engineering Standards. Continue to build public utilities to adopted engineering standards. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time, Capital Improvements Program S-38. Building Code and Fire Code Update. Continue updating the Building and Fire Codes as necessary to address earthquake, fire and other hazards and support programs for the identification and abatement of existing hazardous structures. S -38a. State Required Code Updates. Continue to adopt State -required code updates with provisions for public review and input. Responsibility: Fire, Community Development Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time 266 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / SAFETY Amended 1/13/2016 S-39. Public Safety Facilities, Ensure that public safety facilities are designed and constructed adequately to efficiently operate paramedic, fire and police services, including in times of disaster. S -39a. Public Safety Facilities. Evaluate needed upgrades to public safety facilities, particularly seismic safety improvements, and seek funding mechanisms. In order to meet the existing and projected future needs of the San Rafael Police Department, the City will determine the department's existing and project facility needs; obtain the necessary funding for the needed improvement; and, purchase, construct, and/or renovate the necessary additional facilities. Responsibility: Fire, Police Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time See I -2a (Long Term Needs). S-40. Outreach. Encourage educational outreach to promote awareness and caution among residents regarding disaster preparedness of possible natural hazards, including soil conditions, earthquakes, flooding, and fire hazards. Establish an outreach program, including establishing programs. Publicize disaster plans by neighborhood. S -40a. City's Website. Manage and update the Fire Department's website to provide information and links to meet the fire servicing needs of the community. Responsibility: Fire Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time S -40b. Enrollment in Training Programs. Increase enrollment in the training programs for residents and neighborhood associations. Responsibility: Fire Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time S -40c. Neighborhood Educational Programs. Support educational programs, such as CERTD 4 R TF and Citizen's Police Academy in the neighborhoods. Responsibility: Fire, Police Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time Police work as partners with the schools on educational programs. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / SAFETY 267 268 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / SAFETY Amended 1/13/2016 Noise Introduction Noise is part of everyday life in a community. Noise is generally defined as unwanted sound. Whether a sound is unwanted depends on when and where it occurs, what the listener is doing when it occurs, characteristics of the sound (loudness, pitch and duration, speech or music content, irregularity), and how intrusive it is above background sound levels. In the City of San Rafael, vehicular traffic on the roadways is the single largest source of noise. Airplanes and mechanical equipment are also contributors, as are intermittent sources such as leafblowers and construction equipment. Average noise levels are highest along Highways 101 and 580 and along major traffic corridors. The City of San Rafael will continue its efforts to curb noise impacts from existing sources and will also take actions that prevent adverse levels of noise from being generated by new sources. Such efforts include encouraging the design of new development projects in a manner that minimizes the exposure of residents and workers to excessive levels of noise. Our Quality of Life Exhibit 3 0 : Typical Sound Levels Common Outdoor Common Indoor Sound Levels Noise Level Db (A) Sound Levels Commercial Airliner Takeoff at 110 Rock Band 1,000 feet 100 Ambulance Siren at 100 feet Gas Lawn Mower at 3 feet 90 Food Blender at 3 feet Diesel Truck at 50 feet Garbage Disposal at 3 feet 80 Noisy Urban Daytime Shouting at 3 feet 70 Vacuum Cleaner at 10 feet Commercial Area 60 Normal Speech at 3 feet Large Business Office Quiet Urban Daytime 50 Dishwasher Next Room Quiet Urban Nighttime Small Theatre 40 Quiet Suburban Nighttime Large Conference Room 30 Quiet Rural Nighttime Bedroom at Night 20 Rustling Leaves Broadcast & Recording Studio 10 Soft Whisper 0 Threshold of Hearing Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NOISE 267 Effects of Noise on People The noise environment has a significant impact on the City's overall quality of life. Below are some of the effects of noise on people. How is Noise Measured? Sound is the result of the vibration of an object, which is transmitted through the air in waves that in turn vibrate the eardrum. Sound is measured in a logarithmic scale using units called decibels (dB). Since the human ear does not hear all sounds equally, a special weighted decibel measurement (dBA) is used to simulate human hearing. Ldn (Sound Level, day -night average) is the average dBA sound level during a 24-hour day. Sound levels during the night are weighted over those during daylight hours, by adding ten decibels to actual sound levels during the period from 10 p.m. to 7 a.m. to recognize the increased annoyance factor related to noise at night. Examples of typical sound levels are shown in Figure 30. The outdoor noise environment throughout the United States varies considerably. Outdoor Day -Night Average (Ldn) sound levels can be as low as 30 to 40 dBA (Ldn) in wilderness areas and as high as 85-90 dBA (Ldn) in noisy industrial urban areas. In San Rafael, Ldn levels in residential areas are as low as 45 dBA (Ldn) in quiet valleys shielded from major roads and as high as 65-75 dBA (Ldn) along highways and major roads. Medical and Annoyance Effects. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), noise above 40-45 dBA can disturb a sleeping person: whether a person awakens will depend on noise levels, type of noise, stage of sleep, age, and so on. (EPA, 1974). Older people and persons who are ill are particularly susceptible to sleep interference caused by noise. Speech interference begins occurring at 45-50 dBA, and becomes severe at 60 dBA or above. Damage to the human ear can occur at about 70 dBA. Sounds above 70 dBA can cause physical stress reactions, such as tightening of the stomach muscles, increased heartbeat and adrenaline flow. Over a period of time these reactions can lead to ulcers, intestinal malfunctions, and heart disease. Permanent hearing damage can occur at 80- 85 dBA, if sustained over eight hours a day over the course of a worker's career. Higher levels cause hearing damage in shorter period of time. • Economic Effects. Studies have found that work performance can be affected at noise levels of 65 dBA and above. Some effects of noise on work performance are as follows: Noise is more likely to reduce the accuracy of work than to reduce quantity. Complex tasks are more likely to be affected by noise. Higher frequency, intermittent and impulsive sounds are more disruptive than lower or more steady state sounds. Noise causes higher accident rates. Other adverse economic costs of noise are housing turnover; soundproofing for noise -producing equipment and noise -impacted buildings; and the expense of constructing noise barriers adjacent to noise sources. Basis for Noise Standards Acceptable levels of noise vary from land use to land use. Also, in any one location, the noise level will vary over time, from the lowest background or ambient levels to that of passing airplanes or construction equipment. Various techniques have been developed that measure the effects of noise levels over a period of time. It is difficult to specify noise levels that are generally acceptable to everyone. What is annoying to one person may be unnoticed by another. Standards may be based on documented complaint activity in response to noise levels, or based on studies on the 268 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NOISE Amended 1/13/2016 ability of people to sleep, talk, or work under various noise conditions. All such studies, however, recognize that individual responses vary considerably. Standards usually address the needs of most of the general population. With this caution in mind, noise standards for planning purposes need to examine outdoor and indoor noise levels acceptable for different uses. The standards must relate to existing conditions in the City so that they are realistically enforceable and consistent with other General Plan policies. (See Appendices F and G for Noise Contours for 2001 and 2020.) Addressing Noise Impacts in the General Plan The General Plan seeks to limit the impacts of noise on residents and employees in two ways. First, the Plan contains standards to determine the suitability of new land uses depending upon the extent of noise exposure in the area. Second, Plan policies limit the extent of new noise sources that proposed development can add to existing noise levels in the surrounding area and through implementation of the City's Noise Ordinance, which limits what is commonly described as "nuisance noise." Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NOISE 269 GOAL 29: ACCEPTABLE NOISE LEVELS It is the goal of San Rafael to have acceptable noise levels. Excessive noise is a concern for many residents of San Rafael. These concerns can be managed with proper mitigation or through the implementation of the noise ordinance. The City of San Rafael recognizes the issue of noise and has standards to protect people from excessive, unnecessary and unreasonable noises from any and all sources in the community. Noise Impacts on New Projects N-1. Noise Impacts on New Development. Protect people in new development from excessive noise by applying noise standards in land use decisions. Apply the Land Use Compatibility Standards (see Exhibit 31) to the siting of new uses in existing noise environments. These standards identify the acceptability of a project based on noise exposure. If a project exceeds the standards in Exhibit 31, an acoustical analysis shall be required to identify noise impacts and potential noise mitigations. Mitigation should include the research and use of state-of- the-art abating materials and technology. N -la. Acoustical Studies. Require acoustical studies for all new residential projects within the projected La„ 60 dB noise contours (see Exhibit 31) so that noise mitigation measures can be incorporated into project design. Acoustical studies shall identify noise sources and contain a discussion of the existing and future noise exposure and the mitigation measures that may be used to achieve the appropriate outdoor and indoor noise standards. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees 270 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NOISE Amended 1/13/2016 Exhibit 31 Land Use Compatibility Standards for New Development Exterior Noise Exposure to the Site Ldn (dB) Land Use 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 Residential, Hotels, Motels Schools, Libraries, Churches, Hospitals, Nursing Homes Auditoriums, Concert Halls, Amphitheaters Sports Arena, Outdoor Spectator Sports Playgrounds, Neighborhood Parks Other Outdoor Recreation and Cemeteries Office and Other Commercial Uses Industrial, Manufacturing, Utilities, Agriculture Bedrooms in Residential units not in Downtown Other Rooms in Residential Units not in Downtown Bedrooms in Residential units in Downtown Interior Noise Exposure Ldn (dB) 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 Hotels, Motels, Downtown Multifamily Normally Acceptable — Specified land use is satisfactory, based upon the assumption that any buildings involved are of normal conventional construction, without any special noise insulation requirements. Conditionally Acceptable — Specific land use may be permitted only after detailed analysis of the noise reduction requirements and needed noise insulation features included in the design. ■ Clearly Unacceptable — New construction of development clearly should not be undertaken. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NOISE 271 N-2. Exterior Noise Standards for Residential Use Areas. The exterior noise standard for backyards and/or common usable outdoor areas in new residential development is up to Ldn of 60 dB. In common usable outdoor areas in Downtown, mixed-use residential, and high density residential districts, up to Ldn of 65 dB may be allowed if determined acceptable through development review. See N -la (Acoustical Studies). N-3. Planning and Design of New Development. Encourage new development to be planned and designed to minimize noise impacts from outside noise sources. N -3a. Noise Mitigation. Require, where appropriate, the following mitigation measures to minimize noise impacts on proposed development projects: 1. Site planning. Proper site planning is the first mitigation measure that should be investigated to reduce noise impacts. By taking advantage of the natural shape and terrain of the site, it often is possible to arrange the buildings and other uses in a manner that will reduce and possibly eliminate noise impacts. Specific site planning techniques include: a. Increasing the distance between the noise source and the receiver; b. Placing non -noise sensitive land uses such as parking lots, maintenance facilities, and utility areas between the source and the receiver; c. Using non -noise sensitive structures such as garages to shield noise -sensitive areas; and d. Orienting buildings to shield outdoor spaces from a noise source. 2. Architectural layout of buildings. In many cases, noise reduction can be attained by careful layout of noise -sensitive spaces. Bedrooms, for example, should be placed away from freeways. Quiet outdoor spaces can be provided next to a noisy highway by creating a U-shaped development, which faces away from the highway. 3. Noise Barriers. Absorptive types of noise barriers or walls should be used to reduce noise levels from ground transportation noise sources and industrial sources. A barrier must interrupt the line of sight between the noise source and the receiver in order to reduce noise level both outdoors and indoors. A barrier should provide at least L& 5 dB of noise reduction to achieve a noticeable change in noise levels. 4. Construction modifications. If site planning, architectural layout, noise barriers, or a combination of these measures does not achieve the required noise reduction, then mitigation should be facilitated through construction modification to walls, roofs, ceilings, doors, windows. 5. Alternatives to Sound Walls. Encourage new development to identify alternatives to the use of sound walls to ease noise impacts. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees 272 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NOISE Amended 1/13/2016 Noise Impacts on Existing Development N-4. Noise from New Nonresidential Development. Design nonresidential development to minimize noise impacts on neighboring uses. a. Performance Standards for Uses Affecting Residential Districts. New nonresidential development shall not increase noise levels in a residential district by more than Ldn 3 dB, or create noise impacts that would increase noise levels to more than Ldn 60 dB at the property line of the noise receiving use, whichever is the more restrictive standard. b. Performance Standards for Uses Affecting Nonresidential and Mixed Use Districts. New nonresidential projects shall not increase noise levels in a nonresidential or mixed-use district by more than Ldn 5 dB, or create noise impacts that would increase noise levels to more than Ldn 65 dB (Office, Retail) or Ldn 70 dB (Industrial), at the property line of the noise receiving use, whichever is the more restrictive standard. c. Waiver. These standards may be waived if, as determined by an acoustical study, there are mitigating circumstances (such as higher existing noise levels), and no uses would be adversely affected. N -4a. Require Acoustical Study. Identify through an acoustical study noise mitigation measures to be designed and built into new nonresidential and mixed-use development, and encourage absorptive types of mitigation measures between noise sources and residential districts. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees N-5. Traffic Noise from New Development Minimize noise impacts of increased off-site traffic caused by new development. Where the exterior Ldn is 65 dB or greater at a residential building or outdoor use area and a plan, program, or project increases traffic noise levels by more than Ldn 3 dB, reasonable noise mitigation measures shall be included in the plan, program or project. N -5a. Traffic Noise Studies. Require acoustical studies to evaluate potential off-site noise impacts resulting from traffic generated by new development. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees N-6. Traffic Noise. Attempt to minimize traffic noise through land use policies, law enforcement, and street improvements. N -6a. Enforce Speed Limits. Enforce speed limits on roads generating numerous noise complaints. Responsibility: Police Department Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Police Department Operating Budget N -6b. Mixed -Use. (Deleted) Develop land use districts to allow housing close to offices and services to reduce the amount of traffic from local t4ps-. Responsibility: Co minnuyx4ty-Developnwnt Tnol.�wnei Slmrt To Resources: Staff Time Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NOISE 273 N -6c. Coordination with Local and State Agencies. Coordinate with CalTrans, Marin Countywide Planning Agency, Congestion Management Agency and other agencies to achieve noise reduction along Pt. San Pedro Road, Highways 101 and 580, and the Sonoma Marin Area Rail Transit corridor. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Staff Time N -6d. Vehicle Code. Enforce the California Vehicle Code regarding noisy vehicles. Responsibility: Police Dept. Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Police Department Operating Budget N -6e. Street Improvements. Pursue feasible cost-effective new street paving technologies to minimize traffic noise. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time N -6f. Widening of US 101 and 580. Encourage Caltrans to mitigate highway noise impacts as a part of the US 101 widening project. Review and comment, as necessary, on any proposed sound walls in San Rafael. Encourage Caltrans to use noise mitigation measures other than walls if they can be shown to be effective. These measures may include alternative pavement types and sound -absorptive treatments on existing and future noise barriers. Responsibility: Public Works, City Council Timeframe: Short Te Resources: Staff Time See C -21a (Traffic Calming Program). N-7. Airport/Heliport. To the extent allowed by federal and state law, consider and mitigate noise impacts of any changes in facilities or operations that require use permit mitigations or other land use permits at the San Rafael Airport in north San Rafael and the heliport in East San Rafael (see Noise Contours for San Rafael Airport and Heliport in Exhibits 32 and 33). See LU -2a (Development Review). N-8. Sonoma Marin Area Rail Transit. If a commuter rail service or other use is developed along the Sonoma Marin Area Rail Transit right-of-way, minimize noise impacts on existing development. N -8a. Future Transitway Mitigation Measures. A detailed noise assessment and appropriate mitigation measures should be prepared for any rail project on the Sonoma Marin Area Rail Transit right-of-way. The analysis should address the City's noise standards and the Federal Transit Administrations (FTA) guidelines. Responsibility: Community Development or Joint Powers Authority Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Potential Taxes (Sales) 274 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NOISE Amended 1/13/2016 Exhibit 32 IAX RAMIL San Rafael Airport Noise Contours •W � San Rafael City Limit Planning Arae Note: Noise contours reflect conditions as of 2003 �o. a IPP eoa goo FWt 100 200 300 400 Meters Exhibit 33 F Heliport Noise Contours Note: Noise contours reflect conditions as of 2003 Q 100 200 300 Feet 0 1 100 200 300 400 Feet N-9. Nuisance Noise. Minimize impacts from noise levels that exceed community sound levels. N -9a. Enforce and Update the Noise Ordinance. Enforce and update, as necessary, the City's Noise Ordinance that addresses common noise nuisances including amplified music, outdoor mechanical equipment and construction activities. Responsibility: Police Department Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time N-9b44b. Mitigation for Construction Activity Noise. Through environmental review, identify mitigation measures to minimize the exposure of neighboring properties to excessive noise levels from construction -related activity. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fee N-9c1k. Noise Specifications. Include noise specifications in requests for equipment information and bids for new City equipment and consider this information as part of evaluation of the bids. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time, Capital Improvements N-9d4Ad. San Rafael Rock Quarry. Seek to minimize noise impacts of the quarry and brickyard operations through cooperative efforts with the County of Marin through its code enforcement and land use entitlement processes. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time See NH -143a (Rock Quarry Plan) and NH -144a (Rock Quarry Impacts). Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / NOISE 277 Open Space Introduction Our Natural Resources Natural features and resources have shaped both the growth and form of San Rafael and provide many of the attractive characteristics of the area. San Rafael has a significant diversity of natural features and assets that are important to preserve through land use planning. Those important resources include bay lands and water, canal frontage, streams, a ridgeline edge for the community, clean air and valuable wildlife habitat. A central concern of the General Plan, therefore, in considering the location, design, intensity and type of land uses in the City, is to continue to protect natural resource areas. In 1972, voters approved a tax levy and the formation of the Marin County Open Space District to acquire and maintain open space, park and recreational lands. In that same year there was also a San Rafael voter -approved bond measure, where individual neighborhoods passed bonds to purchase open space in the area. With these events taking place, emphasis was given to the importance of purchasing open space for the community. Since then tremendous progress has been made in securing and protecting open space throughout the County. San Rafael has largely met its initial objectives by securing 3,285 acres of open space within the City limits and almost 7,300 acres in the Planning Area. The Marin County Open Space District has also secured considerable land in San Rafael's Planning Area. One-quarter of the land in San Rafael's Planning Area is secured open space. Oak trees and grasslands are valuable open space habitat. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / OPEN SPACE 279 GOAL 30: PROTECTED OPEN SPACE It is the goal of San Rafael to preserve and protect open space and the natural environment for all to enjoy. Preservation of open space and the natural environment have been a priority for San Rafael residents for many years. Whenever possible, the natural terrain and vegetation of the community should be preserved and maintained. OS -1. Open Space Preservation. Preserve, through a variety of methods, the open space areas identified in the Inventory of Potential Open Space Sites (See Appendix I). Retain and protect open space areas that serve as delineators between neighborhoods and between adjacent communities, as wildlife habitat, and as visual assets for the community. Open space areas can also function as connections between neighborhoods, for example with the creation of pathways in environmentally appropriate areas. OS -la. Open Space Inventory. Update the Inventory of Potential Open Space Sites. Identify and prioritize open space parcels for future protection. Maximize the use of available resources when assessing City involvement in securing open space by applying the following non -prioritized evaluation criteria: a. Environmental health and safety issues (specifically geology and hydrology), and potential geoseismic hazards. b. Resource Areas and Aesthetics (visual backdrop or edge, unique site features, shorelines/ridgelines, wetlands, wildlife habitat including wildlife movement corridors and habitat for endangered species). c. Importance to the community as a whole or adjoining neighborhoods. d. Merits of alternative uses. e. Proximity to other open space areas. f. Recreation potential. g. Accessibility. h. Availability of outside financial assistance. i. Potential maintenance and management costs and liability exposure for the City. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time, Grants OS -lb. Preservation Opportunities. Through the development review process, preserve open space areas identified on the Open Space Inventory. Encourage the dedication of open space areas that are adjacent to public open space. Possibilities also include acquisition of fee title or acquiring easements for preserving open space. When potential open space is not contiguous to existing public open space, the preference is to retain the open space in private ownership. When portions of a site are retained as private open space, ensure the preservation and management of that open space through appropriate means, including required maintenance, as determined though development review. Work with other public and non-profit agencies to identify sources for acquisition and maintenance of open space. Responsibility: Community Development, Public Works, City Manager Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees, Grants, Donations, Bonds OS -lc. Cluster Development. As part of the development review process, encourage the clustering of development to preserve desired open space. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees 280 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / OPEN SPACE Amended 1/13/2016 Exhibit 34 Open Space Dedicated Open Space Public Access to Parks and Open Space (existing and potential) 0 500 1000 1500 Meters 1 Miles OS -2. Open Space Management. Maintain and manage City Open Space lands. Designate appropriate uses to specific sites. Determine maintenance needs to address uses and the preservation of natural amenities. Address illegal camping and campfires, disease control, erosion control, urban/wildlife interface, recreation and other activities harmful to open space environment, as well as vegetation management and wildlife habitat protection issues. OS -2a. Open Space Management Plan(s). Establish a committee with representatives from neighborhood associations, environmental organizations, user groups and other stakeholders to prepare an Open Space Management Plan(s). The plan should address use and ongoing maintenance of open space areas. The management plan should address appropriate access points, parking areas, public information signage, trail extensions, restoration of erosion and other degraded areas, and guidelines for the location of amenities such as picnic tables and benches. Amend zoning provisions as needed. Funding options should be explored and identified for open space management such as open space maintenance assessment districts, agreements with other public agencies for maintenance, neighborhood "adoption," volunteer programs, private funding and other means. Responsibility: Public Works, Police Department, Fire Department, Community Services, Community Development Timeframe: Long Term San Rafael hillsides were purchased in the 1970s and preserved as open space for perpetuity. Resources: Staff Time, Grants, Volunteers, Donations OS -2b. Removal of Invasive Species. Use volunteer and other types of work crews to remove selected invasive vegetation from open space areas. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time, Volunteers OS -2c. Diseased Vegetation. Work with County and regional experts in finding solutions for the prevention and disposal of diseased vegetation, such as vegetation affected by Sudden Oak Death Syndrome. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: General Fund OS -2d. Illegal Encampments. Continue to work with private and public property owners to identify and remove illegal encampments in open space areas. Responsibility: Police, Fire, Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time, Fines See CON -15a (Invasive Plant Ordinance), (VITT 15b (Removal of invasive Speeies an n -iyate Pr-apeFtt. and CON -15b4 -Se (Removal of Invasive Species on Public Property). OS -3. Open Space Use. Protect and preserve the natural value of open space and wildlife habitat areas while permitting educational and recreational uses compatible with these resources. Specific use objectives include: a. Open space areas should be maintained in a natural state. b. Open space areas are a community resource for use and enjoyment by the residents of San Rafael. c. Uses of open space areas shall be secondary to open space preservation, and limited to those uses with a minimal impact on the environment. 282 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / OPEN SPACE Amended 1/13/2016 OS -3a. Management of Private Open Space. In designating open space as part of a development project or with the dedication of land for open space, identify limitations to uses in those areas, such as restrictions on ornamental landscaping, structures and fences. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees See OS -2a (Open Space Management Plans). OS -4. Access to Open Space. Encourage provision of access to open space areas in the design of adjacent development. Secure access paths shown on Exhibit 34 as part of subdivision approvals and design access paths to avoid or minimize neighborhood and user conflicts with sensitive wildlife habitat areas. OS -4a. Access Points. Through the development review process, identify access points and parking areas to be retained and required improvements. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees OS -5. Coordination with Other Jurisdictions. Coordinate San Rafael's open space system with adjacent cities, Marin County, the State, and regional and private open space systems. OS -5a. Coordination with Other Jurisdictions. Continue to work with public agencies managing open space within the San Rafael Planning Area to ensure a coordinated system. Responsibility: City Manager, Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time OS -6. Utilities in Open Space. Discourage utilities in open space areas. Necessary utilities in open space should be located and designed to minimize harm to the area's environmental and visual quality. OS -6a. Utilities in Open Space. Use zoning ordinance provisions and the design and environmental review processes to evaluate the location and design of public utilities. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees OS -7. Public Education. Provide education programs to residents about wildlife, fire hazard, watershed protection and open space habitat. OS -7a. Public Education. Continue outreach and public education. Examples include the dissemination of educational materials and programs related to wildland fire prevention, feral cats, and Marin County Stormwater Pollution Prevention Program (MCSTOPPP) requirements. Responsibility: Fire, Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time, Grants Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / OPEN SPACE 283 Conservation Introduction Our Natural Resources Conservation helps prevent the wasteful destruction and neglect of San Rafael's natural resources, particularly scarce resources. The City recognizes that natural resources must be maintained for their economic and recreational use as well as for their ecological value. The Conservation Element policies address water, air quality and wildlife and cover the topics of Wetlands; Diked Baylands; Creeks and Drainageways; Native Plants, Animals and Habitat; and Resource Management. San Rafael's Habitats San Rafael is rich with diverse habitats, such as creeks and drainageways, seasonal freshwater wetlands, tidal wetlands and riparian areas that are valued resources for San Rafael's wildlife. Protection, restoration or enhancement of damaged habitats is important for the continued health of San Rafael's natural environment. Habitats have been damaged by the spread of non-native invasive plants. The City must build on its efforts to manage undesirable invasive species. Landscaping with native species should be encouraged for restoration projects. Protection of the creeks and drainageways and wetlands, and the plants and animals that live in and near them, can be achieved by managing public access along these areas and by minimizing encroachment by new development to only that which is unavoidable. This can be accomplished by preserving buffer areas along creeks and drainageways, associated riparian areas and wetlands. Another way to protect creeks is to improve public access points so that uncontrolled foot traffic does not damage these sensitive habitats. The endangered Salt Marsh Harvest Mouse in his (or her) Pickleweed habitat. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CONSERVATION 285 ThIS hese farC ra San Rafe. for use bef Exhibit 35 r i1M 11/1[L Major Biotic Habitats r7Grasslands Agricultura Wetlands FIChaparral L—]II f Oak SavannalWoodlands llllllll 111 Riparian Urbani.ed@eveloped 0 500 1000 1500 Meters �i 0.5 1 1.5 Miles GOAL 31: PROTECTED HABITAT It is the goal of San Rafael to have enhanced habitat for native plants and animals, and special protection for species that are listed as threatened or endangered. San Rafael is rich in wildlife and native plant habitats, such as wetlands, creeks, shorelines, oak woodlands and riparian areas, as well as wildlife corridors between them, and these habitats are being protected or restored as necessary. CON -1. Protection of Environmental Resources. Protect or enhance environmental resources, such as ridgelines, wetlands, diked baylands, creeks and drainageways, shorelines and habitat for threatened and endangered species. CON-Ia. Plans for Environmental Protection. Complete the implementation of Mahon Creek Final Conceptual Plan and the Shoreline Park Master Plan. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Grants, Contributions See LU -2a (Development Review). Wetlands Wetlands are defined as: "Areas under the jurisdiction of the US Army Corps of Engineers that are inundated or saturated by surface or ground water at a frequency and duration sufficient to support a prevalence of vegetation that is typically adaptive for life in saturated soils conditions. Wetlands y Inciluae DOT limited to seasonal wetlands, marshes, vernal pools and bogs." Wetlands are fragile, natural resources subject to flooding, erosion, soil -bearing capacity limitations and other hazards. In addition they are resources of special significance due to the modulation of flood waters, water quality and habitat functions they perform, and resulting values identified by man such as control of flood velocities, floodwater storage, floodwater passage, aquifer recharge, erosion control, pollution control, wildlife habitat, education, scientific study, open space and recreation. CON -2. Wetlands Preservation. Require appropriate public and private wetlands preservation, restoration and/or rehabilitation through compensatory mitigation in the development process for unavoidable impacts. Support and promote acquisition of fee title and/or easements from willing property owners. CON -2a. Wetlands Overlay District. Continue to implement wetlands policy through the Wetlands Overlay zoning district and development review. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees valuable habitat for many local and migratory birds. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CONSERVATION 287 See also OS -la (Open Space Inventory), OS -lb (Preservation Opportunities), and OS -lc (Cluster Development). CON -3. Wetland Protection and Mitigation. In order to protect and preserve valued wetlands, loss of wetlands due to filling shall be avoided, unless it is not possible or practical. When it is demonstrated that it is not possible or practical to avoid filling a wetland because of site constraints and conditions such as the geographic location of the wetlands, site configuration and size, require that the wetland be replaced on-site, and in-kind at a minimum ratio of 2:1 (e.g., 2 acres for each acre lost). If it is determined that on-site mitigation is not possible or practical, off-site mitigation shall be required at a minimum replacement ratio of 3:1. As assessed and determined on a case-by-case basis, the Wet I and Def in i t i on s City may waive this policy for fill of small wetlands (0.1 acre or less in size), provided that: (1) the wetland Wetland Restoration — To bring a wetland is isolated meaning that it is not within, a part of, back into existence in an area where directly connected with or hydrologically -linked by wetlands had historically occurred, but were natural flow to a creek, drainageway, wetland or lost due to the actions of man or through submerged tidlands; (2) it is demonstrated by a wetland natural process. expert that the preservation of the wetland is not practical as it would not result in a functioning, Wetland Enhancement — The modification biological resource because of its isolation; (3) the City of a natural or created wetland to enhance has determined that filling would result in a more one or more functions. Enhancement of appropriate and desirable site plan for the project; and some wetland functions may negatively (4) the City consults with and considers comments affect other functions. received from the appropriate resource agencies with wetland oversight (State of California Department of Wetland Creation — To bring a wetland into Fish and Game and/or the California Regional Water existence, whether by accident or Quality Control Board). intentionally, where none existed previously; this includes the creation of wetlands for a. Creation of Wetlands. The creation of wetlands mitigation, habitat, and water quality shall be (1) of a similar habitat type to that of the purposes. existing wetlands and (2) of at least equal functional quality. The wetlands should be created Mitigation — Actions taken to avoid, reduce, or restored on or adjacent to the site, where or compensate for the effects of human- possible. If on-site creation is infeasible due to induced environmental damage. technical constraints, compensatory habitat may be created off-site, preferably in the same drainage basin. Restoration of former filled, drained or diked wetland habitat is preferred over creation of wetlands on lands that were historically uplands. Plans for this habitat shall be prepared by a qualified wetland restoration ecologist in consultation with appropriate federal and state resource agencies. Mitigation plans shall require an annual monitoring for a period of time as specified by a qualified biologist to determine mitigation success. Contingency measures to deal with the potential for a lack of success should also be included in the plan. b. Timing of Restoration or Creation. Restoration or creation of wetlands should be completed prior to construction of the development. Where construction activities would adversely impact wetland restoration or creation, wetlands restoration or creation may completed after construction of the development, as determined through development review. 288 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CONSERVATION Amended 1/13/2016 CON -3a. Project Mitigation. Continue the City's practice of requiring mitigation for projects that would affect wetlands, in conjunction with recommendations of State and Federal agencies. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees CON -4. Wetland Setbacks. Maintain a minimum 50 -foot development -free setback from wetlands, including, but not limited to, paving or structures. Setbacks of greater than 50 feet may be required on lots of two or more acres as determined through development review. The City may waive this requirement for minor encroachments if it can be demonstrated that the proposed setback adequately protects the functions of the wetland to the maximum extent feasible and resulting values to the satisfaction of the City after review by the appropriate regulatory agencies. See CON -2a (Wetlands Overlay District). CON -5. Diked BayIands. Protect seasonal wetlands and associated upland habitat contained within undeveloped diked baylands, or restore to tidal action. Support and promote acquisition from willing property owners. See LU -2a (Development Review). CON -6. Creek and Drainageway Setbacks. Require development -free setbacks, except for specific access points as approved per policy CON -7 (Public Access to Creeks), from existing creeks and drainageways that will maintain the functions and resulting values of these habitats. Appropriate erosion control and roadway crossings may encroach into the development setback. In the absence of vegetation, promote new growth of natural habitat. D i k e d B a y I a n d s Diked baylands serve as a buffer between urban and tidal areas and contribute to improved water quality in the Bay by trapping or removing pollutants from runoff and wastewater. They also act as interim storage basins for stormwater runoff and flood waters that coincide with high tides, buffer land areas from storms, high tides and erosion; habitat areas for threatened and endangered species; and can serve as possible mitigation areas. Their partial or complete flooding in the winter rainy season provides needed shallow wetland habitat for many species and flocks of migratory ducks and shorebirds. Creeks and Drainageways Creeks are perennial or intermittent watercourses that have defined bed and bank, i.e., the channel bed is incised into the substrate. Creeks are identified on Exhibit 36, based on the latest United States Geologic Survey (USGS) topographic maps. Creeks, with a defined bed and bank and with an unbroken riparian corridor of 50 feet or more not shown on the map are presumed to exist, and shall be identified through project review and protected under the policies of this plan. Drainageways are open drainage swales, or localized depressions that lack defined banks where intermittent or ephemeral runoff may concentrate, and open improved drainage channels with stabilized or improved banks. Drainageways do not support a. Creek Setback. Maintain a minimum 25- significant riparian habitat. Drainageways exist foot development -free setback from the top throughout San Rafael. During the development of creek banks for all new development review process, drainage capacity and habitat value (including, but not limited to, paving and of any drainageways on a site shall be assessed, structures), except for Miller Creek and its and appropriate setbacks determined. tributaries, where a minimum 50 -foot setback shall be maintained. Setbacks up to 100 feet may be required on lots or development projects two or more acres in size where development review Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CONSERVATION 289 determines a wider setback is needed to maintain functions and resulting habitat values and in areas where high quality riparian habitat exists. The City may waive this requirement for minor encroachments if it can be demonstrated that the proposed setback adequately protects the functions of the creek to the maximum extent feasible and resulting values to the satisfaction of the City after review by the appropriate regulatory agencies. b. Drainageway Setbacks. Drainageway setbacks shall be established through individual development review, taking into account existing habitat functions and resulting values. CON -6a. Municipal Code Compliance. Ensure that the San Rafael Municipal Code complies with local, state, and federal regulatory agencies requirements for erosion control. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Short Term See LU -2a (Development Review). CON -7. Public Access to Creeks. Provide pedestrian access to points along creeks throughout the City where such access will not adversely affect habitat values. CON -7a. Creek Access Points. Proactively identify and create desirable access points to creeks on public lands. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time CON -7b. Public Access. Through the development review process, identify and secure areas appropriate for access points to creeks. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees CON -7c. Website Publicity. Use the City's website to publicize information about protecting and accessing San Rafael's creeks and waterways. Responsibility: Community Development, Public Works Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time CON -7d. Creek Signage. Develop a program to provide attractive signage identifying creeks. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time See LU -2a (Development Review). 290 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CONSERVATION Amended 1/13/2016 Exhibit 36 SAM lAFA[L G!N!!Al FLAM Baylands 41 I - Bay Flat Channel Flat -I%- Diked Marsh ,• L L �� j -ManagedMuted = Tidal Marsh Old Marsh — - = r .. t llllfi� Storage or Treatment Basin Young High Tidal Marsh v% Bay Waters �� aEstuary Institute. For detailed site environmental Exhibit 37 fAN IA�I[l 61 N![AL ALAN Watersheds and Creeks Watershed Boundary Creeks Watersheds: (1). San Rafael Creek: la. Mahon Creek 1b. IrMn Creek 1c. Black Canyon/Lincoln Creeks 1d. E. San Rafael Drainage Assessment District 2. Gallines Creek 3. Miller Creek 4. Loch Lomond Creek 5. Glenwood Creek 6. Peacock Gap 7. E. San Rafael[San Quentin P.S. 8. South Pond/Piombo P.S. 9, McNear Watershed 10. China Camp Watershed 0 I]rainage Pump Stations 0 500 1000 1500 Meters 0 1 Mlles CON -8. Enhancement of Creeks and Drainageways. Explore enhancement of, and support continuous upgrades to, drainageways to serve as wildlife habitat corridors for wildlife movement and to serve as flood control facilities to accommodate storm drainage. Require creek enhancement and associated riparian habitat restoration/creation for projects adjacent to creeks to maintain storm flows, reduce erosion and maintenance and improve habitat values, where feasible. CON -8a. Creek Restoration. Encourage and support efforts by neighborhood associations, environmental organizations and other interested groups to fund creek enhancement, restoration and maintenance programs. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time CON -8b. Tree Retention. Retain trees along creeks, where possible, for preservation of riparian habitat and to inhibit growth of algae. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time See LU -2a (Development Review). Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CONSERVATION 293 Native Plants, Animals and Wildlife Habitat Vegetation, fish, and wildlife habitat are essential to the community of San Rafael. As development pressures grow, the need for preservation of the valuable diversity of species becomes increasingly important. The San Rafael Planning Area contains several habitat areas of major importance including oak woodlands, riparian, the open waters of the San Francisco Bay and wetlands. These communities support a complex diversity of fish and wildlife species. A number of sensitive plant and animal species have either been observed within the Planning Area, or are known to occur within the region. The City recognizes the ecological, scientific, aesthetic and cultural values of without undue disturbance. Protection of threatened and endangered species shall also extend to habitat that might reasonably be expected to support populations of those species, consistent with the requirements of state and federal law. The City recognizes the need to contribute to the protection of native plants and animals, and their habitats, before their populations are so low that they must be listed as threatened or endangered under the state and federal endangered species acts and will provide protection to special status species. Examples of the sensitive plant and animal species are: the California Black Rail, the California Clapper Rail, the Salt Marsh Harvest Mouse, the Central California Coast Steelhead and the Marin Western Flax. The endangered Clapper Rail is a secretive resident of the Bay marshes. CON -9. Native and/or Sensitive Habitats. Protect habitats that are sensitive, rare, declining, unique or represent a valuable biological resource. CON -9a. Steelhead Habitat. Support efforts to restore, preserve or enhance Central California Coast Steelhead habitat in Miller Creek and other creeks. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time CON -9b. Feral Cats. To protect habitats, especially for birds and small animals, continue to fund programs of the Marin Humane Society including those to reduce the population of feral cats. Responsibility: City Manager Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time See CON -15a (Invasive Plant Ordinance), OS -2b (Removal of Invasive Species), and LU - 2a (Development Review). 294 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CONSERVATION Amended 1/13/2016 CON -10. Impacts to Sensitive Habitats. Minimize impacts to sensitive natural habitats through careful planning. Require compliance with applicable laws and regulations. CON -10a. Oak Savanna/Woodland Habitat Protection. Require that proposed developments with potential impacts to oak savanna/woodland habitat to either avoid, minimize, or compensate for the loss of oak savanna/woodland habitat. Avoidance would be the preferred measure where feasible. If it is deemed that an impact is unavoidable, minimization of direct and indirect impacts or compensation through habitat restoration, creation, or enhancement would be required. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time See LU -2a (Development Review). CON -11. Wildlife Corridors. Preserve and protect areas that function as wildlife corridors, particularly those areas that provide natural connections permitting wildlife movement between designated sensitive habitats. See LU -2a (Development Review). CON -12. Preservation of Hillsides. Encourage preservation of hillsides, ridgelines and other open areas that serve as habitat and erosion protection as well as visual backdrops to urban areas. CON -12a. Hillside Design Guidelines. Continue to implement the Hillside Design Guidelines. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees See CD -5a (Views) and CD -6a (Hillside Design Guidelines). CON -13. Threatened and Endangered Species. Preserve and protect threatened and endangered species of plants and animals formally listed consistent with the state and federal endangered species acts including protection of their habitat. CON -13a. List of Species. Maintain a current list of threatened and endangered and special status species. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees See LU -2a (Development Review). Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CONSERVATION 295 !�Exhibit 38 � --. Threatened and a Endangered Species g r 4 5 1. Marin Western Flax" 8,10 ..}-- ._ 2. California Black Rail' ,� � � 3. �al'rfarnia Brown Pelican' 4. '-alifornia Clapper Rail' 5. Sal Marsh Harvest Mouse' 6. croft Bird's -beak`* \ r_; 7. Nhite Rayed Pentachaeta"" S a n P a b! o 8 a y 8. 3teelhead Central Calif. Coast— ` 9. Tidewater Goby'" (� ` 10. 3alifomia Red -legged Frog" 11. Western Snowy Snowy Pl A: "NOTE: The locations shown on this map are generalized and are intended to show the approximate areas where the spades is located based on past and current observations, t CNDOB accounts, and the presence of suitable habitat. " NOTE: The locations shown on this :.: lized and are intended to show the approximate areas where the species is likely to be found based on presence of suitable �— habitat- The species was not currently observed *thin these areas, but it may reasonably be expected to occur in the general area. Sources: Cello nia Natural Diversity Data Base (CDFG 2001) Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants (USFWS 2)011 Annual Report on the Status of California State Listed Threatened and Endangered Animals and Plants (CDFG, 2COD) Jean Sta*weather (2003) r 500 1000 1500 Meters NO 9! 1 Milest CON -14. Special Status Species. Preserve and protect special status plants and animals, including candidate species for listing under the state and federal endangered species acts, California species of special concern, California Native Plant Society List 1B plants, and other species protected under provisions of California Fish and Game Code. CON -14a. Surveys. Require that vacant sites be surveyed for the presence or absence of relevant special status species prior to development approval. Responsibility: Community Development, Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time CON -14b. Minimization. Require that where impacts to special status species are deemed unavoidable, potential impacts to the identified species are minimized through design, construction, and operation of the project. Compensation measures could include on-site set asides or off-site acquisitions (e.g. conservation easements, deed restrictions, etc.) that would be required if project impacts result in direct loss or indirect impacts that cannot be mitigated in other ways. This might also involve species-specific enhancement restoration efforts for the mitigation lands. Responsibility: Community Development, Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time See LU -2a (Development Review). CON -15. Invasive Non -Native Plant Species. Remove and control selected undesirable invasive non-native plant species from City - owned open space and road right of ways, and encourage the removal and control of these invasive plant species from non -City owned ecologically -sensitive areas. CON -15a. Invasive Plant Ordinance. Consider the legality, feasibility and enforceability of an Invasive Plant Ordinance addressing the removal of invasive species on private and public properties. As part of the ordinance, evaluate the benefits and impacts of using herbicide on invasive species where there are no other feasible controls. Responsibility: City Attorney, Community Development, Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time CON -15b. Removal of Invasive Species on Public Property. Institute a program to remove invasive plant species on public properties. Consider the use of volunteers and private organizations to assist in this effort. Responsibility: Public Works, Fire Timeframe: Long Term Resources: Staff Time, Volunteers, Partnerships See LU -2a (Project Review) and OS -2b (Removal of Invasive Species). CON -16. Landscape with Native Plant Species. Encourage landscaping with native and compatible non-native plant species, especially drought -resistant species. CON -16a. Distribution of Information. Distribute Marin Municipal Water District and other organizations' educational materials about native plant landscaping. Responsibility: Community Development, Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CONSERVATION 297 GOAL 32: RESOURCES USED WISELY (DELETED, MOVED TO SUSTAINABILITY) Danifin Goo and Clen+rin Gempany (PG&E) p yirdeo g and elen+riG utilities +e +he planning area and Marin M ROGipal Wa+3r D�3trlot IMMWD) preMaa li7n Pafael with its wator oNpply. Selig waste ,deposal SeFViGe is previded-byAqsrin Ssnitsry SeFVOGe; and the Marin Den"nling and Deoourne Denoyery A000nia+inn p Virde n urhoirde ren\,nling nnllen+ion c PG&expeE to that the relatively grordi al res.l dential -and- gnmrmcroial growtI prs}es r Sai Pr-fc'I mia Irl net nay se a c'gnifiocxit impan+ nn the utility's ability to prc.GP.Wiee. (`n nctn in+inn of major new clop+rin distributi^^ faniliticc in i ilrl not he needed to meet the PFGjeGted eleGtFiGal dernands. in addition, the ORA! develeprn antiGipated would require 1 . The Red .feed- I anrdfll io eRtly permit C mcl(Imm landfill n pity of 1- 1 milling 66lb4G yaFds nit„ is estimatedte he `'.Q MilligR ^"hip yards and ni 1rreRtly p muter- +e repeR 141 S Upplieo of nnp-rene;.,ahle energy re6o6Irne666IGh as pe+r :calm, nnturol gasand E3�erf ��� fuels, and +rheFe�� ' d + zv f Tc'r w�=rvn-rec-rr��d moi-rive-ni--crthe I�v^�pi^�icni-r. Dene;.,ahle energy reoe„rneo 66nh as oelar and gecthr-rrr/V ar-rgy, have -bear, aV ailahle fpr rtenar+eo With +enhnoinginal adVanneo R terns Gb^she tho rising neo+o of non„en+ional r renewable eRergy reooUrneo aro an attras+,ye al+erna+i"e for hOmcc an-'a-;�eSSeS. Energy n^noen'&'�ion io viewed 3o an arae gy FeSeUFOe, o e the effinien+ -W^f eRe gy allows our energy supplies to be GGFIS l,; -red arta slewer rate. gy nonoen,a+inn inolurdeo o inh m ur.JrJ w t6rning eff lights and equipment .,hen net eeede�, p!wn}ing tic th7t 0x -,de b6IlIdlRgG dUF4Rg-the summer and UGiRg f6el-en;meRt eh'nle vcnimccT. 298 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CONSERVATION Amended 1/13/2016 residdeMtial al odd in�'.sctrl Ql ng s designed +n erli inn+e +he n deSigR. TraRspertatiGR related measures that lead te eReFgy GE)RservatieR Might v�gn cn� land-uso p&\\bm3 th&A red inn trip Inns+ham thereby reduGinn fess G3n3umption. /nnMVVD1 ln/a+3r is s limiter' pat ural r rn3 ths� i3 depeRdeRt upon rsinfsll. NSB relies o within Marin rn„n+„ andel ,.%tor imported -f Orn th3 P-NC/Jisn River ddemestin andd n al oanciUrnptigR, as well as fpr fire ern+en+inn and+ it ga+inn of landSGap'Rg. Reuse and G0n,.;tnPW'An of water threugheut the year helps to previd �liahle cni rre -Add reddunes the Mood+ and- nest of coni ging eut_ef_aroz cxipp"os. Examples of water nonsen,atinn measi gyres inn'--dde aerators for -Add ,;hPw,Qrh,Q;;d,;, !()w flow toilets, irrigation system timers and mpniters drought tole lan&Gaping he r ,nledd.'n ashes ^resvl lcwndri odd a _ enddi+iening to�.,ers a nanddiddates fer reuse (the major use of ren"nledd water is briJk3saping with gray water). Reduce, Recycle �7 Reuse, i ase of less of a recon erne material, S �nh as the n� irnhase of nredd� �n+s WO minimal naGkaging• reuse of a nreddUnt in ,oh,es +he r pplioation of a used nreddUn+ addddi+ional times hefere ddisnesal nh as ddena+inn ole+hes to a 3hsrltsblg n za+ien FeGyGling renronessing of used paper in+e newsprint, Conserving oeesses arse save ene singe less energy i& „seal "., n in the mining/harvesting, nrnnessing andd transport of finished nrnddu3t. Thio i3 true of all reSG erne hypes from the nnmmonh, renvnledd items Unh as gAm p ,pw ziuminum,r andd tin to r of gees 3h ro plmtiGs and autemebile related waste �i stream red-, ,n+ien Residents bus'Ressesodd n en+ she"dd 'di cel th" is redYGe, rewse odd r ,ole materials Tho din P49,zcl Rnn,,L,�Quarry its Ionated in,.I6minG,erp �V Clan Rafael at 100 Ik& Son PdRead. tr See NIH 141 loan Rafael RnnL Quarry and McNlear B4Gk .,nrLfl MH 112 (SaR Rafael Renk Quarry Imparts' anw W! 1 d 2 (San Rafael Rock Quarry Shereline Use) andd the Marin Go„ntywidde Pan for nolinies regarding +h3 San Rsf&\31 P-,oGk Quarry. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CONSERVATION 299 Resource Conservation Policies Resource conservation policies and programs sharing similar or complementary directions and obiectives have been incorporated into the Sustainability Element. See SU -4e (Regional Enerqv Office), SU -4f (Zoning and Buildinq Code Review), SU - 4q (Clean Enerqv Production), SU -5b (Use of Alternative Buildinq Materials), SU -5d (Water Efficiencv Proqrams), SU -5e (Water Recvclinq), SU -6a (Site Design), SU -10e (Recvclinq), SU -1 Of (Recyclable Waste Receptacles), SU -10q (Revclinq for Apartments and Nonresidential Buildings), SU -1 Oh (Demolition Waste), SU -10i (Recvcling Education), SU -12b (Marin Countv Green business Program), SU -14a (Alternative Transportation Options), SU -14b (Alternative Fuel for Citv Fleet), SU -14d (City Electricitv), SU -14i (Civic Buildings), SU -14i (Green Business Certification), SU - 14k (Regional Collaboration), SU -141 (Backup Enerqv Provision) CON -17. Resource -efficient Organizations and Businesses. (Moved to Sustainability) Efie&dfa c ee......e.—a! pr-opei4y ewmn, Kartti�omt b-ailding awnefs and fien .,4:t o .,a4ions to ben water- 04'4:, ient 0 000 CON -17a. Regional Energy Office. (Moved to Sustinabilitv) Eensi cr grAiir*Gt; the County's Regional Energy offiee. Timefmme: Long Term Dosou Staff Time T 0 t 1 v 21 VtcNIC1"s!c The-Gailfc rn i & lkilding Gede establishes buil eneFgy efficienGy standards fnr nei.y cenotn Ictien (including requirements for entire new buildings, additions, alterations, and in nORresideR buildings, 1977, the Building CnergV Cfficie V Standards (alesg with standards fere efficient" In Qprp"�ir&-R� have helped Galmfnarp'ans save wero thsn $11.3 Stand—ards are updated periediGally to al CON 17b. Green Business Program. (Moved to Sustainabilitv) °w'. Ywovras she paFtieipate in the County's Green Business pr-ogfam. Tifne ame:Ongoing Resouy,ln: Siaff Time CON -18. Resource -Efficient Building Design. (Moved to Sustainabilitvl ObStaeleS t. .,te their- ' CON -18a. Energy-efficient Homes. (Deleted) Eneaufage the e nstpaetio of l,emes and btii _V�q� tlsat oxeeed Titlez4 standards. GonsideF adoption of an o requiFiN Responsibifit)­Gc�,-.\m.,ni Development T2neftzHi e:�vi4 i eFHi Resour-ees: Sta.. Time CON -18b. Zoning and Building Code Review. (Moved to Sustainabilitv) :t. b l:t y of o!�ctaz4e&. lZlJilJrC�9'1fI� : Ga ff uait., Development Trw_,.f+a n . Sho.t To..., Resour-ces: Staff Time 300 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CONSERVATION Amended 1/13/2016 CON -18c. Use of Alternative Building Materials. (Moved to Sustainabilitv) late the hemafx and imVzts of amending the City'.. building ,.odes and Zoning 0,.3inwn-;4-'4x to allow the use ef.teee..*xk)-- �-A--urse efff,. e t ,.l.o,..,..ative 1,,,;1,x;.,, ntatz-.AV)c a -,l metheds. Responsibility: GGmiminity-DeveloprP&nt Timefratne: Ongoing ResottFees: Staff Time CON -18d. Incentives for Solar and Clean Energy. (Moved to Sustainabilitv) Seep ways toprovide : enfivr aolaaNatA ilea efter-gy stems Tifnef•. mei Long g Term D oseweesi Grants CON -18e. LEED Program. (Deleted) developers to ise "Lea dx oltir in E& 2r-gy and EfwirunmanWl Dzot^n"^"" Standards. Timef:-.,m.. 1 Ria At Tcpm Resetifees! Fees CON -18f. Civic Buildings. (Moved to Sustainabilitv) Requir-e that new, expanded or- r-eneva4ed City baild*--,- th t a eed 5,000 squar-e foot .,ehieye ., r --- (Le>ade ahi in En-timnm,,AM 1 Design Standard3) gxa� .1�uildmg rating ere"ivale-nt. This rA shall not apply te City facilities w-hieh afe 1 Tmef. Ongoing Rese ,, ees! r ~--�W. Fusd, Capital impr-evemei-A CON -19. Energy Resources. (Moved to Sustainability) Support the development of r-enewable and/of effieie geaef:mifig r-esoufees to Feel ee the Ce,m4y's fell ,,ee ,. non able enefyy ,..rem CON -19a. Energy Production. (Moved to Sustainabilitv) Consider means -4a -jnjaxxge options, 'fiffle€fafnei skeft Te1ffi-Reseweesi Staff Time CON -20. Water Conservation. (Moved to Sustainabilitv) L E E V ! c cs! c r c h i p i n ten it :.„nmcntcI C'�sigr� Thc ! EED tLe crchip in Engrgy and 4=n"irenmental design) Green Building Rating -St11m TM Q �.nl��ntan, nc�'Ce �.Ic i�RS?d P,aticnal znd—Arrl fnr r1n ,nlnning high_ man , c►ivWina!:�gtwild+nr&\ ! EED provides o nlete framework fnr asse&siI building nerfer.,-,nn" cn> m --e" suc*AiNah-ility goals. Based a well _fe Rded TcilTiifiin TtLAc� L E E D • m rn s Iz vTstate efi #tic cri eirzhqg+es Qr cuc+/--i"hlc cite develWxnent, rater „inge eRergy effinienn„ % LEEL, r ites expe a a o is !yaainczac�e, h nwo ana iast;t„*;ers e�a iner-ease the use of r-eeyeled water, CON -20a. Water Conserving Landscaping. (Moved to Sustainabilitv) Make ..,....hale landscaping anwater 00 jV'Ating mot1 ods and r -es Responsibility: Conununity Development Timef-ame: Long Term � 2 6j. Ii.7 Werkcrc "rt nd r rle the waste csr a pct tl in S c n y- sprvwnps e Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CONSERVATION 301 Resmrxig: EtxgTime CON -20b. Water Recycling. (Moved to Sustainabilitv) , Suppeft the e.,teasiea of Feeyeled ..ter ,l:stFib tni i19F4'vima-okim. '—%oquira the a ef,•e 010,7 .,te w he e available. 2cTimoilali y:�: Gonunmi 'mac-1ci t Timeframe: Ongoing ResottFees: Fees CON -21. Waste Reduction/Recycling. (Moved to Sustainability) Efteourage waste FeEIi etio practices. T:n,.,,,,fage recycling through provision of reeyelingeen e> , and ayi..g an now Mgromzz. CON -21a. Recycling. (Moved to Sustainabilitv) >J..,.e••fage e& As to pfamete Feeyeh Ss auels -.\j cpe9waging, k/ac/,mx sses to r-eeyele 1.,,:1.1:«,. and .fix mat pFo Hing wrxroofing by otauiwtta, imt' ( anseFy lien !'oFps' work to promote .,.4..,. w"rrjilality, City ,`,range, Cmr-unity Deyele..,v.en Timoffafnei Ongoing D esou fees! Staff Time CON -21b. Recyclable Waste Receptacles. (Moved to Sustainability) eHf€erts- T -N&xK��=tar, to ixzU.1 axle eneaufage ,,.lis g of plasties glens, et,. Respensibilityi City Manager-, om'1' u-najDevelopmei-A Time zffa ne; Shaft Te CON -21c. Recycling for Apartments and Nonresidential Buildings. (Moved to Sustainabilitv) Eftee,,fage ..1;~^ fazilitiQj air.,-Iffegmff is -fa esrt&ia: t-a*d HE)fffeSi bvlil and pr-egrams apartment c%tiia). !milding-,. Manager - Timeframe: Te Resources: StaffTime CON -21d. Demolition Waste. (Moved to Sustainabilitv) Study ways te aetivel waste. TtY_9f•^fae: T e g TerY RenOW6em Staff T -i e CON -21e. Recycling. (Moved to Sustainabilitv) Encourage rin its recycling education programs, and to reach out to those not aware of the "reduce, reus-e and recycle" techniques. Responsibility: City Manager Timekame: Ongoing Re-wurx,c : U,cFfaTifnc 302 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CONSERVATION Amended 1/13/2016 CON -22. Resource Efficiency in Site Development. (Moved to Sustainabilitv) fiup3m"t t111:1tT3t4ati9na t@fi3c' tines a -ad i ieeipereAe-eseur-ee a -ad energy effieie « CON -22a. Site Design. (Moved to Sustainabilitv) >✓,,,.lua4e . pai4 of deyeia .fnen4 . , - opesed site design for- enefgy effieieney, sueh as shading of par -king lots a Re Fees CON -23. Energy-efficient Transportation Programs. (Moved to Sustainabilitv) q -SM), public t`1 zuit, ear—pools/yanpools, ride m «e , i.:eyel:rg and other- alte -,,.awes to the energy ifieffieiefft tise of vehieles. CON -23a. City Carpool. (Moved to Sustainabilitv) >rr,.,,,,, age ineentive for- the Responsibilityi Community Development Timeftafne: Shaft Resewees: Staff Time, Genefal Fund Car Sig), C— 11 e (La Lmpoctt Altef Vehieles), G 11 d (Bike to Work Day). CON -24. Energy-, Water- and Resource -Efficiency in Government. (Moved to Sustainability) Promote and se 0 as an e ff etive lea or in irrels2Y3i4., CON -24a. Green Business Certification. (Moved to Sustainabilitv) ccircte: Cou-pAy's Green Business program to become certified as a Niarin wx!luc� miaaa. As p of the pro— mays for the City to improve recycling and resoufoe efficien pufohases and designate ., staff per -son ; each department to abslidh and nwinto;n Development,recycling in City facilities, Responsibility: Conununity City Manager Resetweesi Staff Time CON -24b. Regional Collaboration. (Moved to Sustainabilitv) u....+:,.:,...+o in -egg na 1hilk VZZXR8te Or 04140 7X7f1_Vn ?HeF-gy SOw 6 oE)F ..o, oG0 v v Responsibility: City Manage-r- Timeftame: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time CON -24c. City Vehicle Fleet. (Moved to Sustainabilitv) Consider- new .o,l,,ee + Publie SII eEks Time,Timeffame� Ongoing Resewees: Staff Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CONSERVATION 303 CON -24d. Renewable Energy Sources in City Facilities. (Moved to Sustainabilitv) Gonsidef the use of renewable energy teehaelogy stieh as selai-7, eegener-a4ion and fuel cells Timefr-ame� Ongoing ReseuFees: Staff Time CON -25. Energy Emergencies. (Moved to Sustainability) st+staified energy shortages, CON -25a. Backup Energy Provision. (Moved to Sustainabilitv) ,.lteF. Ve . eh as a,ol -,ml wml zalar- gener- o-.-ba�l-upz, to the sustained use of,.aseli poweroa genef,.f Timeframe: ShefTe ResouFoes: Staff Time 304 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / CONSERVATION Amended 1/13/2016 Air and Water Quality Our Natural Resources Introduction Water and air are essential for humans as well as the animals and plants that inhabit San Rafael. The Air and Water Quality Element is intended to ensure that high quality air and water are available to all who reside, work, and play in the City. Internal combustion engines damage both the air and water around us. Emissions from gas -powered vehicles contribute fine particulate matter into the air that is eventually carried away to waterways. The City seeks to mitigate the effects of vehicular pollution by supporting policies that promote more environmentally friendly forms of transport as well as promote land use design practices that are more efficient. Maintaining and improving water quality is essential to protect public health, wildlife, and watersheds, and to ensure opportunities for public recreation and economic development in San Rafael. Water pollution can be dramatically curbed through proactive efforts of residents and through City policies. San Rafael is a member of the Marin County Stormwater Pollution Prevention Program (MCSTOPPP), which is the leader in stormwater management within the Bay Area. MCSTOPPP's programs encourage public participation, education and appropriately designed development to curb water pollution in the County. The City encourages the use of practices that enable water to percolate into the surrounding soil, instead of letting sediment, metals, pesticides and chemicals runoff directly into the Bay, creeks, or through the storm drain system. Improving the water quality in San Rafael's creeks and canal is a priority. The City supports efforts to clean up existing bodies of water and to prevent further degradation. Through education, participation in ongoing programs, and innovative strategies, the City seeks to provide clean air and water and, to the best of its ability, contribute to a healthy region. Potable, or drinking, water is covered in the Conservation Element and governed by the Marin Municipal Water District and State standards. Volunteers help clean up San Rafael creeks. Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 /AIR AND WATER QUALITY 305 GOAL 33: CLEAN AIR AND WATERWAYS It is the goal of San Rafael to have the residents of San Rafael breathe clean air and have clean waterways. It is desirable that San Rafael meets all ambient air quality standards and that San Rafael's waterways are clean and healthy. San Rafael Air Quality Policies AW -1. State and Federal Standards. Continue to comply and strive to exceed state and federal standards for air quality for the benefit of the Bay Area. AW -la. Cooperation with Other Agencies. Cooperate with the Bay Area Air Quality Management District (BAAQMD) and other agencies T o x i c A i r o r O d o r in their efforts to ensure compliance with existing air quality regulations. Responsibility: Community Development, Public Works Toxic air pollutants at sufficient Timeframe: Ongoing concentrations and exposure are Resources: Staff Time known or suspected to cause cancer or other serious health effects, such as reproductive or birth defects, or to cause adverse environmental consequences. Sensitive Receptors The Bay Area Air Quality Management District (BAAQMD) defines sensitive receptors as facilities where sensitive receptor population groups (children, the elderly, the acutely ill, and the chronically ill) are likely to be located. These land uses include schools, retirement homes, convalescent homes, hospitals and medical clinics. Exhibit B-8 in the Background Report shows the locations of major sensitive receptors in San Rafael. AW -2. Land Use Compatibility. To ensure excellent air quality, promote land use compatibility for new development by using buffering techniques such as landscaping, setbacks, and screening in areas where different land uses abut one another. AW -2a. Sensitive Receptors. Through development review, ensure that siting of any new sensitive receptors provides for adequate buffers from existing sources of toxic air contaminants or odors. If development of a sensitive receptor (a facility or land use that includes members of the population sensitive to the effects of air pollutants, such as children, the elderly and people with illnesses) is proposed within 500 feet of Highway 101 or I-580, an analysis of mobile source toxic air contaminant health risks should be performed. Development review should include an evaluation of the adequacy of the setback from the highway and, if necessary, identify design mitigation measures to reduce health risks to acceptable levels. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees AW -2b. Buffers. Through development review, ensure that any proposed new sources of toxic air contaminants or odors provide adequate buffers to protect sensitive receptors and comply with existing health standards. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees 306 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / AIR AND WATER QUALITY Amended 1/13/2016 AW -3. Air Quality Planning with Other Processes. Integrate air quality considerations with the land use and transportation processes by mitigating air quality impacts through land use design measures, such as encouraging project design that will foster walking and biking. AW -3a. Air Pollution Reduction Measures. Consider revisions to zoning regulations to require developers to implement strategies for air quality improvement described in the BAAQMD/ABAG's guide "Design Strategies for Encouraging Alternatives to Auto Use Through Local Development Review" or subsequent standards. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Short Term Resources: Fees AW -3b. Smart Growth and Livable Communities Programs. Participate in and implement strategies of Metropolitan Transportation Commission's regional "Smart Growth Initiative" and "Transportation for Livable Communities Program." Responsibility: Community Development, Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time, Grants AW -4. Particulate Matter Pollution Reduction. Promote the reduction of particulate matter pollution from roads, parking lots, construction sites, agricultural lands and other activities. AW -4a. Pollution Reduction. Through development review, ensure that any proposed new sources of particulate matter use latest control technology (such as enclosures, paving unpaved areas, parking lot sweeping and landscaping) and provide adequate buffer setbacks to protect existing or future sensitive receptors. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees P a r t i c u late M atter Particulate matter is a toxic air pollutant. Particulate matter includes dust, soot and other tiny bits of solid materials that are released into and move around in the air. Particulates are produced by many sources, including burning of gas and diesel fuels by vehicles, incineration of garbage, mixing and application of fertilizers and pesticides, road construction, mining operations, fireplaces, and woodstoves. Particulate pollution can cause eye, nose and throat irritation and other health problems. AW -4b. Fireplaces and Woodburning Stoves. (Deleted) CooperateA4th the local air quality district to monitor air pollution and enforce Rea ••ern vr�rrc�cG1"�51► 1�417� rlo.�t Tifae f-. mei ShoFt Tor , Re -sources: Staff Time AW -5. Circulation Alternatives. Promote circulation alternatives that reduce air pollution. See programs under C-10 (Alternative Transportation Mode Projects) through C-20 (Intermodal Transit Hubs). Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 /AIR AND WATER QUALITY 307 AW -6. Education and Outreach. Support public education of regarding air pollution prevention and mitigation programs. AW -6a. Air Quality Education Programs. Support and participate in the air quality education programs of the BAAQMD, such as "Spare the Air" days. Responsibility: Community Development, Public Work Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time AW -6b. Benefits of Transit -Oriented Development. Assist in educating developers and the public on the benefits of pedestrian and transit -oriented development. Responsibility: Community Development, Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time AW -6c. Landscaping. Continue to implement Zoning Guideline for landscaping in order to absorb pollutants. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees See AW 4b (Fir-eplaees and 117mm4-g fj✓ ems} San Rafael Water Quality Policies AW -7. Local, State and Federal Standards. Continue to comply with local, state and federal standards for water quality. AW -7a. Countywide Stormwater Program. Continue to participate in the countywide stormwater program and comply with its performance standards. N o n- p o i n t S o u r c e Responsibility: Public Works P o l l u t i o n Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees (Clean Water Program) Nonpoint source (NPS) pollution, unlike pollution from industrial and sewage treatment plants, comes from many diffuse sources. NPS pollution is caused by rainfall moving over and through the ground. As the runoff moves, it picks up and carries away natural and human -made pollutants, finally depositing them into bodies of water. AW -7b. Stormwater Runoff Measures. Continue to incorporate measures for stormwater runoff control and management in construction sites. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees (Clean Water Program) AW -7c. Water Quality Improvements in Canal and Other Waterways. Support water quality improvement efforts in the San Rafael Canal, creeks, and drainageways in accordance with standards of the State Water Quality Control Board or any agencies with jurisdiction. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees (Clean Water Program) 308 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / AIR AND WATER QUALITY Amended 1/13/2016 AW -8. Reduce Pollution from Urban Runoff. Address non -point source pollution and protect receiving waters from pollutants discharged to the storm drain system by requiring Best Management Practices quality. • Support alternatives to impervious surfaces in new development, redevelopment, or public improvement projects to reduce urban runoff into storm drain system, creeks, and the Bay. • Require that site designs work with the natural topography and drainages to the extent practicable to reduce the amount of grading necessary and limit disturbance to natural water bodies and natural drainage systems. • Where feasible, use vegetation to absorb and filter fertilizers, pesticides and other pollutants. AW -8a. Proper Disposal of Pollutants. Continue to promote proper disposal of pollutants to the sanitary sewer or hazardous waste facilities rather than to the storm drainage system. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees (Clean Water Program) Best Managemen Practices Best Management Practices are guidelines used to ensure that project design, construction, and maintenance are conducted so as to control urban runoff and to minimize the impact on the surrounding environment. AW -8b. Compliance by Contractors. Continue to require contractors to comply with accepted stormwater pollution prevention planning practices for all projects subject to erosion potential. Also, continue to require the proper use, storage and disposal of on-site materials. Responsibility: Public Works, Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees (Clean Water Program) AW -8c. System Improvements. Improve storm drainage performance by constructing new system improvements. Evaluate stormwater volumes when replacing undersized or otherwise inadequate lines with larger or parallel lines. Responsibility: Public Works, Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees (Clean Water Program) AW -8d. Pesticide and Fertilizer Management. On City property, encourage the appropriate reduction of pesticides and fertilizers to the maximum extent feasible. Ensure that the application of pesticides on City property is accomplished in accordance with all applicable rules and regulations. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time AW -8e. Public Water Management. Review areas where public water management procedures are used to convey stormwater to the stormdrain system, including streets, which also convey stormwater to the stormdrain system. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees (Clean Water Program) See I-1Oa (Coordination of Services) and S -19a (Incremental Flood Control Improvements). AW -9. Erosion and Sediment Control. Establish development guidelines to protect areas that are particularly susceptible to erosion and sediment loss. See S -22a (Erosion Control Programs) and S -22b (Grading During the Wet Season). Amended 1/13/2016 SAN RAFAEL 2020 /AIR AND WATER QUALITY 309 AW -10. Canal and Bay Boating. Ensure responsible waste disposal maintenance and operations that affects water quality. AW -10a. Sanitation Facilities in Boats. Require inspection of sanitation facilities in boats berthed in the San Rafael Canal. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time AW -10b. Sewage Pump Out Facilities. Support marina owners in providing on-site sewage pump -out facilities. Require marinas to install such facilities when major improvements are made. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Grants, Staff Time AW -10c. Education of Boaters. Educate boaters about good sanitation practices. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Staff Time See NH -29a (Dredging Program), NH -79b (Boating Sanitation and Dock Safety and NH - 80a (Pump Out Facilities). AW -11. Education and Outreach. Continue to inform the public about the effects of water pollution in order to encourage participation in pollution prevention programs. AW -11a. Stenciling of Storm Drains. Continue the efforts to identify storm drain locations and stencil them accordingly so that people understand the consequences of pollutant runoff. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees (Clean Water Program) AW -11b. Outreach. Continue to work with MCSTOPPP in educational outreach and public participation in water pollution reduction methods that, for example, address the impacts of indirect pollution sources such as fertilization, pesticides and pet waste. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees (Clean Water Program) AW -11c. Water Pollution Education. Educate landscaping service employees and contractors about water pollution. Responsibility: Public Works Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees (Clean Water Program) AW -11d. Car Wash Facilities. Require the use of recycled water at new commercial car washing facilities. Responsibility: Public Works, Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing Resources: Fees 310 SAN RAFAEL 2020 / AIR AND WATER QUALITY Amended 1/13/2016 EXHIBIT 2 - ATTACHMENT B (GPA15-001) General Plan 2020 Land Use Map Amendments: The following revisions to the General Plan Land Use Map are consistent with current Zoning Designations: 1. Revision from "General Commercial" to "Public/Quasi-Public" Land Use Category for contiguous SMART ROW Property. Irwin Street at Francisco Blvd W. APN 013-021-31 - r w _,� -• sl4ji ,rah r s - ; ' 3. Revision from "General Commercial" to "Public/Quasi-Public" Land Use Category for contiguous SMART ROW Property. Irwin Street at Francisco Blvd W. APN 013-021-35 1 ,p 2. Revision from "General Commercial" to "Public/Quasi-Public" Land Use Category for contiguous SMART ROW Property. Irwin Street at Francisco Blvd W. APN 013-021-34 �r 4. Revision from "High Density Residential" to "Residential/Office" Land Use, to be consistent with the existing and adjacent land uses. 1108 Irwin Street property. APN 014-083-17 I' ---_— y ' I Prig, iris �n r .T Exhibit B Page B-1 5. Revision from "Low Density Residential" to "Open Space" Land Use Category, for public property owned by the City. End of Bay Way. APN 016-261-09 + lo —4G f I .I { 7. Revision from "General Commercial" to "Public/Quasi-Public" Land Use Category, for public and SMART ROW property. Francisco Blvd W and Andersen Drive. APN 018-014-53 A -N- 6. Revision from "General Commercial" to "Public/Quasi-Public" Land Use Category, for public property owned by SRSD. Francisco Blvd W and Andersen Drive. APN 018-014-52 i ti ' 8. Revision from "Industrial" to "Public/Quasi-Public" Land Use Category, for SMART ROW property. Highway 101/ Jacoby Street. APN 018-141-04 and -05 Exhibit B Page B-2 9. Revision from undesignated right-of-way to "High Density Residential" Land Use Category, for developed multi -family property. 930 Cresta Drive. APN 155-280-09 -- 4, ]a 4 11. Revision from "Low Density Residential" to "Open Space" Land Use Category, for property at San Rafael Manor to be consistent with zoning and parcel map. Los Gamos Road at MT Freitas Pkwy. APN 179-240-11 ti4140 1% IF 10. Revision from "Low Density Residential" to "Open Space" Land Use Category, for public property owned by Marin County Open Space. Canyon Oak Drive. APN 165-112-16 77= rr 12. Revision from "Medium Density Residential" to "Open Space" Land Use Category, for public property owned by the City. Mariners Circle. 18042014 A% Exhibit B Page B-3 16. Revision to the Land Use Map and Legend from undesignated to new "Water" Land Use Category, for all public and privately owned properties or portions thereof within the City of San Rafael Planning Area Boundary that lie within the San Rafael Bay/ San Pablo Bay and the San Rafael Canal open and navigable waterways; which are tidally influenced. The Water designation shall apply to all or any portions of properties that lie within these navigable waterways during high tides. Any upland portions of parcels that are not covered by water during high tides shall not be included in the Water Land Use Category. Assessor Parcel Numbers and ownership: 009-010-27 City 009-142-47 United States 009-032-02 City 009-142-48 City 009-032-03 United States 009-142-49 City 009-042-07 Marina Vista Improvement Club 009-142-50 City 009-052-08 Marina Vista Improvement Club 009-142-51 City 009-141-01 Trust for Public Land 009-142-52 City 009-141-03 State of California 009-142-59 Schoonmaker Barbara Etal 009-141-04 State of California 009-150-04 Marin County Open Space Dist 009-141-05 Marina Village Assoc, LLC 009-150-05 Marin County Open Space Dist 009-141-07 Marina Village Assoc, LLC 009-150-06 Marin County Open Space Dist 009-141-08 Marina Village Assoc, LLC 009-150-34 Kerner Blvd LLC 009-141-09 State of California 009-150-43 Kerner Blvd LLC 009-141-10 United States 009-170-01 Marin Rod & Gun Club 009-141-11 State of California 009-291-01 City 009-141-12 State of California 009-291-25 City 009-141-13 State of California 009-291-26 City 009-141-14 State of California 009-291-27 Nature Conservancy 009-41-15 State of California 009-430-04 Dickson Robert Tr 009-141-16 State of California 016-261-05 Barbieri Family Tr 009-141-18 State of California 016-261-06 Craemer 1990 Survivors Tr 009-141-19 San Pedro Cove HOA 016-271-16 Clark Wayne M Tr 019-142-03 Hobbs Mary R Tr 016-310-27 San Pedro Cove HOA 009-142-07 San Rafael Marina, LLC 016-310-28 Paganini Charles Living Tr 009-142-09 Marin County Open Space Dist 016-310-29 Paganini Charles Living Tr 009-142-10 Marin County Open Space Dist 016-310-30 San Pedro Cove HOA 009-142-11 Marin County Open Space Dist 017-191-41 Newport Boating Assn Inc 009-142-12 Nature Conservancy Et Al 184-010-33 State of California 009-142-17 Marin Audubon Society 184-010-34 State of California 009-142-41 Marin County Open Space Dist 186 153-35&-36 (tideland portion of lot only) 009-142-42 Kerner Blvd LLC Miller John F tr & 009-142-43 Marin County Open Space Dist 008-010-16 Lowrie Investments LLC 009-142-45 Kerner Blvd LLC 009 29102&-03 (tideland portion of lot only) 009-142-46 Marin County Open Space Dist Shekou Joe Tr Exhibit B Page B-4 The following revisions to the General Plan Land Use Map will require subsequent Zoning Map amendments: 17. Revision from "General Commercial" to 18. Revision from "Low Density Residential" "Public/Quasi-Public" Land Use to "Open Space" Land Use Category, for Category, for property owned by SMART City owned property deemed open space in 1979 by Resolution 5687 and parcel map. Rice Street and Irwin Street. Balboa Ave and Pt San Pedro Rd. APN 01304134 APN 016-161-34 & 018-180-25 G 3 ,` � •< 'Yrs - 19. Revision from "Open Space" to "Low 20. Revision from "Low Density Residential" Density Residential" Land Use Category, to "Open Space" Land Use Category, for for developed residential property. property at San Rafael Manor to be consistent with zoning and parcel map. 1820 Pt San Pedro Rd. Los Gamos Road at MT Freitas Pkwy. APN 184-030-04 & -05 APN 179-240-12 & -13 r f � i L � f f l V f� r � r Exhibit B Page B-5 From: Amy Likover Sent: Monday, December 05, 2016 3:29 PM To: Paul Jensen Subject: Recommended Amendments to Plan 2020 Hi Paul, Cc San Rafael Heritage Board (SRH) Below are two historic preservation elements from Plan 2020 that I will address at tonight's City Council meeting. Like the City, the SRH Board would like an update to the Historic Preservation Ordinance, and a review of the Historic Architecture Survey. We are concerned enouah that both items are SRH Board aoals this vear. Additionally, the SRH Board has been working overtime to preserve historic structures as we see one historic building after another come to the DRB with demolition as an option. Your presentation tonight is timely in this regard, thank you! While the amendments have been vetted at every level, tonight I will ask the Council to PRIORITIZE the two items below from Plan 2020. Not sure if it's too late to change the wording, as in red below, "Update: Short Term" to Update: Annually" (Could be worded December 2017) Resources: (Add) "Local historic organizations" With our support and the Council's prioritization, both of these could be accomplished by December 2017, in time for San Rafael's 200th Anniversary. Would be an historic accomplishment! Thanks, Amy San Rafael Heritage Community Outreach CA -13b. Preservation Ordinance. Continue to implement the City's Historic Preservation Ordinance through the design review process. Update the City's Historic Preservation Ordinance and review the development application review procedures for the various classifications of buildings on the Historical Architecture Survey, including effective ways to review proposed changes to historic properties. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing. (Update: Annually) Resources: Staff Time; Local hititoric organizations CA -13c. Historic Preservation Advisory Committee. Establish a technical advisory committee or contract with an architectural historian, to provide the Design Review Board and Planning Commission with advice in design matters and policies related to the preservation and/or modification of historic structures. Responsibility: Community Development Timeframe: Ongoing. (Update: Annually) Resources: Staff Time, fees; Local historic organization;